>age. >current book. >your thoughts on it

>age
>current book
>your thoughts on it

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  1. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    23, infinite jest, it's quite dark and funny.

  2. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    32
    Taoist Secrets Of Love - Cultivating The Male Sexual Energy

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      nice man, my info would be you 10 years ago exactly!
      42, Fusion of the
      Five Elements
      Basic and Advanced Meditations
      for Transforming Negative Emotions
      Mantak Chia, harder than I thought it would be
      pic related was great though - last finished

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        >nice man, my info would be you 10 years ago exactly!
        So, have you grown spiritually by applying the methods in the books?

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          >have you grown spiritually by applying the methods in the books?
          Yes.
          Cultivating techniques and control over sexuality are a real deal. Surfing on the orgasmic wave is quite great in of itself, the control you exert over your most basic forms of behaviour ...
          As for spiritual growth ... I would say Universal Dao is not enough. Master Chia is also a Christian... But the method of the master is great in its aspect of significance.

  3. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    22
    A Death in Venice
    Quite beautiful. I had seen the film adaptation before, and I loved it. Some passages are incredibly beautiful.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >Some passages are incredibly beautiful.
      I bet you mean all the passages where Tadzio is on the screen, right?

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        No, I wept during those ones.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      The writing is pretty great but I can't look past the premise of some creepy old guy stalking a child around a city.

  4. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    29
    Dreams, Memories, Reflections
    It's touching and real, much more so than most people could comprehend

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Why is everybody reading Jung lately. Synchronicity?

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Illusory pattern perception

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        That's not what synchronicity means, but the reason is probably to do with social pressures and failing mainstream psychology forcing us to find something deeper and realer.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        20, Jung - Allgemeine Gesichtspunkte zur Psychologie des Traumes. Dream psychology has not progressed beyond Jung for fear of being labelled "pseudoscience"

        I'm reading Jung to understand dreams. but his alchemy stuff is whack

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Because he gets talked about here pretty often, ensuring more people check him out and thus more threads about him.
        Plus a lot of anons are big gamer nerds who like Persona so a lot probably heard of him from there whether they admit it or not.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        I just got done with Jung, actually

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        I love jung and hate freud

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          what? but why

  5. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >28
    >The Joke - Kundera
    >it's ok. I liked it up to the military prison for non communists. Then it's meh

  6. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    18
    On the Marble Cliffs
    Really like the atmosphere and the way it's written at the moment, though I've only just started

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      read it in german or have a nice day

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        I would rather not thank you

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Based book. My favorite Jünger so far. To enhance the experience, listen to this while reading it:

  7. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    30
    Revolt against the Modern World
    There's going to be 3-5k years of darkness ahead of the west. Possibly even 10k.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >didn't read evola in his 20s
      It's too late for you

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        >read evola at all
        Yeah mate your a chowderhead if you think anything he wrote’s worthwhile. Theres a reason he is only exalted by le right wing edgelords rather than truly great thinkers

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          Give it time, moron.

  8. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Through sheer fabric veil,
    Her ample treasure beckons,
    Inviting my touch.

  9. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >23
    >Dune
    it's cool so far, really interesting seeing the stuff that inspired lifeweb and by extension scorcher

  10. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Pic related, really enjoying it, it gives an indirect history of British India and their level of influence and control of different parts of the continent and how it shapes certain areas even today.
    Although it's exclusively focused on India and the growing/ trade of opium there at the moment, I'm hoping it eventually goes more into China and details the level of addiction and penetration opium had there.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      34
      Shogun
      Clavell likes to talk and it made a big chunk of Book 2 drag but it's flying by now. Every character is interesting and engaging

      going to look into this one, looks interesting

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Yeah give it a go, I'm really enjoying it, it's now started going into the Canton system in China and details how all the foreign merchants were sequestered in these factories outside the city during trading season.
        Also shows how Parsis, Armeniens and Middle-Eastern israelites became a big part of the shipping trade and how their stateless background perhaps made them more adept at it all, for example the Parsis in particular were able to mingle with Europeans at Canton whereas Indian Hindus and Muslims were more foreign to them due to stuff like dietary restrictions and because a lot of Indian merchants wouldn't travel overseas due to caste restrictions.
        Also apparently American merchants went heavy on the trade after independence as they were barred from trading with a lot of nearby British settlements, at one point they controlled up to a third of the opium travelling into China, and a lot of the fortunes of wealthy families around Boston and New York were made or at least rapidly grew because of opium.

  11. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >27
    >Swann's Way
    The second part (Swann in Love) is extremely good, I see myself in Swann, I understand exactly what he's going through.
    >The Count of Monte Cristo
    Really liking it as well.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >I see myself in Swann, I understand exactly what he's going through.
      A short-lived relationship of mine ended as I was reading the fourth and fifth volumes of ISOLT, in which Proust expands on the themes of Swann In Love. The girl in question had a resemblance to the object of Marcel's desires, and I read myself into the book so intensely it made me (I think) fall in love with the person I'd mutually broken up with, but a month or two too late.

  12. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Butt

  13. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >36
    >light in august
    Thoroughly enjoying the story itself but it kind of seems like taking the long way around to say “Black folk gonna nig”

  14. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    28, Reverend Insanity, translation is weird but so far I am liking it.

  15. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    37

    The Lord Of The Rings

    This will be my third time reading LOTR over the course of my life. I'm actually reading it somewhat for research purposes, since I plan to include a character from Tolkien in a work of my own that I'm writing, as a kind of metafictional commentary. So I'm rereading LOTR to make sure I write them properly.

