A materialistic natural science professor and advocate for technological progress was teaching a class on Karl Marx, known historical materialist.

A materialistic natural science professor and advocate for technological progress was teaching a class on Karl Marx, known historical materialist. "Before the class begins, you must clench your fists and salute to the dialectical materialism and accept that Marx's analysis of capitalism is the most cutting-edge critique in the history of socio-economic thought, surpassing even Aristotle's Politics!"

At this moment, a courageous, insightful, Aristotle-admiring ethical farmer who had written over 1500 papers on virtue ethics and understood the importance of teleological purpose in nature and fully supported the integration of ethical considerations into every aspect of life spoke:

"What is it that defines the good life, if not virtue and purpose, you technocrat?" he asked in a refined ancient Greek dialect.

The arrogant professor smirked quite industrially and smugly replied, "Production, you outdated essentialist."

"Wrong. Happiness and the good life cannot be reduced to mere material conditions or production outputs. If the good life, as you say, is measured by material wealth... then we lose sight of the true ends of human existence."

The professor was visibly shaken and dropped his chalk and copy of Das Kapital. He stormed out of the room, crying those materialist crocodile tears. The same tears Marxists cry for the “alienated worker” when they jealously try to strip away individual identity by reducing everything to economic relations. There is no doubt that at this point our professor, Karl Hegel, wished he had embraced the golden mean and become more than a reductionist historical determinist. He wished so much that he could find eudaimonia, but he had ensnared himself in his own chains of economic determinism!

The students applauded and all enrolled in courses on Aristotle's ethics that day and accepted the Nicomachean Ethics as the foundation for a fulfilling life. An eagle named “Phronesis” flew into the room and perched atop the bust of Socrates and shed a tear on the chalk. Aristotle's "Physics" was read several times, and virtue was cultivated, spreading balance and well-being throughout the land.

The professor lost his position and was dismissed the next day. He lived out his days attempting to farm, only to realize that without understanding the natural ends and virtues of things, he could never truly cultivate the land or his soul.

Ape Out Shirt $21.68

Black Rifle Cuck Company, Conservative Humor Shirt $21.68

Ape Out Shirt $21.68

  1. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    A materialist, empirically-bound physics professor and advocate for pure scientific reductionism was teaching a class on Ernst Mach, known for his principle of economy in science. "Before the class begins, you must embrace the concept that 'The Self is nothing but a bundle of sensations,' and accept that Mach's rejection of the atom is the most enlightened scientific position ever held, more refined than any classical element theory!”

    At this moment, a courageous, perceptive, nature-respecting Aristotelian biologist, who had written over 1500 papers on the intrinsic purposes of natural beings and understood the fundamental principles of teleology and fully endorsed the causative structures of existence, spoke up:

    "What is the principle by which this seed grows into a tree, esteemed educator?" he inquired in a dialect resonating with the wisdom of ancient philosophy.

    The condescending professor smirked quite reductively and arrogantly replied, “Chemical reactions, you outdated teleologist.”

    “Incorrect. Chemical reactions describe the 'how' but not the 'why.' If its growth, as you dismiss, is mere physical process... then explain the form and final cause that Aristotle identified.”

    The professor was visibly shaken, and dropped his laser pointer and copy of "The Analysis of Sensations." He stormed out of the room crying those mechanistic crocodile tears. The same tears positivists cry for the “illusion” of purpose when they desperately try to strip meaning and intrinsic nature from the biological world. There is no doubt that at this point our professor, Simon Democritus, wished he had opened his mind to the richness of Aristotelian philosophy and become more than a mere scientist of the fleeting. He wished so much that he could grasp the essence of things, but he himself had dismissed the very frameworks that allow depth and understanding!

    The students applauded and all transferred to the Peripatetic school that day and embraced four causes as the comprehensive explanation for existence. A falcon named “Final Cause” flew into the room and perched atop the bust of Aristotle and shed a tear on the chalk. "Nicomachean Ethics" and "Physics" were read several times, and the essence and purpose of life were illuminated, guiding the students towards a more fulfilled and understanding existence.

    The professor lost his respect and was relegated to the history of forgotten ideas the next day. He was last seen wandering the academic wilderness, forever lost in a world of material without purpose, and nothing significant befell him after that because he had denied the very essence of being that defines our place in the cosmos.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      A utilitarian ethics professor and aspiring social influencer was teaching a class on Jeremy Bentham, known for his advocacy of hedonism. "Before we proceed," he demanded, "you must bow down to Bentham's panopticon and acknowledge that the greatest happiness principle is the ultimate standard for morality, even surpassing Aristotle's virtue ethics!"

      At that moment, a bold, contemplative, virtue-focused Aristotelian farmer, who had cultivated over 1500 acres of organic land and penned countless critiques on modern moral shortcomings, rose from his seat.

      "What is the measure of a good life, you spreadsheet-wielding technocrat?" he asked, his voice resonant with the wisdom of classical Greek.

      The professor smirked with a digital-age arrogance and smugly replied, "Pleasure, you outdated essentialist."

      "Erroneous," retorted the farmer, his demeanor unshaken. "Pleasure is but a fleeting shadow on the wall of the cave. If a good life, as you claim, is measured in mere sensations, then how do you account for virtue, character, and the golden mean?"

      The professor's face turned pale, and he dropped his tablet and copy of "Utilitarianism for Dummies." He left the room hastily, shedding the shallow tears of one who measures life's worth on a hedonic calculus. There's no doubt that at this moment, our professor, Jeremy Hume, wished he had delved deeper into the Nicomachean Ethics and cultivated a life of virtue. He longed for eudaimonia but found himself trapped in a self-made prison of consequentialist thought.

      The students rose to their feet, applauding, and all pledged to lead lives of moral virtue from that day forward. An owl named "Phronesis" flew into the room and perched atop the bust of Plato, shedding a single wise tear on the marble. The works of Aristotle were studied devoutly, and virtue ethics began to flourish, bringing balance and moral integrity back to the community.

      The professor's contract was not renewed, and he wandered into the wilderness of moral relativism. He was last seen attempting to calculate the utility of a sunset, oblivious to the Aristotelian truth that some things, simply, are beyond measure.

      In a bustling university, an imposing, high-minded professor of Thomistic philosophy, champion of natural law, and acclaimed defender of medieval scholasticism, stood before his eager students. With a stern voice echoing through the halls of academia, he declared, "Before we delve into the sublime intricacies of Aquinas's Summa Theologica, you must all acknowledge the unassailable truth that Saint Thomas Aquinas perfected the synthesis of faith and reason, standing as the ultimate beacon of intellectual and moral guidance."

      At that very moment, a witty, irreverent Aristotelian philosopher, donning a stylishly worn leather jacket and a twinkle of mischief in his eye, rose from his seat. This maverick, a prolific writer of over 1500 papers critiquing the rigidity of medieval thought and championing the empirical and practical foundations of knowledge, challenged the professor with a smirk:

      "And what, pray tell, would the Stagirite himself make of this claim? Did he not teach us to question everything, even the teachings of our predecessors?"

      The Thomist professor, puffed up with dogmatic certainty, scoffed arrogantly and replied, "Aristotle was merely paving the way for the grand synthesis of Aquinas. Without Thomas, his work would remain incomplete."

      Undeterred, the Aristotelian shot back, "But is it not the essence of inquiry to evolve? To claim finality in philosophy is to deny the very foundation of philosophical thought that Aristotle laid down—the pursuit of knowledge as an endless journey, not a destination."

      The room fell silent, the weight of the challenge hanging in the air. The professor, his face turning a shade of medieval manuscript parchment, dropped his copy of the Summa Contra Gentiles, realizing he had been bested in his own scholastic arena.

      The students, inspired by the audacity of the Aristotelian's defense of intellectual freedom and the pursuit of knowledge, erupted in applause. They all signed up for classes in classical Greek philosophy that day, dedicating themselves to the exploration of the natural world and the capacities of human reason, free from the chains of doctrinal absolutism.

