Crime and Punishment

Svidrigaïlov was a straight up movie villain; all his scenes were so cinematic. How did Dostoevsky write him this way when movies hadn’t been invented yet?

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  1. 5 months ago
    Anonymous
    • 5 months ago
      Anonymous

      Sofya could also be bottom-right.

    • 5 months ago
      Anonymous

      porfiry saved that fricking book man

      • 5 months ago
        Anonymous

        Porfiry was annoying as frick man. He was such a mary sue, this book would read like a Sherlock Holmes story had it been from his pov and not the good ones.

        • 5 months ago
          Anonymous

          If my aunt had a dick she would be my uncle. Porfiriy was a smug, self-centered butthole who took great pride in solving what was in retrospect an obvious case. The interrogation scene perfectly shows off his character. You are reading the book from Raskolnikov's perspective and from those close to him who are obviously biased in their observation. It was fairly obvious to an outsider Raskolnikov did it due to the way he was acting throughout the book, even Svidrigailov figured out something was not right with him very fast.

  2. 5 months ago
    Anonymous

    >write up incel novella 150 years before incelism goes mainstream

    • 5 months ago
      Anonymous

      Except he actually does have sex with a hooker

      • 5 months ago
        Anonymous

        >with a hooker
        masturbation with extra steps

        • 5 months ago
          Anonymous

          True

  3. 5 months ago
    Anonymous

    Is it moronic to have a headcanon that Svidrigailov did nothing wrong? There were rumors that he raped some girl, killed his wife and made some people commit suicide, but nothing of it was ever confirmed. I don't know, but after his convos with Raskolnikov and after that scene with Dunya I've got that feeling that he was just larping being a bad person, like he was so much self hating that he wanted other people to have the same opinion on him, but deep inside wanted to help others.

    • 5 months ago
      Anonymous

      Dounia personally witnessed him act abusively towards some servants.

      • 5 months ago
        Anonymous

        I mean he may be a dick, I just don't really think he is a murderer child rapist.

        • 5 months ago
          Anonymous

          What about his dream?

          • 5 months ago
            Anonymous

            okay so he was a pedo, but he never did anything about it, his thoughts nonetheless were killing him and that's why he hated himself

    • 5 months ago
      Anonymous

      >I've got that feeling that he was just larping being a bad person, like he was so much self hating that he wanted other people to have the same opinion on him, but deep inside wanted to help others.
      Nahh, that says so much about you and what kind of person you are, every mentally sane individual can recognize how lecherous Svidrigailov is, and he clearly poisoned Marfa Petrovna to get on with Dounia. The only genuine good I saw in him was when he hesitated to grab Dounia after the first missed shot, and letting her go eventually, not because he's a good conscientious person, but because he was in love.

      • 5 months ago
        Anonymous

        he gave money to poor families

        • 5 months ago
          Anonymous

          an act of kindness keeping his guilt from swallowing whole, giving money is easy when you have money, even Mexican drug lords and Japanese Yakuza help the poor.

          • 5 months ago
            Anonymous

            *swallowing him whole

  4. 5 months ago
    Anonymous

    By the end of C&P, I found myself thoroughly moved/impact by Svidrigailov's suicide, in how he had such intense remorse for his baseness and cruelty. I once also read how water in C&P was a symbol of the depth of despair brought on by Raskolnikov's and Svidrigailov's sins, respectively. I'm reminded of the scene where Rodya is looking out on the water over the bridge and his mood begins to sour, but he doesn't completely capitulate to the mood, hence he is able to be redeemed by the end. In comparison with Svidrigailov, where the scene leading up to his death has the downpour of rain and heavy symbolism of water, which represents his anguish of conscience. It's nuance like that that makes me appreciate Dostoevsky as an author.

  5. 5 months ago
    Anonymous

    How do you guys apply that censor/spoiler thing while writing a post?

    • 5 months ago
      Anonymous

      Anon from the post about you, you have to surround your desired text in two sets of square brackets. In the first one, put "spoiler" and in the second put "/spoiler." so when you use it it will blackout your text.

      • 5 months ago
        Anonymous

        sorry meant *above you

      • 5 months ago
        Anonymous

        test

        • 5 months ago
          Anonymous

          I see

  6. 5 months ago
    Anonymous

    If you are alluding to Dostoevsky’s worst novels, then, indeed, I dislike intensely The Brothers Karamazov and the ghastly crime and Punishment rigamarole. No, I do not object to soul-searching and self-revelation, but in those books the soul, and the sins, and the sentimentality, and the journalese, hardly warrant the tedious and muddled search. Dostoyevsky’s lack of taste, his monotonous dealings with persons suffering with pre-Freudian complexes, the way he has of wallowing in the tragic misadventures of human dignity – all this is difficult to admire. I do not like this trick his characters have of ”sinning their way to Jesus” or, as a Russian author, Ivan Bunin, put it more bluntly, ”spilling Jesus all over the place." Crime and Punishment’s plot did not seem as incredibly banal in 1866 when the book was written as it does now when noble prostitutes are apt to be received a little cynically by experienced readers. Dostoyevsky never really got over the influence which the European mystery novel and the sentimental novel made upon him. The sentimental influence implied that kind of conflict he liked—placing virtuous people in pathetic situations and then extracting from these situations the last ounce of pathos. Non-Russian readers do not realize two things: that not all Russians love Dostoevsky as much as Americans do, and that most of those Russians who do, venerate him as a mystic and not as an artist. He was a prophet, a claptrap journalist and a slapdash comedian. I admit that some of his scenes, some of his tremendous farcical rows are extraordinarily amusing. But his sensitive murderers and soulful prostitutes are not to be endured for one moment—by this reader anyway. Dostoyevsky seems to have been chosen by the destiny of Russian letters to become Russia’s greatest playwright, but he took the wrong turning and wrote novels.

    • 5 months ago
      Anonymous

      Nabokov was a gooner.

      • 5 months ago
        Anonymous

        Dosto is essentially sadomasochistic, he loves dwelling on characters who revel in how depraved they are, but who also prostrate themselves in the just punishment or humiliation of their depravity. Again, sensitive murderers and soulful prostitutes imply the exact situation he adored, all the violence and sexual intrigue he desired so much, but with the approval of his super ego since they ritualistically degrade themselves in a kind of spiritual fetishistic pleasure in confessing, being punished, and then being "redeemed". It's lurid and partakes of a sick kind of gratification in self flagellation.

        • 5 months ago
          Anonymous

          Are you autistic?

          • 5 months ago
            Anonymous

            >Assuming it's one person
            Are you new to IQfy?

          • 5 months ago
            Anonymous

            >avoiding the question
            OK, I guess Dostoyevsky triggered your autism somehow

          • 5 months ago
            Anonymous

            I addressed the question, moron, it's a IQfy copy pasta that gets posted in the million different Dosto threads that put up each day. Does it hit a little too close to home on your favorite author?

          • 5 months ago
            Anonymous

            How low is your reading comprehension. I asked if (You) have autism, and then (You) responded by asking
            >Are you new to IQfy?
            Going to guess you have autism and you're mad as frick about Dostoyevsky because you got molested by a dude with a beard

          • 5 months ago
            Anonymous

            kek, you are literally moronic. I addressed your reason for asking the question, can you not understand motivations? Ironically, your obsession with autism and your inability to pick up on the fact that I addressed your question by addressing the motivation for asking it strongly suggest you, in fact, are autistic. But let me predict the future, your next reply will call me autistic again because you will revert to your comfort zone since your mind fixates on a single issue and can't think about anything else.

          • 5 months ago
            Anonymous

            >i uh avoided the question because i defintely dont have autism
            >proceeds to write a novel on how zher is worked up over a simple question
            it's okay bro relax, the bad man wont hurt you

          • 5 months ago
            Anonymous

            >(You)

          • 5 months ago
            Anonymous

            XD zher so silly!

  7. 5 months ago
    Anonymous

    Along the shore along the

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