Are highschool-core books worth revisiting in adulthood?

Are highschool-core books worth revisiting in adulthood?

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  1. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Every book I read as an adult hit me way different than as a kid. I'd say yes. Some you enjoy less, some more.

  2. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Most high school English “teachers” are just functionally literate morons with “education degrees.” Best to revisit any text you read in school.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      This. Most teachers are losers in their personal lives who get off on bossing around children. They’re worse than prison guards.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        >They’re worse than prison guards
        Have you been in prison?

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          Have family that were in prison and others that were prison guards. I respect prison guards more than teachers.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      I dunno about you but my literary studies teacher in 11th grade seemed cool

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      It's a pretty fulfilling job 3 years in. Nuking the Holocaust stuff out of the curriculum I was handed and replacing it with Greek mythology and Chekhov. Getting a bunch of 9th graders to read The Metamorphosis and enjoy it was awesome too.

      I'm actually torn at which I like teaching more, smart kids or poor dumb ones. More likely the smart kids will engage with the text more but you soon realize that they're smart enough to not really need you, whereas if you get a ghetto hoodrat to actually start doing his work and putting effort in you feel like you're making a positive change in the universe

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        >Nuking the Holocaust stuff out of the curriculum I was handed and replacing it with Greek mythology and Chekhov.
        How the frick did you get away with that?

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          He didn’t. He is lying.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >he went to public school

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        My high school was part of the ESA thoughbeit

  3. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Some of them are great books that are just, for some damn reason, associated with high school. "Lord of the Flies" is just a great book, it shouldn't be ghettoized.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Great Gatsby isn't taught right, since it's a technical achievement not a narrative one but "Art is subjective!1!1!!!" so homosexuals don't talk about how it executes a core concept at everylevel and just blurble about color theming before wondering why kids don't want to fricking read anymore. Of Mice and Men is and has always been worthless dreck, one of a million "Dusty butthole" Misery porn novels that has its place purely because of survivorship bias. Catcher is mid, and 1984 being a heavy allegory work isn't bad but makes it very fricking clear what it's trying to say.

      Lord of the Flies is the definition of a faulty thesis work. The writer was just a homosexual who had to rig his own experiment even in a fictional world where he controlled everything. Fricking moronic and it completely undermined his own argument.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Out of curiosity, what are your thoughts on "A Confederacy of Dunces"?

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          While I'd admit to it having been a very long time since I read it, and it wasn't part of any curriculum, I do recall after deciding to see if there was any discussion about it that I wasn't entirely certain how many people got the joke, so to speak.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        >Lord of the Flies is the definition of a faulty thesis work. The writer was just a homosexual who had to rig his own experiment even in a fictional world where he controlled everything. Fricking moronic and it completely undermined his own argument.
        It's a novel, not an essay. I realize you enjoy feeling that you're smarter than the people around you, but calm down for a second.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          Some books are both and Lord of the Flies is 100% both, infamously so. It's the author's commentary on the nature of civilization.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            Your perspective is too academic. You don't need to respond to everything you read by creating a three-part essay trying to decode the symbolism and themes and character development like you're still in middle school.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            For most books I'd say you're 100% right but Lord of the Flies has always worn what it is on it's sleeve and it's not like it's a well written story on its own merits so the examination it loudly and obnoxiously demands is basically all there is to do with it.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            >it's not like it's a well written story on its own merits
            You should go back to it. I remembered it this way (as a novel that beats you over the head with a Hobbesian sort of message) until I reread it as an adult and was surprised to find a subtly crafted story with an outlook that wasn't nearly as gloomy as it seemed when I was filling out worksheets about the book in high school.

  4. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    They're all a lot better if you read them with some actual context.

  5. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >Of Mice and Men
    Dunno, never re-read it, but after reading Grapes of Wrath as an adult, I'd say it's probably worth going back to any Steinbeck.
    >Great Gatsby
    It's a classic for a reason. I've read it probably four times and it gets better every time.
    >Catcher
    I didn't care all that much for it as an adult. Seems to have a special effect at the right age.
    >1984
    No.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >I didn't care all that much for it as an adult. Seems to have a special effect at the right age.
      elaborate

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        When I was 17 or thereabouts, I could identify pretty strongly with Holden, and I thought the book was very insightful. I was probably 25 or so when I re-read it, and it just seemed like the part of my life where Holden's outlook and concerns were recognizably my own was over.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          25 is not old enough to get Catcher.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            Alright. When should I re-read it again? I'm 27 now.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            When I was 17 or thereabouts, I could identify pretty strongly with Holden, and I thought the book was very insightful. I was probably 25 or so when I re-read it, and it just seemed like the part of my life where Holden's outlook and concerns were recognizably my own was over.

            re-reading it at 30 kinda ruined it for me

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Young readers tend to identify with characters (OMG he's literally me) while adults treat novels as the psychological character studies that they are. Catcher is a brilliant character study and points to something of substance, but nothing Holden says is especially salient or poignant. I think a lot of books develop a meme status because they get "first dibs" on developing minds and are never challenged after that.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          The part where he goes on about the museum never changing is insightful to me.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Gatsby
      >It's a classic for a reason. I've read it probably four times and it gets better every time.

  6. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Being forced to read anything in high-school sucks.
    I've enjoyed most of the books you've sent since I graduated, I'm Canadian though so only half carry over to our curriculum.
    I'd give them a second chance if you haven't, they're a lot better when you're not stuck in an angst ridden teen brain.

  7. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    We only read 3 novels in high school (Canada)
    1. Brave New World
    2. Flowers for Algernon
    3. Under the ribs of death

    Is this normal for public schools, or we abnormally deprived of exposure to literature. I remember we had a whole month discussing "A Street Car Named Desire" in English class, but we never did shakespeare, or any poetry.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >Is this normal for public schools, or we abnormally deprived of exposure to literature.
      Not in comparison to where I went to school (rural Oklahoma). I remember we did Animal Farm and some book about the Holocaust that I got yelled at by my dad for reading because my dad was an antisemite. I think we did Romeo and Juliet too. I'm so glad I'm not a kid anymore; going to school sucked.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      did you take the Literature and Film course? I did and we read a university amount of books in that class

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      yeah it’s pretty normal if you’re a poorgay who went to a shitty high school, we only really read the autobiography of malcom x during my junior year kek
      but my freshman year was a little better because we had a respectable teacher who was only mildly libtarded, he quit afterwards though.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      I went to Catholic high school in Ontario and we covered a Shakespeare work each year. R&J, Merchant of Venice, Hamlet, Macbeth

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Western Canada High School? I remember "A Street Car Named Desire" as well, though we covered some of Shakespeare's works. It was English IB, rather than the 'regular' curriculum.

      What I can remember, in chronological order:
      Aeschylus - Agamemnon
      R&J
      Polish female soviet-bloc poet.
      Huxley - Brave New World
      Poems the names of which I cannot remember.
      Book I can't remember.
      Macbeth
      Hamlet
      Short story "The Boat".
      "Wit", play by Margaret Edson
      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wit_(play)
      A Streetcar Named Desire

      Plenty I missed, feels like there's a hole in my memory where eleventh grade should be. Oh well.

  8. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Yes, I am slowly buying and rereading all the mandatory readings.

  9. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Steinbeck and Fitzgerald are good reads in your adult years. Orwell and Salinger not so much.

  10. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I read my name is Malia

  11. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    No. Yes. I don't know. Pick an answer and delete this fricking moronic thread you dumb piece of shit homosexual.

  12. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Yeah because it lets you self reflect on how your own perceptions have changed and matured over time.

  13. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    no. all those books they make you read in high school are dogshit, probably intentional to make people stop reading after high school. I read picrel in 9th grade instead of the gay gatsby

  14. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >Of Mice and Men
    Never read it
    >Great Gatsby
    100% some of the greatest prose in the human language and the story/characters are really good too
    >Catcher in the Rye
    Read it in my early 20s. It's pretty terrible, didn't like the prose, story, Holden is an annoying protagonist, weakest coming of age story I've read that's famous
    >1984
    It's really bad. Which makes sense since it became popular because the CIA wanted anti-Soviet propganda. Crazy a lot of people consider this their favorite book

  15. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    If you are responsible for educating your son then yes

  16. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    He rapes his sister, Phoebe.

  17. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    They were all written with adults in mind

  18. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Here in Binland we read Catcher in the Rye as well as One Flew over Cuckoo's Nest in high school. In addition to that, we read The Unknown Soldier(s) and The Cobblers of Heath because, well Finland.
    But I think there's great value in re-reading HS stuff, as an older person your perspective (hopefully) has grown for you to find new facets from them.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      In middle school i read Sinuhe the Egyptian because i was not a YA pleb
      >only got an 8 on my report

  19. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I'm gonna do the same, except for books I read in elementary school like Holes and The Giver. I think revisiting is worth it if you're an autist who likes to rate everything you read and need to refresh your memory.
    >Of Mice and Men
    Okay I guess, no big flaws.
    >Gatsby
    Seeing people praise it so highly is wild to me. I randomly found it in the trash when I was 27 and only picked it up because I knew it was "famous". An exceptional man ends up doing pretty much nothing with his life because of his oneitus (her only good quality being hot). None of the characters did anything for me. 6/10 overall though it left a major impression on me for being so disappointing, the flashback bit was the best part. I'm apparently supposed to appreciate the prose?
    >1984
    I rate it highly just for making me feel like I was there. The torture scene is the only thing from a novel to ever frick me up. I tried to re-read it a year later and couldn't, as if I'd never seen a horror movie, a shock site, or a gore thread.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >I'm apparently supposed to appreciate the prose?
      Great Gatsby is basically the literary equivalent of an engine that is just really, really, really well designed, or a bit of code that is as effective as is possible at a single, specific function. It's basically a technical accomplishment, the idea being "The author set a narrative goal and theme, shallowness, vapidity, what have you, and then worked that into the narrative and the mechanical construction of its text and format perfectly at every level.".

      From that standpoint it's very, very impressive *as an author* much like very well written code or a phenomenally designed engine are impressive to a software engineer or a mechanical engineer, and worth learning about. But they don't teach that in schools usually, possibly because it gets close to uncovering the lie about literature [and all art] being subjective by talking about how you can identify mechanical or narrative goals and evaluate execution of them, or honest to frick it's possible that academia, having been devolving into shallow, parroted dogma for decades, literally just fricking forgot at some point, and people assumed "it's a classic, ergo it's good and we should learn about it right?".

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        I'll probably never develop the eyes to confirm this structure for myself but the idea of it will stick with me. Thanks for the thoughtful reply, I almost feel unworthy of it.

  20. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    steinbecks novels are fantastic, i've read way way way worse shit like the alchemist

  21. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    in italy they made us read Dante in highschool

  22. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I didn’t go to high school

  23. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I read Catcher in the Rye again recently and still loved it. I also read of Mice and Men for the first time recently a I didn't do that one at school and really liked it.

  24. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    my literature professor in college had a set of 5 books that he would revisit each decade of his life. One of them was the man without qualities by robert musil but i unfortunately forgot the rest.

  25. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >Of Mice and Men
    Fine. A bit too simple but it's okay as baby's first book
    >Great Gatsby
    A good book lauded as the greatest hy dumb fricks who like it for it's briefness. Elegant in it's structure, conveys it's thematics well, characterizes the characters very well. The model of a decent novel, but not much past that
    >Catcher in the Rye
    Appeals to the same audience as Dostoyevsky, as in the eternal teenagers who are resentful of everyone and everything. It's decent but people worship at it's alter feverishly
    >1984
    Just a bad novel. The allegory is simply too heavy handed. There is little to be said about technique or artistry. Any criticism towards it is easily deflected by simply calling the critic a communist. As soon as I hear the word dystopian or orwellian come out of a normy's mouth I want to fricking die. A disaster for the art of literature really

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >Any criticism towards it is easily deflected by simply calling the critic a communist
      Orwell was adamantly socialist though.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >all that text for such normie opinions
      Back to booktok with you

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      baby's first opinion

  26. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    It’s never gonna be the same, but I recently took this on and enjoyed The Giver and The Tracker and Hatchet. I don’t think you’ll be able to get the right sense of adventure or mystery as an adult but it can be enjoyable.

  27. 1 month ago
    Brazil Anon

    I wish I was born in a first world country.

    Nobody reads anything in Brazil, despite literature being mandatory in school. In general, students have to read books by Machado de Assis (99.9% get the summary on the internet)

    In my case, I was a little lucky, I got a scholarship at one of the best schools in the city, and I had a greater emphasis on literature... and I was charged very little. The books were:

    - Machiavelli's Prince (philosophy class)

    - 1984 (sociology class)

    - Classics of the Portuguese language: Dom Casmurro and The Posthumous Memoirs of Brás from Cunas from Machado of Assis (Portuguese lit GOAT), O Cortiço and Barren Lives

    Compared to my colleagues from other schools, it was a good repertoire

    and if you want to read a 100 page classic, read barren lives: https://www.amazon.com.br/Barren-Lives-Vidas-American-English-ebook/dp/B00992AHFI/ref=sr_1_1?qid=1706466050&refinements=p_27%3AGraciliano+Ramos&s=books&sr=1-1

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