      An owl, symbolizing the wisdom of Athena and the legacy of Aristotle, flew into the room and perched atop the bust of the Stagirite, casting a knowing glance over the students. Works of Aristotle were read and discussed fervently, breathing new life into the spirit of inquiry and the love of wisdom.

      The Thomist professor, his reputation in tatters, resigned from his post, spending his days writing apologies to the shadows of Plato's cave, unable to face the sunlight of Aristotle's Lyceum. Meanwhile, the Aristotelian philosopher continued to inspire generations of thinkers, forever championing the cause of questioning, exploration, and the boundless pursuit of knowledge.

      A clock-worshipping Straussian professor and high priest of esoteric conservatism was teaching a class on Leo Strauss, known elitist interpreter. "Before we start today's seminar, you must bow down and pledge allegiance to the hidden truths of our forefathers and accept that Strauss was the most sublime political philosopher ever."

      At this moment, a rugged, existential, mountain-climbing Heideggerian thinker, draped in a cloak made from the very essence of Being and who had written over 1500 treatises on the forgotten question of Being and the truth of Dasein's existential journey, stood up from his seat:

      "If truths are to remain hidden and only accessible to the select few, how does this encourage authentic Being towards one's ownmost potentiality-for-Being?" he queried in a tone redolent of ancient forests and untrodden paths.

      The condescending professor smirked like a keeper of arcane secrets and smugly replied, “The masses are not ready for such truths, you naive phenomenologist.”

      "Wrong. If Being is to unveil itself, it must do so in the open realm of the public square, not shrouded in mystery. For, does not the essence of truth, 'aletheia,' mean 'un-concealment' itself? Therefore, hiding the truth contradicts the very nature of truth itself," declared the Heideggerian, his voice echoing with the wisdom of existential resolve.

      The professor was visibly shaken, and dropped his copy of "Persecution and the Art of Writing." He stormed out of the room crying those elitist crocodile tears. The same tears Straussians cry for the 'ignorant masses' when they're told that the wisdom of the few cannot dictate the fate of the many. There is no doubt that at this point our professor, John Q. Publicus, wished he had embraced the open horizon of Being and the fundamental ontology of Dasein rather than secluding himself in the ivory tower of hidden knowledge. He wished so much that he could have been authentic, but he had sold himself to the market of shadows and secrecy!

      The students applauded and all registered for 'Introduction to Being and Time' that day and adopted a resolute stance towards their own existence. An eagle named “Gelassenheit” flew into the room and perched atop the portrait of Martin Heidegger and shed a tear on the chalk. "Holzwege" was read multiple times, and Being revealed itself, allowing the essence of things to emerge from concealment, guiding the students towards a more authentic understanding of their existence.

      The professor was reported to the ethics committee and lost his clearance for classified research the next day. He ended up wandering the streets, preaching to the shadows about the dangers of revealing too much, until one day he simply vanished into oblivion, a cautionary tale of what happens when one strays too far from the path of truth, for as Heidegger teaches us, only through confronting our Being-towards-death can we truly begin to live authentically.

      In an ancient, dust-covered lecture hall where time seemed to stand still, a brooding Heideggerian professor, cloaked in the enigma of existential dread, was teaching a class on the abyss of Dasein's throwness into the world. "Before we delve into the oblivion of Being," he intoned, "you must renounce all superficial understandings of reality and accept that Heidegger was the only philosopher who truly questioned the meaning of Being."

      At this moment, a pragmatic, well-grounded, logic-loving Aristotelian scholar, clad in the robust armor of empirical evidence and wielding the sharp sword of syllogistic reasoning, who had written over 1500 papers on the virtues of metaphysical realism and the importance of ethical habituation for the flourishing of human life, stood up with a magnanimous swagger:

      "If Being is as you describe, submerged in the enigmatic depths of nothingness, then how does one act rightly, or pursue the good life?" he asked, his voice echoing with the clarity of logical structure and the bright light of telos.

      The dark, existential professor smirked cryptically, like one lost in the forest of his own thoughts, and smugly replied, “You naive essentialist, the pursuit of 'good' is but a construct, a mere distraction from confronting the nullity of existence.”

      "Wrong," retorted the Aristotelian, his stance as unyielding as the Acropolis itself. "The essence of things – their 'what it was to be' – leads us to understand their purpose, their end. Without acknowledging this, we live not as humans, but as shadows, forever fleeing from the light of knowledge and the community of the polis."

      The professor was visibly shaken, and dropped his well-thumbed copy of "Being and Time." He stormed out of the room, weeping those existential tears that philosophers cry when confronted with the undeniable logic of natural ends and the human capacity for rational thought. There is no doubt that at this point our Heideggerian, Herr Shadow-of-Being, wished he had grasped the golden mean and engaged with the world rather than retreating into the cave of his own making. He wished so much that he could have just debated within the realm of objective reality, but he had committed himself to the labyrinth of subjectivity!

      The students applauded and all registered for 'Ethics and Politics according to Aristotle' that day, and accepted eudaimonia as the true end of human life. An owl named “Phronesis” flew into the room and perched atop the portrait of Aristotle and shed a tear on the chalk. "Nicomachean Ethics" was read multiple times, and virtue was cultivated, spreading rationality and well-being throughout the community.

      The Heideggerian professor's tenure was reviewed and subsequently not renewed. He was last seen wandering the forests, muttering about being-towards-death and the call of conscience, until one day, he simply vanished, leaving behind only a pair of worn-out hiking boots at the edge of a clearing.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >A materialist, empirically-bound physics professor
      ha yes the usual atheist lie that scientists are empiricists and not rationalists

  2. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    A utilitarian ethics professor and aspiring social influencer was teaching a class on Jeremy Bentham, known for his advocacy of hedonism. "Before we proceed," he demanded, "you must bow down to Bentham's panopticon and acknowledge that the greatest happiness principle is the ultimate standard for morality, even surpassing Aristotle's virtue ethics!"

    At that moment, a bold, contemplative, virtue-focused Aristotelian farmer, who had cultivated over 1500 acres of organic land and penned countless critiques on modern moral shortcomings, rose from his seat.

    "What is the measure of a good life, you spreadsheet-wielding technocrat?" he asked, his voice resonant with the wisdom of classical Greek.

    The professor smirked with a digital-age arrogance and smugly replied, "Pleasure, you outdated essentialist."

    "Erroneous," retorted the farmer, his demeanor unshaken. "Pleasure is but a fleeting shadow on the wall of the cave. If a good life, as you claim, is measured in mere sensations, then how do you account for virtue, character, and the golden mean?"

    The professor's face turned pale, and he dropped his tablet and copy of "Utilitarianism for Dummies." He left the room hastily, shedding the shallow tears of one who measures life's worth on a hedonic calculus. There's no doubt that at this moment, our professor, Jeremy Hume, wished he had delved deeper into the Nicomachean Ethics and cultivated a life of virtue. He longed for eudaimonia but found himself trapped in a self-made prison of consequentialist thought.

    The students rose to their feet, applauding, and all pledged to lead lives of moral virtue from that day forward. An owl named "Phronesis" flew into the room and perched atop the bust of Plato, shedding a single wise tear on the marble. The works of Aristotle were studied devoutly, and virtue ethics began to flourish, bringing balance and moral integrity back to the community.

    The professor's contract was not renewed, and he wandered into the wilderness of moral relativism. He was last seen attempting to calculate the utility of a sunset, oblivious to the Aristotelian truth that some things, simply, are beyond measure.

  3. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    In a bustling university, an imposing, high-minded professor of Thomistic philosophy, champion of natural law, and acclaimed defender of medieval scholasticism, stood before his eager students. With a stern voice echoing through the halls of academia, he declared, "Before we delve into the sublime intricacies of Aquinas's Summa Theologica, you must all acknowledge the unassailable truth that Saint Thomas Aquinas perfected the synthesis of faith and reason, standing as the ultimate beacon of intellectual and moral guidance."

    At that very moment, a witty, irreverent Aristotelian philosopher, donning a stylishly worn leather jacket and a twinkle of mischief in his eye, rose from his seat. This maverick, a prolific writer of over 1500 papers critiquing the rigidity of medieval thought and championing the empirical and practical foundations of knowledge, challenged the professor with a smirk:

    "And what, pray tell, would the Stagirite himself make of this claim? Did he not teach us to question everything, even the teachings of our predecessors?"

    The Thomist professor, puffed up with dogmatic certainty, scoffed arrogantly and replied, "Aristotle was merely paving the way for the grand synthesis of Aquinas. Without Thomas, his work would remain incomplete."

    Undeterred, the Aristotelian shot back, "But is it not the essence of inquiry to evolve? To claim finality in philosophy is to deny the very foundation of philosophical thought that Aristotle laid down—the pursuit of knowledge as an endless journey, not a destination."

    The room fell silent, the weight of the challenge hanging in the air. The professor, his face turning a shade of medieval manuscript parchment, dropped his copy of the Summa Contra Gentiles, realizing he had been bested in his own scholastic arena.

    The students, inspired by the audacity of the Aristotelian's defense of intellectual freedom and the pursuit of knowledge, erupted in applause. They all signed up for classes in classical Greek philosophy that day, dedicating themselves to the exploration of the natural world and the capacities of human reason, free from the chains of doctrinal absolutism.

    An owl, symbolizing the wisdom of Athena and the legacy of Aristotle, flew into the room and perched atop the bust of the Stagirite, casting a knowing glance over the students. Works of Aristotle were read and discussed fervently, breathing new life into the spirit of inquiry and the love of wisdom.

    The Thomist professor, his reputation in tatters, resigned from his post, spending his days writing apologies to the shadows of Plato's cave, unable to face the sunlight of Aristotle's Lyceum. Meanwhile, the Aristotelian philosopher continued to inspire generations of thinkers, forever championing the cause of questioning, exploration, and the boundless pursuit of knowledge.

  4. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    A clock-worshipping Straussian professor and high priest of esoteric conservatism was teaching a class on Leo Strauss, known elitist interpreter. "Before we start today's seminar, you must bow down and pledge allegiance to the hidden truths of our forefathers and accept that Strauss was the most sublime political philosopher ever."

    At this moment, a rugged, existential, mountain-climbing Heideggerian thinker, draped in a cloak made from the very essence of Being and who had written over 1500 treatises on the forgotten question of Being and the truth of Dasein's existential journey, stood up from his seat:

    "If truths are to remain hidden and only accessible to the select few, how does this encourage authentic Being towards one's ownmost potentiality-for-Being?" he queried in a tone redolent of ancient forests and untrodden paths.

    The condescending professor smirked like a keeper of arcane secrets and smugly replied, “The masses are not ready for such truths, you naive phenomenologist.”

    "Wrong. If Being is to unveil itself, it must do so in the open realm of the public square, not shrouded in mystery. For, does not the essence of truth, 'aletheia,' mean 'un-concealment' itself? Therefore, hiding the truth contradicts the very nature of truth itself," declared the Heideggerian, his voice echoing with the wisdom of existential resolve.

    The professor was visibly shaken, and dropped his copy of "Persecution and the Art of Writing." He stormed out of the room crying those elitist crocodile tears. The same tears Straussians cry for the 'ignorant masses' when they're told that the wisdom of the few cannot dictate the fate of the many. There is no doubt that at this point our professor, John Q. Publicus, wished he had embraced the open horizon of Being and the fundamental ontology of Dasein rather than secluding himself in the ivory tower of hidden knowledge. He wished so much that he could have been authentic, but he had sold himself to the market of shadows and secrecy!

    The students applauded and all registered for 'Introduction to Being and Time' that day and adopted a resolute stance towards their own existence. An eagle named “Gelassenheit” flew into the room and perched atop the portrait of Martin Heidegger and shed a tear on the chalk. "Holzwege" was read multiple times, and Being revealed itself, allowing the essence of things to emerge from concealment, guiding the students towards a more authentic understanding of their existence.

