Code: The Hidden Language of Computer Hardware and Software

Just got this book from the library, what am I in for? what do I read next?

Shopping Cart Returner Shirt $21.68

Tip Your Landlord Shirt $21.68

Shopping Cart Returner Shirt $21.68

  1. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Currently reading it, Next one will be k&r, and then after that I'll start with sicp meme.

  2. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    OP here, give me a summary

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      you're not OP, I am. I can give you gist table of contents tho
      >codes and combinations
      >braille and binary codes
      >anatomy of a flashlight
      >communicating around corners
      >logic with switches
      >telegraphs and relays
      >relays and gates
      >our ten digits
      >alternatives 10s
      >bit by bit by bit
      >bytes and hexadecimal
      >from ASCII to Unicode
      >adding with logic gates
      >substraction
      >feedback and flipflops
      >lets build a clock
      >assemblage of memory
      >automating arithmetic
      >arithmetic logic unit
      >registers and busses
      >CPU control signals
      >loops, jumps, and calls
      >peripherals
      >operating system
      >coding
      >world brain
      and that's it, whole book is about 461 pages. This feels basic but they seem to go really really in depth beyond whatever the average v tourist would know

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        Ok so this teaches you some basic shit about boolean and binary, encoding, transistors, relays, logic gates, etc. Sounds like a meme t b h, like first semester freshman shit, another one of those NYT bestseller toilet paper rolls. Anyhow, if you're a IQfy tourist and want to understand how "code" works just play nandgame till the end. It's much more fun. Want more? Download or buy a textbook about various CS theory specializations, like programming language theory (PLT), or learn a language.

        I took your list and removed the parts that nandgame won't touch on. Play nandgame and you'll go through the following:
        >codes and combinations
        >braille and binary codes
        >logic with switches
        >telegraphs and relays
        >relays and gates
        >our ten digits
        >alternatives 10s
        >bit by bit by bit
        >bytes and hexadecimal
        >adding with logic gates
        >substraction
        >feedback and flipflops
        >lets build a clock
        >assemblage of memory
        >automating arithmetic
        >arithmetic logic unit
        >registers and busses
        >CPU control signals
        >loops, jumps, and calls
        >peripherals
        >coding

        This is missing:
        >anatomy of a flashlight (idk, sounds stupid, maybe it's about using a flashlight to communicate something)
        >communicating around corners (dunno what this is about)
        >from ASCII to Unicode (just google this)
        >operating system (huge, huge subject, you can't teach it in just a few pages)
        >world brain (not sure wtf this is, maybe the internet?)

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          >nandgame
          https://nandgame.com/about
          seems like the nandgame recommends this very book
          >If you are interested in the fundamentals of computing, the book Code by Charles Petzold is also highly recommended.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            I know that, this is one of the reasons why I called it a meme. It's recommended often but you don't need it. OTOH it also recommends
            http://nand2tetris.org/
            which is good

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        Sounds like r*ddit to me, read Baker's CMOS and you'll come out with a lot more knowledge about computars

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          >Baker's CMOS
          this is actually neat, thank you anon. Will read it

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            There's also the Etienne Sicard CMOS books that tell you straight up how to layout shit and you can fool around in microwind which is free

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            >Etienne Sicard CMOS
            thank you anon, anymore book recommendations? you seem pretty knowledgeable?

  3. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    goated book, I haven't read the second edition but I saw it adds a chapter where they show how QR codes work which is cool.
    It pairs well with pic related if you wanna get hands-on with what youre learning, the projects do take a while though.
    A good textbook to read afterwards would be CS:APP

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      this one is great but it's more hands-on than Code. You're supposed to code along with this one.

  4. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    It's quite interesting, basically the fundamentals and history of how computers work at their most basic level

  5. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    just read sedra's microelectronic circuits or boylestad

  6. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    based paper chad
    don't forget to leave notes in the blank areas for the next reader

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      >don't forget to leave notes in the blank areas for the next reader
      have you ever found notes in tech books before? I have yet to see anything, have found people leaving behind the occassional sticky note about grocery list inside but no reader notes 🙁

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        mesh and nodal analyzes made with a light pen and tried to be erased in a circuit theories book

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        I found an old copy of SICP at a used book store with handwritten notes in it. They wanted $70 for it though

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *