>Debunks Christianity/Judaism

>Debunks Christianity/Judaism

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  1. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Care to elaborate?

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous
      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        They could've been in very limited use before that time, which is why they don't appear in the archaeological record. A similar thing happened with iron. It existed long before the "Iron Age" but it wasn't common.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          >They could've been in very limited use before that time
          Then show me the evidence
          >A similar thing happened with iron. It existed long before the "Iron Age" but it wasn't common.
          Which there is evidence for

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          when I was a young lad my dad told me the camel through the eye of the needle was a mistranslation and it was supposed to be thick rope through the eye of a needle instead

          but then why use it in the allegory instead of a more common animal that people are more familiar with?

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            This is from Exodus, not the parable.

            >They could've been in very limited use before that time
            Then show me the evidence
            >A similar thing happened with iron. It existed long before the "Iron Age" but it wasn't common.
            Which there is evidence for

            >Then show me the evidence
            The Bible.
            I'm not aware of any other evidence but that doesn't mean there isn't any, we just haven't found it yet.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            The Bible isn't archaeological evidence, and the overwhelming consensus is that Genesis was mostly composed during the exilic and post exilic periods, after camels were already domesticated in the region.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            Genesis is thought to have been composed with the other Pentateuchal books around the 7th century BCE at the earliest. It doesn't align with the narrative that Moses authored them, but that's a fundamentalist view that a significant portion of Abrahamic followers have reconciled anyways. You're not bringing anything new to the table that supports conclusions not already in circulation during biblical times.

            What's the proof that it wasn't authored by Moses? Documentary hypothesis isn't proof because it has nothing to say about books written by God. It only says that if a book is written by humans then it must be written by multiple humans. This is because we know how humans write books, but we don't know how God writes books.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            Ah, the apologetic approach:
            >Well, you can prove that my position is 100% impossible, so let's make up scenarios that aren't in evidence and assert they must be the case

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            How have you proven that my position is 100% impossible?

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            Ah, the apologetic approach:
            >Well, you can prove that my position is 100% impossible, so let's make up scenarios that aren't in evidence and assert they must be the case

            *can't

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            I see. Well, I'm not asserting that they MUST be the case, only that they CAN be.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            >where's the proof?
            >lists the proof
            While the documentary hypothesis isn't proof (no such thing when it comes to textual analysis), it's the most likely account assembled by textual analysis. It appears to be written from at least 4 sets of authors, has dual accounts for portions of Genesis and Exodus, and takes on consistent usage of different terms and narrative tones. Yes, there's the unfalsifiable claims you can make about that and literally anything else. But when you're considering what events are most likely and require the fewest amount of assumptions, you have to analyze data without presuppositions. It's natural to assume that humans wrote the book because we've only ever seen humans writing books. Furthermore, if you want to turn around and say "God wrote this" but offer no verifiable methods to distinguish those claims, you have to be willing to apply the same logic to any other text. Anything else "God wrote" circulated by that group of people you don't like becomes equally valid and divine as the text you support.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            >It's natural to assume that humans wrote the book because we've only ever seen humans writing books
            There's your problem. DH is irrelevant to the question we're trying to resolve. Why do we ask this question about the Bible and not every book? Because not every book claims to come from God. In terms of major world religions, it's pretty much the only game in town. Muslims also believe the Bible is from God, and the Hindus and Buddhists don't think you're wrong to follow it. On the contrary, they say you should follow the rite you inherited. A decent argument for its validity is the claim that the miracles in Sinai were witnessed by an entire nation of people. It's quite a difficult thing to fabricate, which is why no other religion claims an entire nation as its witnesses. They only have one person or a small group of people. I can't come to you with a religion that says your ancestors witnessed miracles because the obvious question from them would be "Why then am I hearing this for the first time? Why do I need to hear it from you?" It can only work if they're already familiar with the story.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            The documentary hypothesis doesn't even challenge scripture directly. Nor does it say anything about whether scripture is inspired by God. It simply puts together the most likely account of when and how it was composed. Nowhere in the Bible does it insist Genisis was originally written in Moses' time, nor does it directly or implicitly claim Moses authorship. That's all stuff that comes later when it's proposed by church authorities outside of scripture.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            insist the Pentateuch* was originally written in Moses' time

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            It says many times that Moses wrote down the word of God. Where is that text now if not the Bible? The idea wasn't invented by the Church. It was believed by the israelites long before.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            israeli tradition was attributing the teachings (Heb. lit "torah") of Moses to Moses. This was, for hundreds of years and including the times when the Pentateuch was redacted and compiled, exclusive to the laws in Deuteronomy and the ten commandments in Exodus. It wasn't until the Hellenistic period where authorship was beginning to be considered for the other books in the Pentateuch, and it wasn't until the Pharisees and Christ that we see literary evidence of certain parts of Leviticus being attributed to Moses. The Mosaic authorship movement (encompassing all 5 books of the Pentateuch) didn't take off until around 300 BCE. There were theologians arguing against it all the while, but it wasn't until the enlightenment era that most biblical scholars and theologians formed a consensus around multiple authors. The documentary hypothesis came about in the 19th century and has been the most widely adopted model since. israelites, Christians, and Muslims alike have adopted multiple authorship models and the Mosaic authorship model has been a fundamentalist view for some time now.
            When Jesus and his disciples are referring to Mosaic torah, it's understood that they're predominantly referring to the laws. There's a noticeable lack of reference to the teachings in the Hebrew Bible because they didn't traditionally attribute authorship, period.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            >when I was a young lad my dad told me the camel through the eye of the needle was a mistranslation and it was supposed to be thick rope through the eye of a needle instead
            this but it was a girl i slept with in university and the "Eye of the Needle" was a gate in Jerusalem that a laden camel couldn't fit through, I think Joel Osteen is teaching this

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        >Tel Aviv University
        I despise christcucks but you're giving them a point

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        >several centuries after they appear in the bible
        as in the date of authorship or the dates presented in the bible?

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Never trust (them)

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          Yeah that's why I don't trust the Torah.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Can you tell us the actual evidence for this claim?
        (99% the answer is "no, I just saw the headline")

  2. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Genesis is thought to have been composed with the other Pentateuchal books around the 7th century BCE at the earliest. It doesn't align with the narrative that Moses authored them, but that's a fundamentalist view that a significant portion of Abrahamic followers have reconciled anyways. You're not bringing anything new to the table that supports conclusions not already in circulation during biblical times.

  3. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Nerds getting into religion is one of the most annoying trends I've seen on the internet in a while

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