chronology of the Muslim conquests of Arabia

I've always found it weird that this event is never mentioned all too often, like from what I understand
>Muhammad and his followers in 622, facing hostility, flee from Mecca to surrounding areas, specifically the city of Medina .
>After establishing themselves, they begin a protracted counter-war, chipping away at the Qurashi trading routes, and finally conquering the city. At 630,
>Muhammad dies in 632, the early Muslim expansion begins at 634
at what point does the rest of the Arabian peninsula get conquered/absorbed into the caliphate and why was it so easy to bring them into the fold then the Quraysh?

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  1. 1 week ago
    Anonymous

    no one really knows, there really wasn't much to conquer except for the few oasis cities. Maps like this are about as detailed you can get for politics there. Did caliphs in Damascus and Baghdad really hold the entire Arabian peninsula? Iirc the rationale for maps showing they do is to stop doing that around the time a bunch of madmen sacked and looted Mecca but it hadn't been the case for a long time probably. The important thing is Muhammad and his successors got a bunch of tribes together under his banner and they mostly moved off the peninsula forever to become a ruler elite.

    • 1 week ago
      Anonymous

      If not the peninsula, they did gain control of Yemen before the conquests.

    • 1 week ago
      Anonymous

      If not the peninsula, they did gain control of Yemen before the conquests.

      There's a theory that Islam started out as a non-trinitarian sect of Christianity and that most early Muslim forces and converts would have been crypto-nontrinitarianists (for lack of a better term)

      • 1 week ago
        Anonymous

        Idiotic

      • 1 week ago
        Anonymous

        Islam is more like the Judaism that Himyar followed than some weird Christian sect

        • 1 week ago
          Anonymous

          islam respects jesus as a important prophet, judaism woudn't do that.

          • 1 week ago
            Anonymous

            and that's why Islam might have started out as a Christian sect. In the Quran the separating between Muhammad's followers and Christians is the acceptance of the Trinity.

          • 1 week ago
            Anonymous

            and that's why Islam might have started out as a Christian sect. In the Quran the separating between Muhammad's followers and Christians is the acceptance of the Trinity.

            So? This doesn’t change shit

  2. 1 week ago
    Anonymous

    Nevermind Arabia, according to this map Cyprus and the entirety of Byzantine Balkans are in rebellion

  3. 1 week ago
    Anonymous

    no reliable sources regarding any of this shit, it might just as well be all made up

    • 1 week ago
      Anonymous

      >no reliable sources regarding any of this shit, it might just as well be all made up

      • 1 week ago
        Anonymous

        yep

  4. 1 week ago
    Anonymous

    >at what point does the rest of the Arabian peninsula get conquered/absorbed into the caliphate and why was it so easy to bring them into the fold then the Quraysh?
    We don't really know. The narrative of the Ridda wars is likely a retcon by later Muslim authors. At the time of Muhammad's death the Muslim coalition likely was confined to western Arabia. When they had success in conquering Byzantine territory in the Levant the Muslim coalition probably snowballed and they turned east to join in on the Arab attacks on Iraq (which had already been going on for some time). It was probably a bandwagon effect over the 630s and 640s of Muslim armies getting more and more loot and other Arabs of the peninsula joining in to get a share.

    • 1 week ago
      Anonymous

      any idea about the status of Yemen?

  5. 1 week ago
    Anonymous

    I really wish there could be a more objective look at early Islam

    • 1 week ago
      Anonymous

      Objective in what way? Archeological evidence?

      • 1 week ago
        Anonymous

        you have muslims who get upset if you ever question even a word of their current narrative and atheist with a specific anti-Islam biases making it seem like Muhammad was a machiavellian strategist

    • 1 week ago
      Anonymous

      The lack of sources really is quite depressing, and even worse, the few non-Quranic sources we do have completely contradict the usual tale. We'll probably never find out.

      • 1 week ago
        Anonymous

        You can use historical analytical techniques to find some objectivity. For example, if you find critical stories about Sunni holy figures in Sunni texts, it's very likely true because they wouldn't fabricate such things, if anything they'd downplay them. Mainly these stories serve to confirm the Shia narrative because these are two diametrically opposed camps, so if they agree on something negative about Sunnis then it is likely to be a historical fact. And there are a lot of stories, like Umar threatening to burn the Prophet's daughter's house, Ali withholding his allegiance from the caliphate, etc.

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