    But it's always nice to go back to Middle-Earth. I only just finished "A Long Expected Party" the other day, but already I'm enjoying myself all over again. One thing that comes through in the books but not really in the movies is that some of the hobbits are quite witty, especially Frodo and Merry. They're not just dumb comic relief, like the Jackson movies often make them out to be; at least two of the four are quite sharp, and will give as good as they get in banter when the opportunity arises.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      25
      Father Goriot
      I like it so far, Vautrin and Goriot are compelling foils. I'm wondering whether Eugene will go awry or not.

      The hardest I have laughed at a book is when Merry and Pip greet Theoden, Aragorn etc after defeating Saruman. I was in tears!

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        There's a Gobseck short story you might want to check out once you finish. It shares the same tone and gives closure to one of the character.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      The movies are just teen action blockbusters and are just big budget LotR fanfics. You mention witty - for sure. And wise. And Gandalf is not simply nice old man, he is crotchety and short-tempered. I only see joy and hope in the world of the book, but the movies are so slow and sad. The book also has songs, of which there are basically zero in the movies.
      I am basically always reading Tolkien, and fall asleep to the Silmarillion audiobook often. Currently have HoMe on Pause (volume 6), and in LotR am in Rohan, mustering the Eorlingas on my way to Helm's Deep. Having just read it: one of my favourite parts is the hoom hom slow ents becoming excited and their war song. There is even a recording of Tolkien singing their marching war song. I like to believe that, after the War of the Ring, the hobbits return to Fangorn, and inform them of Sam's cousin's sighting of an ent(wife) on the north moors, and as a result, that the old forests are replanted in the fourth age, among other things re-connecting The Old Forest and Fangorn, and reviving The Brown Lands and other places war left bare.

      Which character are you including in your work?

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Oh yeah, and the hobbits are also adults. Every adaptation which depicts them as children really bothers and shocks me. Frodo is a middle-aged man, and Sam isn't far behind. Also Aragorn doesn't have face hair, elf hair, Legolas is badass and muscular, and lots of other nitpicks which adapters usually get wrong.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Have you tried learning Quenya or Sindarin?

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          You can't really "learn" Quenya, it has too many layers. Sindarin doesn't have enough of a corpus to draw from. The closest you could get is a P.I.E.-type of mess, but nobody really bothers with that. But when you sperg out about Tolkien like I do, you inevitably just pick up on vocabulary and some patterns.

          I get books based on price. Plato is the only own I own right now

          I get it man, money is precious. But if you have a choice, maybe look into the cheapest options before picking up Plato randomly. Read some reviews if you wanna buy a book in the future. Save up for an ereader and hack that sucker, suddenly all the books.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            I'll just read the republic. I don't really care about reading. I'm just passing time hoping ill die

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        I don't understand why you feel that it didn't come across like that in the movies. I could feel all those characterizations and I think the movie is much more than a "teen action blockbuster". The compromise between a truthful adaptation and a commercial product for a broad audience is incredibly well done.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      I just finished Lego LOTR and I'll be honest - it's my main source of LOTR since I watched the movies a long time ago and have since forgotten them and I've never read the books. It's still cozy.

  16. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    22
    The Silver Dove
    I'm really not sure why I'm reading it. It's somewhat cute in its prose stylings, but I'm not very engaged with whats going on.

  17. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    34, reading Women and Men by McElroy.
    Interesting but this shit is fricking dense. The pieces are coming together slowly.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      So it's like a jigsaw puzzle.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Kinda yeah. The narratives are vaguely connected, its fun trying to figure out whats going on.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >this shit is fricking dense
      And badly written.

  18. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    23, Metamorphosis. Made me feel sad and a bit angry

  19. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >age
    24
    >current book
    musui's story: the autobiography of a tokugawa samurai
    >your thoughts on it
    it's okay. the antics he gets up to are kinda fun.

  20. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    STOP POSTING ATTRACTIVE FEET

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      The feet is what caught your eye and not her exposed anal glands? gay!

  21. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    24
    wind up bird chronicle
    a slow read but engaging and really intriguing so far

  22. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    40
    Re-reading Dune
    I like it a lot until he drinks the water of life. Everything after that is too compressed and the supernatural elements aren't my favorite.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >Everything after that is too compressed
      Everything before that is compressed, too. The entire events of the book span less than two weeks, not counting the timeskip.

  23. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    23. don quixote. p funny so far but i'm wondering if the joke ever evolves (~20% through)

  24. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    23
    Spring Snow (Mishima)
    I'm really enjoying it so far, about a third into it and I'd say it's my second favorite Mishima novel so far (behind Temple of the Golden Pavilion)

  25. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    24
    Austerlitz. I like getting myself carried away by long winding paragraphs only to get my gut punched by epiphany and this book delivers bangers after bangers. A slow burn for sure, idyllic and monumental, but very rewarding. A mix of Kokoro and In Search of Lost Time.
    Naked Lunch. Seriously wtf. I think I'm finally starting getting the hang of it but still what the frick.
    Read the two after three months of reading slump, feels nice to get back, the books I was reading when I got burnt out being A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man and Beckett's Trilogy and probably will tackle them again when I'm finished with these.

  26. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    21, Odyssey (Voß translation), not much other than the awkward meter.
    Is there an autist who could recommend me a good commentary?

