Did ancient Rome have youth culture?

Did ancient Rome have youth culture?

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  1. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mostellaria

    Yes. It was the same as ours.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      No cap?

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >another plagiarized greek production
      was plautus the biggest italic hack in ancient show biz?

  2. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    There was no mass media brainwashing creating another "in-group" for youth to be a part of. Perhaps if your son became an apprentice and moved to another town he would adopt their customs and when returning to visit would be all like "ugh, lame", but nothing like today.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      This

      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mostellaria

      Yes. It was the same as ours.

      Not this

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >tribalism didn't exist in ancient times
      Lmao

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Your tribe/in-group would be that of your parents. There was no Goldstein-Bergwitz productions blaring on Roman televisions and Roman zoomers speaking African-American vernacular.

        • 1 week ago
          Anonymous

          Plenty of israelites in the Roman Empire so the same thing would happen if TVs existed

  3. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    THEY DIDN'T HAVE BUSSIN HAIR IN AINCENT ROME!

  4. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >YWN be bussin around with roman hoodrats
    It is not giving frfr no cap ong

  5. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Yes, the tradition of "devious licks" (as the modern youth calls it) originated during St. Augustine of Hippo's adolescence, during which him and his friends stole a pear for no reason other than entertainment and swagger.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Boomer is at least 10 years behind on his slang

  6. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    It was like a clockwork orange, they'd go around beating people up for no reason.

  7. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I know it's old hat, but let is go back to Herculaneum and Pompeii graffiti

    >Samius to Cornelius: go have a nice day!

    >“May he who vandalizes this picture incur the wrath of Pompeian Venus” was written over the picture in question.

    >O walls, you have held up so much tedious graffiti that I am amazed you have not already collapsed in ruin
    This one supposedly a variation that was put on other walls. In other words, the seconds memes could happen, they did. Also joke stealing for clout.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Nothing about that says "youth". Your association with crassness and graffiti with "youth" is a social construct.

  8. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    If by youth culture you mean dying in mines or in trades usually before you reached the ripe old age of 30, then yes. The vast majority of men experienced such youth culture in the Roman Empire.

    If you mean did they have broccoli haircuts and a soundcloud mumble rap equivalent, maybe. Broccoli was domesticated by Etruscans, what better way could the MENA transplants of the empire express their Italian-ness than to adorn the local flora on their heads?

  9. 1 week ago
    Anonymous

    >[Vos mea dēseruit iam verpa] dolēte puellae
    >Weep, girls for my penis has deserted you
    >Pēd[īcat cūlum] cunne superbe vale
    >It has anal sex with butts now, you arrogant c**ts. Bye-bye!

    What did the youth mean by this?

  10. 1 week ago
    Anonymous

    Apparently during Justinian's youth a popular habit of the Costantinopolitan youngester was to dress up as Huns (or at least wear what they tought were hunnic clothes), including growing their hair long, and wandered around the streets doing pranks, petty crimes, and pretending overall to be badass barbarians

    • 1 week ago
      Anonymous

      so the self-absorbed "le important revolutionaries who will change the world" kind of teenager homosexualry is not something new?

      • 1 week ago
        Anonymous

        >Literally never mentioned changing anything except dressing like foreigners
        lol seethe harder old man

    • 1 week ago
      Anonymous

      It was happening even earlier, you could always spot the rebellious roman teen who was wearing pants, dyed blonde hair, and sporting a mustache.

  11. 1 week ago
    Anonymous

    Rome definitely had a street culture, it was even highly influential politically during the late republic, apparently baggy clothes was even in vogue at that time

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