British India History

Hello lit, as some of you guys may know many of us here are actually unenlightened about India's true history especially during the British colonialism in Indian Subcontinent. One of the many reasons is I want to know if Pajeets were really such a big shot as they constantly claim online. And I chose British Period because it was the only time where the pajeet history was deeply recorded and discovered. We really don't know much of Indian history before Islamic Conquest. Now i didn't ask this question anywhere else because it would have definitely attracted the whole Pajeet club and they could have misled me with their nonsensical, rubbish and unjustifiably glorified version of historical sense. As some of you people may know Pajeets often resort to this practice to get recognition from foreigners which is backed by their deep inferiority complex. So I urge you guys to recommend me books or other literary writings which are raw, factual, honest and justifiably critical about the Pajeet culture, people and other social activities in that period of time. Picrel is an example written by James Mill. The name of the book is The History of British India. This three volume historical work is really critical about pajeet behaviour and culture of that time period. Mill's work was really influential during that time and it effected the administration of the subcontinent to a great degree.

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  1. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    History of Afghanistan and Baluchistan by Henry Raverty, if you can find it.

    I read the Anarchy by Dalrymplw and it was OK. Fair amount of Brit Bashing.

    Churchill's History of English Speaking Peoples has a good section on India. Third volume if I remember right.

    Avoid the ones written by the Indians. You might as well read fiction.

    • 4 weeks ago
      OP

      Thanks anon for your recommendations. I am much more interested in history of Heartland of the Indian subcontinent like north and south India during British period. I wonder why there seems to be a scarcity of such works considering the fact that British ruled that place for such a long time. The british authors must have recorded their true experience.

  2. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Have you heard of the thuggee elimination?

    James L Sleeman - Thuggee: A million man murders
    Edward Thornton - Illustrations of the history and practices of the Thugs, and notices of some of the proceedings of the government of India, for the suppression of the crime of thuggee

    You get a different insight into practical life in india told from its darkest perspective.

    • 4 weeks ago
      OP

      Can you give me a summary of the first book with a few lines? The title seems interesting. And what is the time period the book talks about?

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        I've not read the first yet, I'm still working through Thornton's.
        It's over the 1700 and 1800s what I meant more that it paints a very graphic image of the roving bands of divinely driven highway robbers, a few of their customs and beliefs, but it also lets you see some of the real world lifestyles of earlier india.

  3. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Haven't read this one myself but I'm led to understand that it's about how we only know most Indian history because the British saved it.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      This seems like another glorified and fantacised pro-jeet version of Indian history which OP is talking about

  4. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    You should unironically read the first Flashman book. Despite what people may think its still pretty factual in its history granted only the second half of the book is about his campaign in India and Afghanistan. Its also one of the most funniest books you will ever read.

  5. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Will Durant's A Case for India is a rare sympathetic look that takes India's side. He's the writer of the 11 volume tomes of The Story of Civilization if that helps.

  6. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >Pajeet
    >Inferiority complex
    >British India
    >True history
    >Enlightened
    >Historical

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Good morning saar.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        It's night where I am so I disagree

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          Vary dangerous saar. I knew that it ij night in India saar. Thank you phor conphirming saar.

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Shubhratri fellow anon, or suprabhat

  7. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    The most honest Indian origin Historian in my eyes is R.C. Majumdar - he argued with the Government's Editorial Committee post Indian independence regarding their misrepresentation of Indian History and subsequently quit.

    He has a single volume text called "An Advanced History of India" which covers Ancient, Medieval and pre-Independent India which I always suggest people to read.

    In the latter part of his life, he was also general editor of an 11 volume series using primary sources to gather the history of India but that may be overkill for your purposes.

    Avoid Nehru's Discovery of India.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Why are we doing away with Nehru? I was under the presumption that he was kind of chad for his time

  8. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    /pol/-tier thread even if it's about books

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >WAAAHH! /misc/ WAAAHH
      R*dditBlack person response.

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