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Seth Benardete "Bow and the Lyre"

      https://i.imgur.com/jUvqwae.jpg

      >age
      >current book
      >your thoughts on it

      21, also reading Spring Snow

      23
      Spring Snow (Mishima)
      I'm really enjoying it so far, about a third into it and I'd say it's my second favorite Mishima novel so far (behind Temple of the Golden Pavilion)

      It's a bit too neurotic for my tastes but interesting. Kind of like if Julien Sorel were more emotionally turbulent

  27. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    > 29
    > How to Read a Page
    Thoughts: I'm a moron.

  28. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    > 22
    > "Religion and Nothingness" by Keiji Nishitani
    > Seeing how one could reconcile the problem of Nihilism in western philosophy with the concept of sunyatta ("absolute emptiness) in Buddhism is fascinating to read about.

  29. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >35
    >Big Sur by Kerouac
    >I like it a lot. I just started it but it’s in a similar vein as The Dharma Bums, which I love, albeit Big Sur seems more from a cynical and jaded standpoint. I’ve voiced my thoughts on Kerouac before that I think he is one of the most misunderstood and most tragic figures in literature. It’s a shame he gets thrown in with the wanderlust, hedonistic beat crowd…that’s a shallow interpretation of Kerouac and what he was after. He was always on a spiritual quest but he lost. His lust for life and borderline naive and juvenile early work takes on an extra depressing feel as the world beats him down. The change from his early work till his later work is hard to swallow at times as you are seeing the light taken behind Kerouac’s eyes
    >Also rereading Zhuangzi, who I love, and the less said about him the better as he pretty much speaks for himself

  30. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Stop posting lust provoking feet.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      It's my bi-monthly tradition to post these threads and let the beauty of female feet keep this board alive.

  31. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    > 26
    > Moby Dick
    > Rereading, love it
    I actually have a terrible habit of rereading and rereading the same books. I've been rereading the same five books for like the last 2 years with an ever expanding to read list then I hardly get to.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      I had to drop it a year ago because I had to take meds. So close to finishing it but my brain was kind of a mush and I've been holding it off for an embarrassingly long time. So tell me, is there a a lot callback to the part before the carpenter chapter? I mean I'm fine with rereading some chapters, but I just have to get the reading all set up cause I want to do it in one sitting.

  32. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    40
    We Few
    It's OK, I guess. The final book of the Empire of Man series. You can always spot Ringo's work because his self insert character starts telling everyone how much better his is than them and then ALWAYS backs it up by being smarter/stronger/faster than everyone else.

  33. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Neuromancer
    quite good, but the ending is not happy it's morbid as frick

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      If it makes you feel better, the third book in the series gives a little insight into what Case is up to after Neuromancer and it went pretty well all things considered.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      20
      >king lear
      I should have picked up a bilingual edition because I'm ESL and much of the terminology is flying over my head, but the story itself it's quite interesting, I expecially like how the family backstabbing affects both Lear and Gloucester, it's a nice parallel between the two.
      >Poems and Prose - Christina Rossetti
      Early peotry it's nice for it's lyrical quality and not much else, I hope that the works published around the same time as Goblin Market will be more fullfilling.
      Not read any prose besides 3 short stories yet and they were quite meh.

      That book just starts off with a great line and with each succesive one it just gets more uninteresting and bland.
      I should probability give Gibson another try.

      31
      The sound and the fury
      goddamn this motherfricker is confusing as hell. just finished as i lay dying too which was about 200% more cohesive

      Just finished As i lay dying too, my first Faulkner and i found it quite great even if i had some trouble understanding all the hick spelling, is tSatF the same?

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Neuromancer took a bit to click for me, but when it did I read the other two books in about two days.

  34. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    31
    The sound and the fury
    goddamn this motherfricker is confusing as hell. just finished as i lay dying too which was about 200% more cohesive

  35. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    > 20
    > Infinite Jest
    Got a <100 pages left. I'm only finishing it so I can say I finished it. The past 200 pages have been shameful, and not in a non-resolution post-modern way, but like it's terrible writing and plot, unfunny and nnothing to offer. The Ulysses dream attempt was agonizing. I re-read the first third of the book about 5 times and I remember how good it was and how excited I was to read it, especially the opening chapter.

  36. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >25
    >Demons
    >Wish I took French instead of German in school

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >25
      >Franz Kafka's Metamorphosis
      I was previously reading The Possessed (aka Demons) like but decided to put it down in favor of something shorter, because my attention span has been destroyed by recent illness and the intensive imageboard use from that. I liked The Possessed— my quitting from it has nothing to do with its enormously detailed description of the emotional and melodramatic Stepan Trofimovitch Verhovensky which I think was splendid, although I decided to download Makar's Dream because of the reference
      >dans le pays de Makar et de ses veaux,
      which made me feel as though I wouldn't understand the book without reading it. As for Kafka's book: it's fairly relatable so far. I love israelites, too bad they're also too based to let us live in peace...

  37. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    26

    about to start Shirley, I just read multiple introductions on the author and text. I just finished Jane Eyre and it was a masterpiece. I plan on reading most of the Brontë sisters' publications in due time, starting with Charlotte's.

  38. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    26
    The Tartar Steppe - Dino Buzzati
    Just started recently and finished chapter two. I'm loving the forshadowing and the atmosphere feels so unique. I've heard of the subject matter the story covers, and it seems like something I might heavily relate to.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Many anons find it depressing and “literally me” but I think there is actually reason for optimism when reading the book. I’m not sure if you know the gist of the book but I find that the symbolic idea of the book is almost a universal human truth, everyone experiences it to some extent, even those you wouldn’t expect. Emerson has a great relevant quote which I’ll paraphrase as we are our own boat and every other boat on the water seems more exciting than ours. Once you realize the implications, it is rather freeing and you stop looking towards others

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        I'm definitely aware that it's a lot more than just a story about solitude and loneliness. Also, not sure if this is accurate, but I have heard that there's similarities to Camus' The Myth of Sisyphus.

  39. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    36
    On Monsters
    It's pretty good, but there's some basic stuff that the author should have known, before writing such a book. Like he's not really aware that the Greek myths make it clear that humans aren't capable of mythic feats. So he wonders why the Greek didn't think it was possible for werewolves to be real, yet they believed in so many other things.
    Only the gods(and I'm sure some other non-human creatures) could shapeshift, so of course they wouldn't believe in werewolves. Humans couldn't do such a thing.

  40. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    20s
    I Shall Seal The Great Heavens
    Long as hell, treating as a time passer.

    Otherwise, Wuthering heights.
    Read about a quarter & I've been meaning to continue it. Absolutely loved it thus far

  41. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    23
    Ka, by Roberto Calasso
    Great stuff. Really enlightened and intellectual takes at the deepest lore of vedic religion.

  42. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I'm reading a biography. The author cradles his ball too much, if you do that at least make it worth watching.

  43. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >31
    >The Two Towers
    >I don't consider it a different book from Fellowship or King; Tolkien was right when he insisted that it should have been a single book. Fricking greed, man. With that out of the way, I can't give my opinion until I finish it (it being the three books). I'll be making a thread about it in the coming weeks, so look forward to it.

  44. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    18
    Sons and Lovers
    appreciate the rustic depiction of english rural life, but dislike the colloquial english dialogue, also feel as though the prose quality is quite uneven - otherwise decent

  45. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >25
    >The Sailor who fell from grace with the sea/The sword of the Lichtor
    Yukio's writing is short and beautiful. Can't help but feel that it comes off a bit Cormic'y which isn't bad, its def a style of writing i feel i tend towards in my own writing/Wolfe is very much the opposite, taking his time in describing(and avoiding description) as the character Severian retells a story to us from long ago. i love both, and am taking turns a week to read one then the other.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      I am rereading Sailor merely because I own the book and I am bored so I figured I would. So far in part one of two, the descriptions from Fusako of what it feels like to fall spontaneously in love do resonate with me but the character of the actual sailor and his emphasis on the masculinity of life at sea I found hokey as I also do with the weird kid and his gang of psychos torturing to death that cat. I know that Fusako in this metaphor represents the effeminate character of western liberal democracies and how they seek to bring Japan down from the inside not solely through warfare but though emasculation of the Japanese male’s character but even in his stupid and nonsensical metaphor I found myself rooting for her. I also laughed at the description of the hole in the wall that looks on into Fusako’s room where she undresses. The Asian kid’s first thought was that one of the evil blonde men who roomed there must have drilled the hole in to spy on her and to jerk off. I can only envision Noburu as pic related. That is exactly how the people on here would jump to weird race mixing assumptions if they came across a similar situation. It is on Noburu’s mind constantly because the author who created him was an emasculated proto-chud who had to take it out on American/ white men.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        interesting perspective on the characters, ill keep your words in mind as i read on with Yukio.

  46. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    20
    Norwegian Wood
    Dropped it halfway around the time I turned 18, giving Murakami another try

  47. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    21
    The Righteous Mind by Jonathan Haidt

  48. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    26
    Hadji Murat
    I am kind of understanding why Harold Bloom said that this book was his favorite work of literature ever. It’s only 100 pages but every chapter is a new application of form, technique and scenery. It’s absolutely incredible how much detail Tolstoy crams into every page, how many devices he uses to make every moment stand out. The opening alone blows my mind. It’s only a couple short pages and you could write a fricking essay about what he writes about and how he conveys it — metaphor, perspective, social criticism, melancholy, etc. Unbelievable how good he is.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      I don’t understand why Hadji Murat has the reputation of being one of the few late-era Tolstoy works that doesn’t moralize. On every page he is seething with bitter hatred of the Russian government. How is this not political, how is this not moralistic? Not that it’s bad, it’s about as perfect as a book could get, but it’s certainly not neutral.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Harold Bloom praised it so it has to be good

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          It's War and Peace but 120 pages instead of 1200. He is right to call it a sublime book.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            I don’t understand why Hadji Murat has the reputation of being one of the few late-era Tolstoy works that doesn’t moralize. On every page he is seething with bitter hatred of the Russian government. How is this not political, how is this not moralistic? Not that it’s bad, it’s about as perfect as a book could get, but it’s certainly not neutral.

            26
            Hadji Murat
            I am kind of understanding why Harold Bloom said that this book was his favorite work of literature ever. It’s only 100 pages but every chapter is a new application of form, technique and scenery. It’s absolutely incredible how much detail Tolstoy crams into every page, how many devices he uses to make every moment stand out. The opening alone blows my mind. It’s only a couple short pages and you could write a fricking essay about what he writes about and how he conveys it — metaphor, perspective, social criticism, melancholy, etc. Unbelievable how good he is.

            Perfect storytelling, pure and brilliant. "If the world could write itself, it would write like Tolstoy." The Death of Ivan Ilyich is great too.

  49. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    29
    Basic Writings anthology by Martin Heidegger
    Amazing stuff. He was a deep mystic and was probably Asian in a previous life.

  50. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    28 years old and Reading Moby Dick. I really like it, I'm just over half way through and can't think of another book that just continuously bombards you with interesting concepts and explores them as succinctly. It feels like Melville sold his soul to make something this good.

  51. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    32
    The House of the Spirits
    For some reason I find Magic Realism really funny. Perhaps a little long.

  52. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I don't read

  53. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >23
    >On War (Clausewitz)
    The more philosophical, logic based sections are mostly pointless, the rest is the kind of thing so essential and so integrated into modern thought that it seems pointless to read. I'll be glad to have read it... when I'm done. The debate being waged in the background (I assume) is probably the most interesting part, as with Sun Tzu.

  54. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    feeto sexo

  55. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    31
    >The Shadow of the Torturer
    Just started it, interesting writing so far.
    >The Case for Christ
    Interesting stuff but definitely written by a Christian pretending to be a skeptic who is easily convinced, and only interviews Christian scholars. But I expected this so it's fine.
    >Acts of the Apostles
    I've never read it before, I'm finding it really interesting.
    >Ted Hughes poetry
    Still on his early stuff, just finished Lupercal. Honestly most of it is not great but every now and then there's an excellent poem, nearly always about nature.

  56. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    41
    Clifford Geertz - Local Knowledge
    Not bad, so far hes explaining how the hermeneutical readings between two cultures can be coded in riddles and be so together yet so far in relation.

  57. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    rolling

  58. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    19, gravity's rainbow, I’m literally slothrop minus the wanting to frick a child.

  59. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    29
    A game of thrones
    Ok so far. A little slow perhaps

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Book 2 is brilliant, book 3 is almost as good.

  60. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >22
    >48 laws of power
    >good life lessons but i don't believe everything he says

  61. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >31
    >Cowpers translation of the Iliad
    >lucid and amazing

  62. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >30
    >Stella Maris
    it's enjoyable, I just like McCarthy. seems like an interesting story so far, though I'm only 20 pages in.

  63. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    34
    Child of God - McCarthy

    Just finished it. I liked it :3. Actually I find myself thinking most about the Waldrop character (the farmer who let Ballard squat in his old house). It seems clear from the few hints the book gives that Waldrop cared about Ballard (child from a neighbouring farming family who clearly fell on very hard times) and wanted to help him. I find myself wondering what Waldrop would have said to Ballard when they met after the old house burnt down when Ballard pretrended he was someone else. Interesting to think on how blind clearly Ballard is in the book to the notion that anyone in the outer world might actually be able or want to help him. Also interesting to think what might have come of his encounter with the blacksmith if Ballard had actually paid attention to him.

  64. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    26
    Sot-weed factor
    Really well written and hilarious, but i just want this dude to have something good happen. Whimsical dude just getting beat the frick down

  65. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >26
    >Anna Karenina
    >It's like Chinatown but for agriculture. It's almost conspiratorial. I thought it was a bit farm-focused at first but now that Alexei has uncovered the recourse funnelling away from the agriculture sector in government. Can't help but seeing him as Jack Nicholson. Someone even verbatim (almost) told him "That's Chinatown" at one point. It's like an economic thriller disguised as an adultery/romance.

  66. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Everyone 27 or younger on here should be executed. Total Zoomer death.

  67. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    24
    The Holy Bible
    After rejecting Christ for years, I'm back home

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      БOГ c тeб! Aмин!

  68. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I have begun reading multiples books, haven't finished any because I always get an unstoppable urge to jerk off

  69. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    The great gatsby
    18
    its nicely written. i mostly read it to avoid endless dopamine the internet brings. recently deleted my facebook accountaswell

  70. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >32
    >Hyperion
    It's alright I guess, I'm not sure what I was expecting but I didn't expect it to be a bunch of short stories strung together. I'm not very far into it and I've basically forgotten most of the nine characters names already.

  71. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    [...]

    You do know you will get banned for 2 years for admitting to being under 18 right?
    I'd delete this if I were you

  72. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    35
    The Rules of Attraction by Bret Easton Ellis
    It's pretty good

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      My copy turned out to be defective (has repeating chapters) so I dropped it. Now I'm reading The Great Mortality by John Kelly about the Black Death and it's an utter joy. It almost feels like I'm having too much fun with a book given the horrific subject matter but it's fantastic so far.

  73. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    23
    変態王子と笑わない猫 (Perverted Prince and the Cat Who Doesn't Smile)
    Unlike a lot of stuff I've been reading in JP, I've never read this one in English before. It's got surprisingly good prose, though. I wasn't expecting that at all.

    奥の細道 現代語訳 (Narrow Road to the Interior, Modern Translation)
    I'm still at the point where poetry just sounds better in English to me than in Japanese. I'm honestly afraid of potentially finding out I simply don't like Japanese poetry. It sounds so much better to me in translation, but of course that's probably hopefully only due a lack of understanding. I do love the travelogue sections in prose, so that's nice.

    また、同じ夢を見ていた (I Had That Same Dream Again)
    This is apparently a lot of JP learners' first novel, so I decided I'd give it a shot. I've been pleasantly surprised. It's a very charming story, and I just hope it doesn't completely go off the rails like so many of these newer novels love to do.

  74. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >30
    >platos republic
    Its too hard. I bought it because it was a dollar but I can't really c a re. I think I just don't care about this kind of talk

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Relatable. I keep coming back to it and dropping it. It's not entertaining in any way. It gets done better by others.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        I've never read anything else. I read Harry Potter in middle school and some of the old testament when I was out of high-school. I just bought the republic to kill time. It was the cheapest book I knew

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          Brother, the jump from Harry Potter to Plato is kind of steep. Books in translation, and books from a long time ago, are both usually a challenge anyway - and you've doubled up! Hard to recommend just based on this, but maybe something writen in the past century which piques your interest and other people seem to groove on.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            I get books based on price. Plato is the only own I own right now

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          And what a price! I paid fifteen bucks for mine.

  75. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >32
    >Problems of Leninism, by Stalin

    There was a definite spiritual element underpinning the Soviet movement in the early years that seems to be lacking in the later years. It kind of made me think, rather than treating political ideologies as separate things, that we should wrap them into larger spiritual tonal ideas.

    Like how Dionysian and Apollonian encapsulate general patterns. I honestly think we should have "deities" that capture these other ideas, like how Mehrunes Dagon in Elder Scrolls captures communism (rather intentionally, I believe).

  76. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    21
    Gormenghast (book)
    I hecking love long descriptions of ambient lighting, but really, I can't go a page without finding some fantastic arrangement of words seemingly crafted by a sagacious scholar or ardent naturalist.

  77. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    18
    The White Album
    I find it very beautifully written and love how Didion was able to tie all of her essays together even if they were tangentially related

  78. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    19
    The Shadow of the Torturer
    Only just started it, but it's good so far. I've gotten spoiled on some stuff before but tbh I don't care that much, worldbuilding is excellent.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Tolkiengay here, and Shadow of the Torturer is one of the only other "fantasy" books I've ever enjoyed. To me it felt like a real adventure finally again, and not just allegory and bad writing like most newer fantasy I try. The other fantasy book I liked was Howl's Moving Castle - it moves so fast, and is so imaginative. I wanna try Earthsea some day.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        The first 4 Earthsea books are ace. Not read the fifth, yet.

        If you like older fantasy, David Gemmell's Legend is flawed but good.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Shadow of the Torturer had a gripping premise, but the writing was awful.

  79. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    26
    Lord of the rings - the two towers
    Enthralling so far, peak comfy. Just finished flotsam and jetsam and laughed my ass off also frick captcha

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Frick captcha

      33
      The Bock Saga
      It’s very weird and also very interesting and there’s tons of semen eating.

      Disgusting f u

  80. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    29
    Dracula (first time)
    Can be intriguing but can be very boring and dated in some parts, also English is not my first language so I occasionally have a hard time keeping up with the dialects.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >Dracula
      1/2 of that book shouldn't even be in there. It's so damn repetitive. At least the first half or so + the ending is kino.

  81. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    33
    The Bock Saga
    It’s very weird and also very interesting and there’s tons of semen eating.

  82. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    19
    Sound of Waves
    I have no gf with cute feet

  83. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    36

    Shogun
    Succulent Prey
    If on a Winter's Night a Traveller

  84. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    9
    Finnegan's Wake
    I'm gay

  85. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    25
    Leaves of Grass
    Elegant and delightful

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Do you have a favorite poem from it? Or a favorite section of Song of Myself? I really like Section 6, "A child said What is the grass? fetching it to me with full hands;"

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        I just started it, but I really liked section 32
        "I think I could turn and live with animals, they are so placid and self-contain'd. I stand and look at them long and long. They do not sweat and whine about their condition, They do not lie awake in the dark and weep for their sins..."

  86. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    28
    Moby-Dick
    The whaling autism is real and I love it.

  87. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    25, Lifespan Why We Age - and Why We Don't Have To, It's interesting; I don't have a background in this so I am learning a lot.

  88. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    25. Moby Dick and e-girlta (Light of my life, fire of my loins).

  89. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    22. V. by Pynchon. I've had a few laughs and I've only read 30 pages yet.

  90. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    25, Illuminatus. I've never read anything that jumps around so chaotically.
    Just finished Evola's the Yoga of power. Interesting, has made me slightly more interested in paying attention to my active focus. Definitely will revisit this book in a year or so after I do some more practice on yoga and concentration.

  91. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    23
    Just finished Midnight Tides
    Absolutely loved it, Tehol and Bugg are some of my favorite silly boys in SFF, and Rhulad is a super tragic character, loved his arc. Regardless of how I end up feeling about future stuff, it's honestly crazy that Erikson is able to introduce 3 entirely different continents with their own histories and cultures and give them all compelling stories and characters.

  92. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    25
    Watership Down
    I like rabbits 🙂

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      I HATE RABBITS
      I'm just kidding, I like them, this seems interesting.

      https://i.imgur.com/jUvqwae.jpg

      >age
      >current book
      >your thoughts on it

      (OP)
      18
      Behold, a pale horse
      I've already read quite a bit on conspiracy "theories" and deep politics, so I thought this wouldn't present much new information, and I also thought it would play too much into the whole "every secret organization is the work of the Illuminati. Well, the latter is sort of true, but it is definitely more nuanced than that, and I have come across a couple of interesting things I hadn't read about before.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      19, Infinite Jest, i'm a little under halfway through. i'm enjoying it. i liked the chapter where the kids playing eschaton beat the shit out of eachother

      i agree rabbits are cool as frick

  93. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    where is the poster count

  94. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    This book is the ultimate "beer guy" fantasy book. Its shit, and boring.

  95. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    23
    Business Finance Subject CB1
    I wish I died. This is not the career I want to be in but I've no motivation to change myself.

  96. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Looking at those feet gave me chest pain. o_o
    Brb going to write a poem dedicated to feet. Inbox me if you are a femanon that possesses feet.

  97. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Anyone read Mo Zi or Lieh Tzu?

  98. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    29
    foucault's madness and civilization
    after I learned that foucault made the "ship of fools was a real thing" claim despite no actual evidence, now I feel like the whole book is just philosophy masquerading as social science

  99. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    29
    Dead Weight by Ruth Fenisong
    It's enjoyable, but weird in regards to the amount of characters given perspective. I'd mistaken the protagonist for someone else initially.

  100. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    31
    Tämä matka by Eeva-Liisa Manner
    I hate it, it's modernist poetry so there's nothing aesthetically pleasant about it, I'm only reading it because it's required reading for a course

  101. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >21 (frick bros how am I already this old)
    >Blood Meridian
    Jesus fricking christ this is already in my top 5 books, I am 200 pages in. The judge is just incredible. I want to say he is like a more controlled Ahab? Easiest way I could put it is that Ahab is a middle ground between the judge and Heathcliff. Frick its so good

  102. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    33
    Romance of the Three Kingdoms
    Already familiar with most of the story from other mediums but it's an enjoyable read. Wei Yan did nothing wrong.

  103. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    21
    Pic rel
    I was hoping for some more elaborations on religion and culture and how they shaped the people and vice versa, but until the first intermediary period it's mostly about architecture

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Would you recommend it?

  104. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    > 23
    > Blood Meridian
    > Tbh, while I understand it is revered and I can appreciate the prose style, it doesn't feel that much different than any of the Hobbesian nightmare books they have you read as part of the public school curriculum (ie Lord of the Flies) and The Judge strikes the same chord as a Kurtz from Heart of Darkness or Shrike from Miss Lonelyhearts but it hasn't packed the same punch for me yet. I'm a fan of Sade but at this point I just haven't found anything particularly shocking past the gore and vapid Machismo of aestheticizing the American West.

  105. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >30
    >Norwegian Wood
    One third in. I keep seeing moments from my past on every page and the anguish squeezes my heart tighter and tighter making me feel like shit, but I can't stop reading it.

  106. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >35
    >Rereading Albert Schweitzer's On the Edge of the Primeval Forest

    It's a very inspirational book. It makes me want to be more humble, productive and not taking myself too serious. Albert Schweitzer achieved so much, at 30 he had PhD in theology, philosophy and medicine and had written a monograph on J.S. Bach that was translated in various languages. What he did in Africa without being able to hope for any recompensation is more than remarkable.

    It's also a very entertaining read.

  107. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    37, red rising
    well written fantasy slop. enjoying it

  108. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    you youngsters 20 and below should go watch cartoons or play the nintendo

  109. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >21
    >John Clare: Selected Poems

    What a great soul Clare was, even if the common people whom he sought to immortalize and glorify thought of him as a "soft-in-the-head" outsider, much like Van Gogh. He really captured a dying world that had persisted and prospered for centuries by that point, only to be supplanted by the tuberculosis and prostitute-riddled urban manufacturing slums. Such is human ingenuity and avarice. There was never a more keen observer of nature and its creatures. If only he could witness our own doomed, soulless world to-day.

  110. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    21, Dune, not bad, only read 50 pages in 10 minutes, I can see it trying to sprout some authentic kind of revealing of human nature, that is not really explored but it might get off the track idk.

  111. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    26
    Hunger
    it's great, I like how he's just walking around messing with random people

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      I read that one and a few others last year, was a good time. Hunger isn't even the best imo

  112. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >26
    >Power Broker
    Beautifully written so far and very Illuminating, especially as someone with an interest in the built environment. At times it feels like something by Steinbeck. Caro is great. Picked this up as a primer for LBJ and it has certainly made me more excited so far. One of those stories of how a powerful will can take a little opportunity overlooked in the structure of the System and turn it into something far beyond what was ever expected or intended. It's also a fascinating portrait of a man with such potential eventually being consumed by his own ambition, and the effects his power had on the world.

  113. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    22
    Braudel’s Structures of Everyday Life. An absolute slog but a pleasure in a roundabout way. Braudel is one of those historians who cares more about accuracy than painting a pretty picture so it’s been interesting how he’s been cautious to the level of self-abasement in his analysis. While those constant counter arguments he foists on himself are what make it a slog it’s interesting to have a look into what historical debates would have looked like in the 70s.

  114. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    26
    48 laws of power
    Thought provoking. Reminder of deception and to only put my trust in God.

  115. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >21
    >The Sound and the Fury
    >Excruciatingly boring. Faulkner is not for me. I hardly enjoy most American writers now that I think about it

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Have you enjoyed any American writers?

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Fitzgerald and Hemingway

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          Sounds like you need some Steinbeck in your life before you write off the Americans.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      You’re opinion will change after you’ve grown some hair on your ass

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Probably won't, French literature satisfies me enough

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      tsatf is a masterpiece. couldn’t stop thinking about for weeks after my second read.

  116. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >21
    >Blood Meridian
    150 pages in and the pace is sort of slow for me but i find it entertaining, somehow i see some parallels with like apocalypse now
    im a film guy mostly but these 2 weeks i have time off uni and i decided to finish it

  117. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    26

  118. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    30
    The Map and the Territory
    It's ok, about how vapid modern art is and him breaking into that milieu, his worst book (from what I've read so far.)

    Lot of people in their 20s (and younger) here, I feel like a boomer

  119. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    23
    Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix
    good fun nostalgia read
    frick umbridge

  120. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    69
    Memories of Hadrian
    Very nice, I like the mix history and sensitivity, but it drags on sometimes

  121. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    32
    Blow-up and other stories
    Nothing too compelling yet but that's okay because it's a shrot story anthology

  122. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >35
    >the one i'm writing
    >AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA ... UUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAGADGFJRNTBRJREKWLWLWKEUDYDHHFBCJEOEOWLLALAOQUEY

  123. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Who are the biggest footcel writers?

