192.168.x.x

>...what if we made local network IPs have to start with two 3 digit numbers even though they're the ones that will be manually typed out the most?
>oh instead of 1.1.x.x or something sensible? that's pretty funny, let's do it lol
ipv4 was a mistake

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  1. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    You're fricking moronic, aren't you?

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      not as far as I know?

  2. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    NAT was not even conceptualized when IPv4 was being designed. By the time NAT came around they had to take what they could get.

  3. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I don't see the problem. It's not like you have to use a rotary phone or something.

  4. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    There's nothing funnier than a zoomer trying to use his 21st century education-tier "logic" to try to reverse-engineer decisions made before his parents were born.

    Pray continue, kiddo. I've already got my popcorn, and I want to see if you can top this moronation.

  5. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    You can just use 10.0.X.X
    I admit it is weird I have seen more routers with 192.168 and even 172, but never 10.0.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      some isps decided to nat their customers to that 10.0.x.x range. so those people ended up with a double nat.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        the frick?

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Fun stuff. You can often omit the groups of zeroes, so it's 10.1, 10.2 etc

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Let me blow your mind.
        % ping 10.2 PING 10.2 (10.0.0.2): 56 data bytes
        64 bytes from 10.0.0.2: icmp_seq=0 ttl=64 time=0.103 ms
        64 bytes from 10.0.0.2: icmp_seq=1 ttl=64 time=0.126 ms
        64 bytes from 10.0.0.2: icmp_seq=2 ttl=64 time=0.101 ms

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Let me blow your mind.
        % ping 10.2 PING 10.2 (10.0.0.2): 56 data bytes
        64 bytes from 10.0.0.2: icmp_seq=0 ttl=64 time=0.103 ms
        64 bytes from 10.0.0.2: icmp_seq=1 ttl=64 time=0.126 ms
        64 bytes from 10.0.0.2: icmp_seq=2 ttl=64 time=0.101 ms

        I didn't know this, I thought that was only for ipv6

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          You can use all sorts of formats.

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            hex makes sense for ip addresses but integer just feels wrong

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            It's literally just a number.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      The biggest ISP in Australia generally uses 10.0.0.0, but it's a /24 rather than an /8.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      thats because the different classes addresses were created for different uses. It was handy for manually creating address tables etc. These days DHCP and DHCP reservations have mostly replaced the need to manually address things. But its good to know how and why they are assigned the way they are

  6. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    who needs ipv6 just add another row of 3 digits

  7. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Let me blow your mind.
    % ping 10.2 PING 10.2 (10.0.0.2): 56 data bytes
    64 bytes from 10.0.0.2: icmp_seq=0 ttl=64 time=0.103 ms
    64 bytes from 10.0.0.2: icmp_seq=1 ttl=64 time=0.126 ms
    64 bytes from 10.0.0.2: icmp_seq=2 ttl=64 time=0.101 ms

  8. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    It's not a fricking ipv6 address
    Are you lazy to type 2 fricking zeroes?

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      yes

  9. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    10.0.0.0/8 was formerly used by ARPANET and already reserved so they used that for class A networks.
    For class B and C they just used the next available unassigned ranges which were 172.16.0.0/12 and 192.168.0.0/24 respectively.
    >1.1.x.x or something sensible
    That was reserved at the time and considered poisoned because everybody used it for testing shit.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      https://i.imgur.com/3oXFzmY.png

      >...what if we made local network IPs have to start with two 3 digit numbers even though they're the ones that will be manually typed out the most?
      >oh instead of 1.1.x.x or something sensible? that's pretty funny, let's do it lol
      ipv4 was a mistake

      shits about to change motherfrickaz
      > "The proposed TLD is .INTERNAL and, as the name implies, it's intended for internal use only. The idea is that .INTERNAL could take on the same role as the 192.168.x.x IPv4 bloc – available for internal use but never plumbed into DNS or other infrastructure that would enable it to be accessed from the open internet."
      > .INTERNAL
      https://www.theregister.com/2024/01/29/icann_internal_tld

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Whatever happened to .local? That's what I've been using for years.

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          It's reserved for multicast DNS.

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Shittypedoa says that mDNS only resolves names with the .local TLD, not that the TLD is somehow reserved for it.

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            https://www.rfc-editor.org/rfc/rfc6762.html
            >Any DNS query for a name ending with ".local." MUST be sent to the mDNS IPv4 link-local multicast address 224.0.0.251 (or its IPv6 equivalent FF02::FB).
            https://www.iana.org/assignments/special-use-domain-names/special-use-domain-names.xml
            .home.arpa is reserved for home use.

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >b-buh muh rfc
            Oh good, I thought it might be something that actually mattered. Every DNS server I've ever met happily resolves .local addresses, every DNS client I've ever met happily submits them to a real DNS server.

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >something that actually mattered
            What would "matter"?

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Nothing really matters.

  10. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous
  11. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    fc00::1
    fc00::2
    aaah this ipv6 is too complex it's melting my brain...

  12. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    https://www.iana.org/assignments/iana-ipv4-special-registry/iana-ipv4-special-registry.xhtml
    private use: 10.0.0.0/8, 192.168.0.0/16
    1.1.x.x was already in use when this specification was created
    it's not that hard, anon

  13. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    If you see a bunch of unconvenient shortcuts used for personal use instead of convenient ones, then the reason's probably a historical mess which established these choices till they became a standard moving from which is a pain in the ass no one will subject themselves to.
    Computer and networks are like that all over the place. And in the place of boomers you wouldnt make better choices as you would operate in the same context as the now dying men.
    There's a new context. A new type of network for the internet missing ipv4 and other things would be good, but the change's fundamental, it requires a great storm which would disconnect shit from the current net, or the united global effort to build a new net on top of the existing one. I.e. either highly disruptive or will never happen.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Thanks ChatGPT.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >t. blind Black person

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