Barbarossa - Could it have been successful? If yes, how?

Barbarossa - Could it have been successful? If yes, how?

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  1. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    had they prioritized moscow and leningrad like his generals told him to

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      You're an idiot.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        you're right, die führer never made mistakes, sorry

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          >die führer
          *der
          D
          die is for feminine nouns

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            Ok, die Führerin.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            I don't believe in your made up gender nonsense.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      >he has no understanding of WWII

  2. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >Barbarossa - Could it have been successful?
    Only if Stalin did Brest-Litovsk 2.0

  3. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    if japan invaded, yes

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      How would Japan seizing a fragment of East Asia help defeat Russia in Europe?

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        Because the russians should had needed to sent tropps there so they had less in Europe?

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          Write you English much goodly?

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          Soviets had a significant military contingent in the Far East throughout the entire war.
          A theoretic sea embargo would be a bigger problem.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            They still moved some divisions from the Far East to the frontline prior to the Battle of Moscow because they learnt that Japan wasn't gonna attack.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            https://www.operationbarbarossa.net/the-siberian-divisions-and-the-battle-for-moscow-in-1941-42/

            Only 14 divisions transferred from the Far East to the front against Germany between August (when Sorge’s ring first got set up) and December 1941. And only 4 of them went into army groupings involved in the battle around Moscow. That’s out of 98 divisions that took part organized as such, plus another 4 and a bit of you count all the independent tank brigades.

            The idea that the Siberian troops saved Moscow is a myth.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            Yep, and it was a myth created primarily by the Soviets themselves because every military needs its heroes. Ukraine did the exact same thing during the assault on Kiev by creating a larger-than-life persona to boost morale.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Not this again. Every single time there's always someone who says this stupid shit.
      I'm not even going to bother go into details so I'm going to be as plain as possible

      1. Germany never informed Japan of the invasion
      2. Japan needed oil and rubber. Siberia had no oil or rubber. Japan only had stockpiles for one major offensive
      3. Japan didnt want another endless frontline like China
      4. Navy overruled the Army
      5. By the time Japan prepared its invasion plans of the USSR the weather turned and US/Dutch embargo tighetened

      Sure, Germany could have informed Japan of the plans when its minister visited Berlin in 1941, Japan would have had more time to prepare Kantokuen to co-ordinate with Barbarossa. The sheer Shock&Awe of a double invasion might have been enough to cause a crack in Stalins regime, and the capture of Vladivostok would have been significant since 50% of US aid to the USSR came through that port, but you're still basically asking Japan to suicide its entire empire and nation for the sake of a country that has practically ignored their existence.

  4. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    absolutely
    Germans badly mismanaged the invasion of the Baltics in the first few days of the war. They were too conservative when approaching Riga and allowed the Soviet 8th army to retreat further inland which delayed their advance for nearly a month. they then made more mistakes when they allowed Soviet troops to retreat east and leave Estonia in an orderly fashion by focusing on Tallinn and the Baltic islands. German commanders mistakenly prioritized these areas instead of Leningrad because they thought they could be used to launch bombers to strike berlin, and that this would have eroded public support for the war. Their first assumption was correct, but their second one was not.
    had they planned the operation better, and had more support and ambitious commanders, its possible they would have reached the outskirts of Leningrad as early as July 20th, while soviets were still in Tallinin and the baltic islands. furthermore Leningrad had not been evacuated yet and had nearly 3 million people. faced with a siege and practically no resources to feed 3 million people, local soviet commanders would have declared Leningrad an open city and simply surrendered like Paris did in 1940. tallinin and the baltics would have surrendered immediately after anyway since they drew their supplies from the city. the soviet northern front would have collapsed. total POW count would be close to 1 million, even larger than the Kiev encirclement, and the soviet baltic fleet would have been captured intact.

    This surrender would have caused massive damage to the soviet war effort. it would have caused a crisis within the soviet government. its likely Stalin would have been blamed and arrested. Hitler was not wrong about the "rotten structure", his initial kick just wasn't aimed at the right point

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      >faced with a siege and practically no resources to feed 3 million people, local soviet commanders would have declared Leningrad an open city and simply surrendered like Paris did in 1940
      You really think the Stavka would've been kind enough to do that lmao

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        Stavka? absolutely not.
        The local commanders in charge of leningrad when the war started? yes. It's likely.
        when the city was surrounded later in 1941, Stalin feared the garrison would surrender (even though many civilians had already been evacuated, and preparations had been made, food stockpiled, fortifications built etc) and had new commanders flown in to replace them and make sure this wouldn't happen.

  5. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    I have heard that he could have won if he had invaded some months earlier but he was delayed because he went to help Mussolini in his failed invasion of Greece.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      you shouldnt believe everything you hear

  6. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    No. Not unless some miracle happen like Stalin getting a stroke a decade early.

  7. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    The plan itself was successful. However it wasn’t ambitious enough and their Intel was bad.

  8. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    In retrospect, now that we know how critical fuel and oil turned out to be, and how shortages affected Germany later in the war, they really should have gone harder after the Caspian fields. Just ram hard and fast right into Baku and seize it all. This also would have fricked up the Anglo-Soviet invasion of Iran (which happened in late August of '41).

  9. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >Barbarossa - Could it have been successful? If yes, how?

  10. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Yes, if they pointed it West instead of East.

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