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      salinger definitely

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Trilby by George du Maurier was the OG in the public consciousnes.

  124. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    21
    Collected writings of Edgar Allan Poe
    Nice bedtime stories but I probably should have taken more time analyzing parts of it.

  125. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    27
    Treasure Island
    I never had the chance to read it before, and i'm really enjoying it, the call of the sea is really strong

  126. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    25
    dubliners
    comfy

  127. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    24
    Heretics of Dune
    I wish I stopped at God Emperor, but I'm too far in that I don't want to just drop it. I will probably skip Chapterhouse though.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Yeah Chapterhouse kinda stinks and ends on a cliffhanger, you're not missing too much.

  128. 1 month ago
    Marty

    25
    White Noise by Don DeLillo
    Finally got the to point where the plot happens and it's not just rambling internal musings. The first part was slow but he is very insightful and DeLillo's prose is masterful.

  129. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    29
    Pensées
    Also Of Human Bondage
    Both are pretty incredible so far

  130. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    29
    The Master and Margarita
    Pretty good, It captures my imagination like nothing I've ever read.

  131. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    34
    This month main read: House of leaves
    This week work break read: The old man and the sea

    HoL was a gift, the person who gave it to me said that I was the only person she knows that could probably read, understands it and enjoy it. It''s a fun read, but since I'm used to deal with proof reading and grading papers it's kinda my jam.

    Old man and the sea is my "go to" for a fun fast read from time to time, lot of teachings IMO.

  132. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    34
    Paradise Lost, Milton
    I got filtered hard on my first attempt. Had to take a step back and get more comfortable reading old English poetry. Enjoying it more now, though I feel like I should have read more from Virgil and Dante first.

    Also The Bible. Been reading it every day on my lunch break for a few years. Thinking of writing a commentary on the first several chapters of Genesis for my son to read when he's older and I'm dead.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Nice one, anon! I got into literature as a kid, in a way to try to mimic my father behavior, unfortunally he lost the battle against his demons, for more than 2 decades turning into a drunken hollow shadow of a man

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Sorry about your dad, anon. The same thing nearly happened to my dad. He had a hard life, but reading the bible got his head out of the fog and motivated me to do the same.

  133. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    22
    An Investigation of the Laws of Thought
    A bunch of it is fraudulent, but I can see how much of Boole's conceptual models eventually became useful in the foundations of computing and the revolution in mathematical logic preceding it.

  134. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    30, Godel Escher Bach: An Eternal Golden Braid.

    Its fun enough, though maybe less so for people who know the concepts it covers. Think the writer's a bit of a schitzo, and dont fully agree with his thesis. But even so, it's been a good introduction to formal systems for me so far.

    Also: in the most recent print, dude self flagelates hard for not including women in his hypotheticals. Its kinda pathetic to bash himself as sexist for something he never intended to demean anyone.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Thats fricking cringe but I have this book but only have read the intro or whatever it was, what is the thesis even?

  135. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >>age
    35
    book
    The Cement Garden
    >>your thoughts on it
    Makes me wish I had a hot sister

  136. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >32
    >neuromancer
    >I like it but I can't hardly understand what the frick half of anything means it's mostly nonsense techno-jargon

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Had the same experience. I read it after playing cyberpunk 2077 so some concepts were kind of clear. Sadly I read a spanish translation that translated even keywords which made some concepts that I should have known fly over my head.
      That's why I'm going to reread it in english and just get the whole series in the original language.

  137. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >25
    >necroepilogos
    >giwtwm also this author needs to release chapters more quickly

  138. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >31
    >Les Misérables
    >I'm enjoying it

  139. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >34
    >The Holy Bible, The Hobbit
    >The word of God and a brilliant start for Tolkien's world which would be fully realize in The LotR

  140. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >12
    >Dork Diaries: Tales From A Not-So-Posh Paris Adventure!
    >true literature, genius

  141. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >27
    >The Secret History
    >I think it could have been better

  142. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    26
    Pride and Prejudice
    pretty good ngl. Not that deep but's it's pretty entertaining. I'm aching to finish it because I've decided I'll finish Dune series as I've only read the first one

  143. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    20, House of Leaves

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      whoops, I meant to add, so far it's Ok, I've only just started it and seems to be
      "ahh, nonconforming geometry"

  144. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    32
    Primal Hunter book 7
    the MC is a bit of an edgelord hypocrite butthole.Will probably read the next book because its the only one left and I like OP MCs and Fantasy anyway

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >autistic office worker becomes edgy ranger in alternate fantasy reality

      he's literally me

  145. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >21
    >Fairy Tale.
    >Liking it so far, only 63 pages in.

  146. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >25
    >Moby Dick
    I enjoy it but god damn I don’t need to know everything about the representation of whales in french art, or the difference between some random types whales, or the FRICKING use of whale bones in indigenous cultures, just tell me what Achab is up to ffs.
    Still reading everything though.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      I'm about 300 pages in and I love the whale autism parts. Enjoy the journey, it will be over before you know it.

  147. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    22
    With Fire and Sword. It starts really slow, but becomes a great read when it picks up. It vaguely reminds me of Hugo's works in style, though it replaces many of the long historical tangents with detailed descriptions of the Ukrainian steppe.

  148. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    22
    Tanya the Evil and The Shadow of the Torturer
    Both are pretty based

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