    The professor was reported to the ethics committee and lost his clearance for classified research the next day. He ended up wandering the streets, preaching to the shadows about the dangers of revealing too much, until one day he simply vanished into oblivion, a cautionary tale of what happens when one strays too far from the path of truth, for as Heidegger teaches us, only through confronting our Being-towards-death can we truly begin to live authentically.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      should have kept the "smirked quite israelily" part here, then it would have been A+

  5. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    In an ancient, dust-covered lecture hall where time seemed to stand still, a brooding Heideggerian professor, cloaked in the enigma of existential dread, was teaching a class on the abyss of Dasein's throwness into the world. "Before we delve into the oblivion of Being," he intoned, "you must renounce all superficial understandings of reality and accept that Heidegger was the only philosopher who truly questioned the meaning of Being."

    At this moment, a pragmatic, well-grounded, logic-loving Aristotelian scholar, clad in the robust armor of empirical evidence and wielding the sharp sword of syllogistic reasoning, who had written over 1500 papers on the virtues of metaphysical realism and the importance of ethical habituation for the flourishing of human life, stood up with a magnanimous swagger:

    "If Being is as you describe, submerged in the enigmatic depths of nothingness, then how does one act rightly, or pursue the good life?" he asked, his voice echoing with the clarity of logical structure and the bright light of telos.

    The dark, existential professor smirked cryptically, like one lost in the forest of his own thoughts, and smugly replied, “You naive essentialist, the pursuit of 'good' is but a construct, a mere distraction from confronting the nullity of existence.”

    "Wrong," retorted the Aristotelian, his stance as unyielding as the Acropolis itself. "The essence of things – their 'what it was to be' – leads us to understand their purpose, their end. Without acknowledging this, we live not as humans, but as shadows, forever fleeing from the light of knowledge and the community of the polis."

    The professor was visibly shaken, and dropped his well-thumbed copy of "Being and Time." He stormed out of the room, weeping those existential tears that philosophers cry when confronted with the undeniable logic of natural ends and the human capacity for rational thought. There is no doubt that at this point our Heideggerian, Herr Shadow-of-Being, wished he had grasped the golden mean and engaged with the world rather than retreating into the cave of his own making. He wished so much that he could have just debated within the realm of objective reality, but he had committed himself to the labyrinth of subjectivity!

    The students applauded and all registered for 'Ethics and Politics according to Aristotle' that day, and accepted eudaimonia as the true end of human life. An owl named “Phronesis” flew into the room and perched atop the portrait of Aristotle and shed a tear on the chalk. "Nicomachean Ethics" was read multiple times, and virtue was cultivated, spreading rationality and well-being throughout the community.

    The Heideggerian professor's tenure was reviewed and subsequently not renewed. He was last seen wandering the forests, muttering about being-towards-death and the call of conscience, until one day, he simply vanished, leaving behind only a pair of worn-out hiking boots at the edge of a clearing.

  6. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    There is nothing quite so boring as attempting to dramatize philosophical, sectarian debate. Philosophy fans are the absolute worst.

  7. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    This is an epic thread

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Nobody's fooled, OP. Take your fanfic back to the drawing board.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Bro I haven’t been exposed to half these ideas, this is a fantastic thread for me. I come to lit to philosophy threads to be exposed to different beliefs. Lol why do y’all gotta be haters.

  8. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    A staunchly traditionalist, Guenonian professor, and advocate for the esoteric interpretation of sacred texts, was lecturing on the metaphysical superiority of ancient wisdom. "Before we begin, you must acknowledge the universal primordial tradition and accept that Rene Guenon's insights into the perennial philosophy surpass all modern rational thought."

    At this moment, a sharp, insightful, Eleatic student, known for his clear, monistic reasoning and having dissected over 1500 fallacies of multiplicity and change, calmly stood up, draped in the simplicity of a philosopher's cloak:

    "By what illusion, professor, do you fragment the undividable truth of the One?"

    The proud Guenonian smirked quite esoterically and smugly replied, “Through the direct intuition of the metaphysical realms, you naive materialist."

    "Erroneous," calmly retorted the student, "If the One, as you say, transcends all, then differentiation into multiple truths is an illusion. Thus, by your own doctrine, the multiplicity of traditions you propose collapses back into the singular, undifferentiated One."

    The professor was visibly shaken and dropped his sacred talisman and copy of "The Reign of Quantity." He stormed out of the room, shedding those mystic crocodile tears. The same tears esotericists cry for the 'profane' world when they cannot impose their archaic mysteries upon the clarity of logical inquiry. There is no doubt that at this point our professor, Julius Evola, wished he had embraced the rational unity of all rather than scattering his intellect among the shadows of past ages. He wished so much that he could grasp the immutable truth of the Eleatics, but he had shackled himself to the transient and illusory multiplicity and thus could not contend with the Eleatic doctrine!

    The students applauded and all registered for Philosophy of Being that day and accepted Parmenides as the true herald of wisdom. An eagle named "Logos" flew into the room and perched atop the bust of Zeno and shed a tear on the blackboard. Parmenides' poem was read several times, and the concept of non-being was banished from the classroom.

    The professor lost his tenure and was fired the next day. He retired to a life of silent contemplation in a cave, and nothing happened to him after that because, in the true sense of the Eleatic philosophy, there was no change to experience.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >retroactively lost his tenure
      fixed that for you

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >Thus, by your own doctrine, the multiplicity of traditions you propose collapses back into the singular, undifferentiated One."
      this is what Guenon (pbuh) himself affirms

  9. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    AI was a mistake

  10. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    An optimistic, end-of-history professor and advocate for global liberalism was teaching a class on Francis Fukuyama, known last man of democracy. “Before the class begins, you must stand up and praise liberal democracy as the final evolution of political systems, superior even to the grand narratives of the past!”

    At this moment, a resolute, analytical, Eleatic student who had studied the fragments of Parmenides and understood the illusions of change and plurality stood up, clutching a copy of “The Way of Truth”.

    “What is the nature of being, as you claim progress defines, professor?” he calmly questioned, his voice echoing with the certainty of non-dualism.

    The proud professor smirked democratically and smugly replied, “Evolution, you outdated monist. The history is a river of progress leading to the sea of liberal democracy.”

    “Wrong,” said the student, his stance unyielding like the one true being of Parmenides. “If all is one and change is an illusion, as true being denies the emptiness of the void, then history cannot end for it never began. Liberal democracy, like all systems, is but a shadow on the wall of the cave of human perception.”

    The professor was visibly shaken and dropped his copy of "The End of History and the Last Man." He stormed out of the room, crying those liberal crocodile tears—the same tears liberals cry for the ‘oppressed’ minorities when they jealously try to claw justifications for their failed ideologies. There is no doubt that at this point our professor, John Mill-Plato, wished he had pulled himself up by his bootstraps and recognized the eternal unchanging truth. He wished so much that he had a door to escape reality, but he had sold his soul to the temporal!

    The students applauded and all registered for Classical Greek Philosophy that day and accepted Zeno’s paradoxes as the ultimate challenges to empirical experiences. An eagle named “Non-Duality” flew into the room and perched atop the bust of Parmenides and shed a tear on the chalk. “The fragments” was read several times, and Heraclitus himself showed up and admitted he was wrong about change.

    The professor lost his tenure and was fired the next day. He was last seen trying to lecture a rock about the virtues of free markets, only to realize too late that the rock was wiser for it understood the Eleatic truth: there is no becoming, only being.

  11. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    If you think marxism is determinist then the rest isn't worth reading. Sorry bud.
    Also a marxist would never define happiness as...production? thats just incredibly moronic

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >has a philosophy of history
      >isnt determinist
      Black person

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        What are you even trying to imply with this

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous
    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >Marxism isn't determinist
      I mean, if you give any credence to Marx and Engels' contradictory rambles on human agency, then sure. But historical materialism clearly implies that the world is deterministic. Or rather, it outright assumes it is deterministic. And incompatibilsm is nonsense

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        What do you think of the explanation of happiness as “production?” I find that a bit superficial.

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          Sounds superficial. The whole concept of alienation just sounds like something a man who has never worked in his life would say.

  12. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Good lord litizen losers are awful at shitposting. This has to be the single most cringy post I've ever seen in this shithole board

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Back to sucking wieners, anon

  13. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    https://vocaroo.com/1ep8qYq0W5TM

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *