Battle of Karbala

I know I'll get a flurry of anger for asking this, but are any of you inspired by the story of Karbala? Even as a non-Muslim, I am moved to tears when I hear the some of these stories of Ashura narrated. So moving and human... I can see why Ali Shariati characterized Shiism as a religion of resistance against tyranny

> http://www.shariati.com/english/redblack.html

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  1. 5 months ago
    Anonymous

    Well yeah shooting arrows at babies is wrong

  2. 5 months ago
    Anonymous

    get outta here with your taqiyya

  3. 5 months ago
    Anonymous

    I love Hussain ibn Ali ibn Abi Talib

  4. 5 months ago
    Anonymous

    > a thread about Karbala

    Shock value bullshit incoming in 3, 2, ...

    • 5 months ago
      Anonymous

      The frick? How is describing what happened shock value?

      • 5 months ago
        Anonymous

        > How is describing what happened shock value?

        Not describing what happened, but saying extreme things like majoosi, bakri, they cut their backs to the bone with knives, etc. to piss people off itt

  5. 5 months ago
    Anonymous

    Karbala is how iranians tricked people to join their majoosi cult

    • 5 months ago
      Anonymous

      > Karbala is how iranians tricked people to join their majoosi cult

      Anyone look into Jorjani's ideas on this subject? It's actually quite fascinating

      • 5 months ago
        Anonymous

        >Jorjani's
        Cringe

        • 5 months ago
          Anonymous

          > Cringe

          Explain. I won't seethe for your enjoyment, explain

          • 5 months ago
            Anonymous

            Dumbass believes in ancient aliens and other horseshit. He's just another example of moronic diaspora

          • 5 months ago
            Anonymous

            Which thinkers have it right, in your estimation?

            Imagine killing your prophet's grandson. Imagine Paul raping and killing Mary while claiming to be the successor of Jesus

            Were members of Hussein's family raped during captivity?

          • 5 months ago
            Anonymous

            >can't understand analogy

          • 5 months ago
            Anonymous

            I just don't know if that actually happened, I'm not fully familiar with the narrative.

  6. 5 months ago
    Anonymous

    Imagine killing your prophet's grandson. Imagine Paul raping and killing Mary while claiming to be the successor of Jesus

    • 5 months ago
      Anonymous

      >Imagine Paul raping and killing Mary while claiming to be the successor of Jesus
      catholic spotted

      • 5 months ago
        Anonymous

        Nah, that's some smallhat shit

        • 5 months ago
          Anonymous

          >smallhat
          ?

          • 5 months ago
            Anonymous

            I do wonder...

          • 5 months ago
            Anonymous

            I do wonder...

            what's a small hat

          • 5 months ago
            Anonymous

            A yarmulke, it's a israeli thing. /misc/ calls them smallhats sometimes

          • 5 months ago
            Anonymous

            oh I get it now

  7. 5 months ago
    Anonymous

    >inspired
    Nah. Makes me miffed that the usurpers Muawiya and Yazid won those conflicts though. No one likes Yazid.

    • 5 months ago
      Anonymous

      >No one likes Yazid.

      Who should have won?

  8. 5 months ago
    Anonymous

    It's fits better as a sacrificial moment in a religion than any other moment I know of

  9. 5 months ago
    Anonymous

    The secret societies that emerged decades after karbala had more interesting history

    • 5 months ago
      Anonymous

      Are you referring to the ones which arose in Iran, or others?

      • 5 months ago
        Anonymous

        They emerged in the syrian coast, southern iraq, eastern arabia, and iran

        • 5 months ago
          Anonymous

          You mean the Ismailis/assassins? Were there other important ones?

          • 5 months ago
            Anonymous

            No those came later. The major one were the kaysanites who went underground in Iran after Mukhtar's death and started a movement that would end up becoming the Abbasid revolution. The other shia claimants also had their own groups.

          • 5 months ago
            Anonymous

            Ah I see, Jorjani somewhat touches on this in

            > Karbala is how iranians tricked people to join their majoosi cult

            Anyone look into Jorjani's ideas on this subject? It's actually quite fascinating

            and claims much of it was influenced by the Mazdakists who were already being persecuted by the Sasanians before the Arabs came.

            So was the story of the Abbasids basically:
            > Umayyads are too Arab-centric and extravagant, people get pissed
            > Bani Abbas caters to the Shia by saying they'll get Ahl al-Bayt back in the driver's seat
            > Abu Muslim and the other guy who made Kufa rebel break away from the Umayyads then pledge their fealty to the first Abbasid caliph
            > the first Abbasid caliph takes power, does away with these two figures, increases the efficiency of their government and adopts a more Iranian style of rule
            > Although Arab-centrism is no longer an issue, Abbasids become worse than the Umayyads in persecuting their detractors (especially the Shia) and try to make up for it by focusing on cultural and scientific development (the Golden Age)
            > As the influence of the caliphate weakens until it's limited to Baghdad , the Iranian Buyids take power and keep them on the throne as figureheads
            > The Turks take over when they wreck the Buyids, then everything goes to hell when the Mongols arrive

          • 5 months ago
            Anonymous

            No the Abbasids entered the stage later. Kaysanities -> kaysanties split -> Hashemites -> Abbasids
            >persecuting their detractors (especially the Shia)
            The Abbasid government was actually dominated by them.

          • 5 months ago
            Anonymous

            No the Abbasids entered the stage later. Kaysanities -> kaysanties split -> Hashemites -> Abbasids
            >persecuting their detractors (especially the Shia)
            The Abbasid government was actually dominated by them.

            Also the Abbasids claimed the imamate. They only dropped that idea during the reign of Al Mahdi.

          • 5 months ago
            Anonymous

            What's the difference between imamate and caliphate?

          • 5 months ago
            Anonymous

            >imamate and caliphate?
            sole religious authority whereas the caliphate gradually lost it's religious authority to the ulama

          • 5 months ago
            Anonymous

            imams are from the Ahl al-Bayt and infallible, caliphs are elected and fallible

          • 5 months ago
            Anonymous

            No the Abbasids entered the stage later. Kaysanities -> kaysanties split -> Hashemites -> Abbasids
            >persecuting their detractors (especially the Shia)
            The Abbasid government was actually dominated by them.

            Oh, I see a bit better now. It can be very difficult to follow all this lol.

  10. 5 months ago
    Anonymous

    Reading anything post-Muhammad about the Khalifah is kind of bizarre.
    >Aisha totally didn't hate Ali, they were friends, it was some israelite that we scapegoat that was behind all this!
    >The arbitration of Ali
    >The khawarij
    >Mohammad's biggest enemies that only converted at the last minute inheriting the caliphate
    And look at the fricking apologetics if you try to think critically about the post-Mohammad behavior of his companions

    Al-Qurtubi said:

    It is not permissible to attribute any deliberate mistake to any of the Sahaabah, because they based all their actions on what they believed was right and proper, and their intention was to Allah, may He be glorified and exalted. They are all examples for us to follow and Allah has instructed us to refrain from discussing the disagreements that arose among them, and we should only mention them in the best way, because of the sanctity of their being Companions of the Prophet (blessings and peace of Allah be upon him), and because the Prophet (blessings and peace of Allah be upon him) forbade reviling them; moreover, Allah has forgiven them and told us that He is pleased with them. End quote. "Tafseer al-Qurtubi, 16/321 "

    Ibn Abi Zayd al-Qayrawaani said, when discussing what the Muslim is obliged to believe about the Companions of the Messenger of Allah (blessings and peace of Allah be upon him) and what should be said about them: No one of the Companions of the Messenger (blessings and peace of Allah be upon him) should be mentioned except in the best of terms, and we should refrain from discussing the disputes that arose among them. They are the most deserving of people to have their words and actions interpreted in the best manner and to be thought of in the best terms. End quote.

    ‘Aqeedat Ahl as-Sunnah wa’l-Jamaa‘ah fi’s-Sahaabah al-Kiraam, 2/734
    No critical thinking allowed

    • 5 months ago
      Anonymous

      What no separation between church and state does to a mf

    • 5 months ago
      Anonymous

      If there's one thing shias are correct about over the sunnis it is their view of history

    • 5 months ago
      Anonymous

      Sunni Islam is an abbasid invention. It's purpose was to placate and merge all factions. It suceeded for the most part and only failed to absorb the shia and a few khawarij sects. This is why you get shit like this

      • 5 months ago
        Anonymous

        So... the khawarij were about to side with Ali, but then they become the forerunners for ISIS?

        • 5 months ago
          Anonymous

          >So... the khawarij were about to side with Ali, but then they become the forerunners for ISIS?
          no they were giga morons. They demanded arbitration and stopped fighting the Syrians so Ali would be forced to arbitrate with Muawiyah. When it happened they turned around and said but God's caliph can't negotiate with rebels and rebelled against Ali and labelled him an apostate. Then they went back to Iraq and started raping and pillaging and being a general nuisance. Ali followed them and smashed them. Then they planned to assassinate him by attacking while he was in the middle of prayer. It's funny because they claimed to be the most pious but they were the ones to attack a guy who was prostrating to god while in prayer

          • 5 months ago
            Anonymous

            Don't forget that the assassin only did it because he was horny and a woman promised to marry him if he did it

          • 5 months ago
            Anonymous

            I didn't know that part

          • 5 months ago
            Anonymous

            >Among them was a woman named Qatami, who impressed Ibn Muljam with her beauty. She agreed to his proposal of marriage with a wedding gift that included the murder of Ali. She then arranged for her tribesman, Wardan, to assist Ibn Muljam in his mission

      • 5 months ago
        Anonymous

        That's...an amazing theory actually.
        Sunnism is indeed way more fractured than they show it to be. Did you know that up until 1924 every madhab would pray behind their own designated place in Kaba?

        • 5 months ago
          Anonymous

          >That's...an amazing theory
          It's not a theory that's literally what happened

    • 5 months ago
      Anonymous

      Did early Christians feel the same way about the Apostles? I thought even Peter made Jesus mad at some point

  11. 5 months ago
    Anonymous

    The mesopotamian gollowers of Ali, Hasan, and Husayn were so trashy. Their behaviour during the rest of umayyad caliphate was pathetic as well with the most half assed rebellions ever

  12. 5 months ago
    Anonymous

    Bar Aisha lanat

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