>completely empty continent filled with tasty dumbass giant sloths etc and edible fruit falling from every other tree

>completely empty continent filled with tasty dumbass giant sloths etc and edible fruit falling from every other tree
>balmy climate unaffected by climate determinism
>culture isn't natively seaborne, has no means of open ocean navigation or outrigger tech
>"yeah lets get hundreds of people into canoes and paddle out into the ocean"
You don't really believe this happened, do you?

Beware Cat Shirt $21.68

Rise, Grind, Banana Find Shirt $21.68

Beware Cat Shirt $21.68

  1. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    I heard that they are actually aincient Albanian-Illyrians.

  2. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    No big surprise…the natives of Brazil could muster fleets of thousands of canoes according to Jesuite accounts… read Pierre Clastres…

    Colombus and others described very big canoes…… as long as galleys and richly decorated…. He managed to sail one of those pirogues from Jamaica to Cuba…

    • 4 months ago
      Anonymous

      Also some other early Euro accounts describe the natives of Florida paddling their canoes to Cuba regularly… and a lot of inter island Caribbean native paddling to other islands….

      • 4 months ago
        Anonymous

        source.

        • 4 months ago
          Anonymous

          Use google books or use the IQfy archives… I posted some screens in several threads about this topic… now I’m from my phone… try using google books in addition to normal google search…. When I get back home I’ll look for them again and if I don’t find them I’ll look in my old PC where I have saved them….

        • 4 months ago
          Anonymous

          For the first claim I’ve already posted a source btw… Pierre Clastres… obviously his magnum opus Societies against the State

        • 4 months ago
          Anonymous

          For the Florida claim

          Indigenous Passages to Cuba, 1515-1900

          You can find the whole Book on Google Books… and look for the passage yourself with the search option… search for James Convington… he’s the guy who wrote one the accounts about it…

    • 4 months ago
      Anonymous

      Also some other early Euro accounts describe the natives of Florida paddling their canoes to Cuba regularly… and a lot of inter island Caribbean native paddling to other islands….

      This reads like cope... natives probably did a lot with a little... no need to embellish...

      • 4 months ago
        Anonymous

        I’ve poster the sources… you have replied “cope”… I don’t think this needd to go further… I’ll probably post more later… but so far this thread was me posting evidence and lazy posters replying with one word responses…

        • 4 months ago
          Anonymous

          Again, why did they do this? Whaling or what? OP pic is talking about 5000ish years ago. If they had these they'd be the most advanced in the world at the time, having developed it from scratch. They'd be 1000s of years ahead of anyone else.

          • 4 months ago
            Anonymous

            >Again, why did they do this?
            Expansionism. Just cause you're content living in your basement and can't see otherwise doesn't mean past humanity refused to explore and conquer new foreign lands.

          • 4 months ago
            Anonymous

            Okay. Now actually think about the question and respond again.

          • 4 months ago
            Anonymous

            Euros did because Europe got overpopulated and increasingly violent. Not to mention plague, cold winters, and the collective memory of several Asian/Arab invasions that meant Europe was never truly safe.

          • 4 months ago
            Anonymous

            > If they had these they'd be the most advanced in the world at the time, having developed it from scratch. They'd be 1000s of years ahead of anyone else.

            Huh not really... there is much older evidence for the colonization of islands in the Pacific... apparently even homosexual erectus managed to do that in some cases in Indonesia

            Even in the Mediterranean there is plenty of evidnce for large sea crossing to and coloization of islands far off the shore such as Cyprus, Malta or Lampedusa... to name a few... and in the case of the Mediterranean they also brought large animals with them like cows and deer... The Neolithic people even reached as far as the Sheetland archipelago... and they set up exchange networks for precious materials... like obsidian from the Mediterranean islands making it to the Mainland and to other islands in large quantities... or vice versa Anatolian obsidian to Cyprus... alpine jade axe making it as far as Malta or the Atlantic... Sicilian amber making to Iberia....

            So no... what happened in the Caribbean isn't exceptional at all... as for the reason of the settlement of the Caribbeans... I don't know the reason, probably some prehistoric fishermen reached some of the islands by chance and slowly began to colonize them since they were empty and they didn't have to compete with other tribes for them... I imagine they were also far less dangerous than the jungles in continental South America...

      • 4 months ago
        Anonymous

        >European conquerors write down.thing negative about natives
        heh..well yeah. they wuz smarter and shiet why would they lie about primitives?
        >European conquerors write something that puts natives in a positive light
        erm....this is le fake because....it just is

  3. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    Representation of a Kalinago kanawa, Lesser Antilles, 1667

    The native pirogues seem to have some added parts, such as those long gunwales, probably attached by sewing, like in many early boats

    • 4 months ago
      Anonymous

      "At the beginning of the 17th century, the Kali’na, named Galibi by the first European travellers, were family groups of farmers, hunters and fishermen, renowned for their imposing maritime fleets composed of large dugout canoes adapted to coastal and open-sea navigation. Scattered along the coast of the Guiana Sheild, Kali’na people settled over a vast area currently divided among the modern countries of Venezuela, Guyana, Suriname, French Guiana and as far as the western bank of the Oyapock River in Brazil"

      • 4 months ago
        Anonymous

        The first canoe built by the Antillean Amerindian groups was called kuliala. This was a simple dugout utilised mainly for fishing and coastal navigation. The second type of sea craft was called kanawa (fig. 2). It was a large boat capable of transporting up to 40 people and was more specifically dedicated to inter-island navigation. The kanawa can be characterised as a dugout canoe expanded by firing and extended by framing and planking. The quality of the historical sources has allowed us to reconstruct the entire operational chain for the construction of this type of boat, from the decision to implement the process to the naming of the new canoe (Bérard et al. 2016a).

        • 4 months ago
          Anonymous

          But why though? Unironically.

  4. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    Heres your saladoid bro

  5. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    >things are amazing
    >literally no reason to leave
    >"why didn't they invest all their efforts into ships like europeans??"

    • 4 months ago
      Anonymous

      cope

  6. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    homosexual homini lupus, they had a choice between sailing out or dying after seeing their children enslaved.

  7. 4 months ago
    Anonymous

    You do understand that if they keep fishing around this region they will eventually find these islands? Especially boats that get lost

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *