Chameleon pill

How stable is OpenSuse for home use? I know that a rolling distro is bound to have some instability, but I've heard a lot of good endorsements of this OS and how stable it is for one. Is it worth giving a try?

Beware Cat Shirt $21.68

Rise, Grind, Banana Find Shirt $21.68

Beware Cat Shirt $21.68

  1. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    It's not worth a try

  2. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    tumbleweed mostly just werks for me, been on it for a year and a half
    i've had a few programs break and remain somewhat broken, for example there's a python dependency missing for syncplay to work with it's gui, I've experienced packman remain unsynced for a few days leading to waiting for updates or replacing stuff with opensuse repos, and sometimes stuff getting deprecated from packman leading to choosing what to do at update time
    i had a single showstopper update, when my proprietary old novidya drivers weren't updated for a kernel update for a few days, leading to no X and no desktop unless i booted with the previous kernel, took me two reboots and a few minutes of searching to figure out what had happened
    it's somewhat worth it for a nice ootb kde experience, anything else pretty much all distros are quite stable nowadays, and there's flatpak and appimages for plenty of packages needs
    ideologically they are as afflicted by wokeism as everyone else, at the end of the day it's a corporate distro

    if by home use you mean email+web browser+libreoffice it should just werk as long as you run zypper dup in the terminal once in a while, personally i do it once per week, or at least once a month

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      I'm interested in it right because it seems to be the only big distribution that has KDE Plasma as it's main priority / default desktop option, and it seems to have a somewhat stable rolling release (Tumbleweed). By home use I mostly plan to spend my time in the web browser (gsuite and everything else), but also on the side to do some gaming on steam, and light text/photo editing, torrenting, media playing etc. Does it have the same issue that fedora has with requiring workarounds to get codecs working for playing videos in browsers and stuff? I don't really care about any wokestuff outside of the system, I don't think a community/corp without that shit exists nowadays, I just I don't want to see any activism shit in the OS itself kek, so I'm okay with even Fedora or anyone else.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >Does it have the same issue that fedora has with requiring workarounds to get codecs working for playing videos in browsers and stuff?
        yes, you have to add the packman repo and run a few commands, though nowadays i believe there's no need to do it for pretty much all common proprietary codecs (mp3/h264)

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          >requiring workarounds
          >clicking yes once or twice
          >workarounds

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        The main issue with OpenSUSE is the lack of codecs yes, and the Packman reposity that fixes it. Quite often the repos are out of sync and packages move from one to the other. It can be quite confusing, especially as repo stickiness is enabled by default so it will throw more errors than it otherwise would. Every long time OpenSUSE user knows what to do... basically you just wait a day or two for the repos to sync and allow vendor change so you can see which packages want to move to another repo.

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          >Packman reposity that fixes it
          Flatpak is better for that.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            You know I never tried it, but I doubt it would fix lower level stuff like thumbnail generation or ffmpeg

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >Does it have the same issue that fedora has with requiring workarounds to get codecs working for playing videos in browsers and stuff?
        Nothing more than
        >sudo zypper in opi
        >opi codecs
        And you're good to go

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          >Does it have the same issue that fedora has with requiring workarounds to get codecs working for playing videos in browsers and stuff?
          yes, you have to add the packman repo and run a few commands, though nowadays i believe there's no need to do it for pretty much all common proprietary codecs (mp3/h264)

          I'm interested in it right because it seems to be the only big distribution that has KDE Plasma as it's main priority / default desktop option, and it seems to have a somewhat stable rolling release (Tumbleweed). By home use I mostly plan to spend my time in the web browser (gsuite and everything else), but also on the side to do some gaming on steam, and light text/photo editing, torrenting, media playing etc. Does it have the same issue that fedora has with requiring workarounds to get codecs working for playing videos in browsers and stuff? I don't really care about any wokestuff outside of the system, I don't think a community/corp without that shit exists nowadays, I just I don't want to see any activism shit in the OS itself kek, so I'm okay with even Fedora or anyone else.

          outdated informatiom
          opensuse comes with h.264 codecs in an official repo

          https://news.opensuse.org/2023/01/24/opensuse-simplifies-codec-install/

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Oh, this is based! Hopefully I won't need packman anymore.

  3. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Just download a VM and see if like, or install to VM then see if like. It's tragic most new users don't think of that vs. all the antiquated dual-booting off one hdd BS which is far more work and breakage-prone.

    You can download free prebuilt VM and even boot from a selection of them locally or on external storage. The best way to compare distros is to do it yourself which avoids fangirls.

  4. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Tumbleweed is my home, it just works and I do some actual work with it and I have a Nvidia card. Never had any issues, aside from packman going out of sync sometimes, but it's mostly an annoiance rather than a destructive problem I had with other distros. Plus, snapper and btrfs snapshots are very handy. If an update is unstable you can rollback in a second and you can try whole DEs with a rollback if you change your mind

  5. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    It has the coolest logo of all the Linux distros. So I would encourage you to try it. I haven't tried it, though. Always wanted to try it since 25 years ago when it wasn't called "open" yet, but still haven't gotten around to it.
    Let me know how you fare with it. I might give it a try as well at some point in the future maybe if results come back positive. It's on my bucket list to get acquainted with that cool gecko one day.

  6. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Been using it as a daily driver for 2ish years, no complaints so far. It unironically cured my distrohopping.

  7. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    It's worse than any of the other main choices (arch, fedora, Ubuntu) but still better than some random distro maintained by literally who

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >It's worse than any of the other main choices

      How? I like that it's a rolling release distro with automated QA. I don't see how it's worse than anything, it's just different.

  8. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I've been running it for a year now and I have nothing to complain about EXCEPT that it's different in the wrong places. I really see no reason for zypper for example.
    I also love how well KDE works on openSUSE.

  9. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Generally speaking, a stable distro is one that doesn't change often whereas an unstable distro is one that changes often.

    Using the word stable only for whether the distro "just works" without a ton of bugs is a whole different thing. That kind of stability often depends not only on frequency of software updates but the user's behavior and the hardware. So there is no stock answer to whether any rolling distro is "stable" in the sense of "just works".

    A user who wants a really stable distro uses a major release distro and follows its conservative update cycle.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >A user who wants a really stable distro uses a major release distro and follows its conservative update cycle.
      I do this currently with Debian. Considering going from stable to testing to try it out. My only concern with the stable approach is security, i.e. if the freezing packages and only changing code to fix established CVEs strategy is less secure in general than a constantly updating distro like Arch. Which one would you consider to be the best in terms of security?

  10. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    piece of fricking trash don't waste your time

  11. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    My experience was far from positive. If you actually need video cards to work, get Ubuntu-based.

    I opted for Mint LXDE. It's pretty light, but works with videocards, neat right?

  12. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    It's actually really cool. Main advantages
    >snapper with automatic snapshots and grub integration
    >Yast to not ever having to touch a terminal or config file if you dont want to
    >excellent installer where you can fine tune everything, from package selection to fstab parameters
    >smug lizard logo
    >doesn't default to gnome
    >completely independent & like 25 years old, the only others that can say that are Fedora (if you include Red Hat), Debian, and Slackware

  13. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Is Tumbleweed more stable than Arch? I had been using Arch for most of last year but had to move to Debian since a system update changed the c++ compiler's ABI and broke the drivers for my smart card reader (which I need for my digital signature).

    Would Tumbleweed have avoided this? Or is rolling release in general just a meme?

    I like Debian a lot, it just works. But I always wanted to try SUSE. Tumbleweed or not.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      It's generally regarded as more stable than arch, and for me it just werks
      So yeah

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        I'll try it in a vm. Debian is good but some packages are way too old. Even on the latest Debian 12 (some packages are from late 2021).

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      You still go through those problems. Rolling is just problems you face over time and you have to deal with new problems as they happen, with the advantage of newer features quicker. Point release is just those problems but all at once.

  14. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    not worth it
    patent laws dog

  15. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    just works if you know your way around

  16. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Running openSUSE Leap 15.2 on an Intel i5 and 15.5 on an AMD 5700G. Ease of mind without problems, much fun.

  17. 3 weeks ago
    Sage

    Slowest distro I've ever had the displeasure of using.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      What is slow?

  18. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I've been using Tumbleweed for 5+ years now and it has only gotten better. Best KDE experience ootb by far. And the install process to get a (non-nvidia) desktop up and running now amounts to running these simple commands:
    sudo zypper in opi
    opi codecs
    Overall I'd recommend it to anyone who knows their way around Linux. Maybe not new users. If you rely on stuff like ROCm and CUDA, be prepared to tinker a bit.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >If you rely on stuff like ROCm and CUDA, be prepared to tinker a bit.
      and opencl? I depend on opencl for a lot of stuff (mostly porn)

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >and opencl?
        At least for AMD, opencl is part of the ROCm stack. You used to be able to install the SLES 15.4 ROCm stuff on TW, but things have diverged too much at this point so it's started breaking. You can definitely just get Ubuntu going under distrobox to generate your AI porn. ROCm should work fine in there.
        https://forums.opensuse.org/t/rocm-hip-cookbook-for-any-distro-tested-with-blender-and-stable-diffusion-on-tumbleweed-with-amd-radeon-7600/170917

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Also I'd day, security policy should be set to "easy" in the installer to have fewer password prompts. OpenSUSE is configured for enterprise settings but default.

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *