Do colors really have a psychological impact on us or is it all just cultural?

Do colors really have a psychological impact on us or is it all just cultural?

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  1. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    homie really, our survival depended on associations with color, colors definitely have a psychological impact

    >red
    pussy, lips, sweet, sweet fruit

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      >red

      Blood

  2. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Light is scientific, but also psychological. We live in a psycho-physical reality. Light emits vibrations, frequencies and so forth into your eyes. Freud's first work was actually in optics. Read into it, but the gist is that yes colors impact you across cultures.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      THANK YOU SO MUCH I COULD KISS YOU. ALL OF THESE PEOPLE NEED TO LEARN ABOUT BRAIN ENTRAINMENT AND THE HOW PARTICULAR FREQUNCIES ARE GOOD FOR US, INCLUDING RED LIGHT AND DELTA WAVES

  3. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    They have a psychological impact on us BECAUSE it is cultural. Cultural and physical.

    Remember Seinfeld episode with the red neon sign on Kramer's apartment? Light affects us and different wavelenghts affect us differently, but that only goes to a certain extent. When you hear stuff like "fast food use warm colors to make you eat faster and feel more hungry", part of it is physical, but most of it is cultural.

    In graphic design, some colors will be seen as modern or old, but that changes, if every modern company decides for a purple logo, soon it will be seen as old. It's hard to look at bright pink and not think of feminine Barbie like things, but there is nothing inherent to the color that makes it so. Blue is statistically the most favorite color in the world, hence why social media or other companies that aim to be generic often have blue logos rather than pink ones.

    Just don't take too seriously, most of it is just obvious common sense, hospitals can't have bright saturated colors flashing to their patients, if your house is totally grey and black with white light, that's depressing.

  4. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    There is a paradox concerning Red and Blue, the former color is actually the most relaxing color to our eyes despite being associated with passion, whereas the latter color is actually the most disruptive to our eyes despite being associated with calmness

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      That happened only after the introduction of artificial lights able to emit strong blues. Before that intense blue light was a sunny day thing, completely opposed to night and its terrors.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        I always associated red with night time and blue with day time for a similar reason and implement that color scheme into my art. It's what I see in reality.

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          As for me I associate green with the natural and magenta with the supernatural

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            nice, i also associate deep blue with sleep and magenta with dreams

  5. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Yes
    There's a reason why psychologists tend to wear colored clothes.
    It makes them look friendlier, which is essential in their profession.

  6. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Both, plus subliminal. I deciphered their code.

  7. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >is it all just cultural
    many african tribes don't have the concept of blue and green. they're the same color to them. wouldn't be surprised that some of their people don't have the genetics to see blue.
    sometimes I, too, can't differentiate between blue and green, probably cause I was half drunk.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      It's not genetic, it's cultural. In ancient Greece they also did not have a word for blue separate from green. These distinctions are a linguistic thing.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        what

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          [...]
          >so if we had no words for green even tho our eyes detect it distinctly from other colors, then we wouldn't be seeing green? how would it look to us? other color? which one? or would we see it as gray?
          You see the same color, but you call it "blue" or something like that. The names are invented, there are no "7 colors of the rainbow", it's all made up and it depends on how you use them and the need you may have to differentiate them. They are just wavelengths, how we perceive them and categorize them is up to us.

          Someone who is not into colors all that much may call both a magenta and a vermillion "red". If you're looking for someone in a crowd in a magenta shirt you just say "he is wearing red". That should work, it won't be confused for blue or yellow. But if you are mixing paint you must know the difference between a magenta, a red and a vermillion.

          here

          In Spanish, red is "rojo", in Portuguese, red is "vermelho" which takes its name from vermillion, but means red, so they are not calling it wrong, it's their name for the color red. Now "rojo", "rosso" and "rouge" all come from the same root meaning red, but in Portuguese the word "roxo" means purple. These things are totally a linguistic thing.

          In design we work with different color spaces, these color spaces are more precise because they take from the CMYK (cyan magenta yellow black[key]) for printing and RGB for digital. Even so, each OS and software will have different color profiles based on different color spaces, hence why colors may come out all wrong in printing if you don't know how to navigate that. The Pantone colors for example give us a code to each one of them that you can reproduce in paint.

          You never had a discussion about a blue wall that some other person calls it green? Then some smartass comes saying it's actually teal. All language.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        >In ancient Greece they also did not have a word for blue separate from green. These distinctions are a linguistic thing.

        >is it all just cultural
        many african tribes don't have the concept of blue and green. they're the same color to them. wouldn't be surprised that some of their people don't have the genetics to see blue.
        sometimes I, too, can't differentiate between blue and green, probably cause I was half drunk.

        >many african tribes don't have the concept of blue and green.
        I've read this before. It is very interesting to think about. Language has more of an effect of how we think and perceive the world than we grant it, I feel. At the same time, I don't think we should ignore biological explanations. Leaves/trees are green. Blood is red. The sky is blue. It makes sense (to me) that these colors inherently have different effects on us.

    • 2 months ago
      haskellpilled

      color perception (if you're not colorblind) is totally up to language, different cultures assign different importance to colors and so some get names and others don't, the japanese had no word for orange and a loooooot of languages don't differentiate blue from green or pink from red

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        language in this case is a way to describe a race's perception of the world. they are not that separate. I am saying there could be races that cannot differentiate between blue and green because they perceive those two as the same color.

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          so if we had no words for green even tho our eyes detect it distinctly from other colors, then we wouldn't be seeing green? how would it look to us? other color? which one? or would we see it as gray?

          >so if we had no words for green even tho our eyes detect it distinctly from other colors, then we wouldn't be seeing green? how would it look to us? other color? which one? or would we see it as gray?
          You see the same color, but you call it "blue" or something like that. The names are invented, there are no "7 colors of the rainbow", it's all made up and it depends on how you use them and the need you may have to differentiate them. They are just wavelengths, how we perceive them and categorize them is up to us.

          Someone who is not into colors all that much may call both a magenta and a vermillion "red". If you're looking for someone in a crowd in a magenta shirt you just say "he is wearing red". That should work, it won't be confused for blue or yellow. But if you are mixing paint you must know the difference between a magenta, a red and a vermillion.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        so if we had no words for green even tho our eyes detect it distinctly from other colors, then we wouldn't be seeing green? how would it look to us? other color? which one? or would we see it as gray?

  8. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    The colors are more important than you could possibly imagine

  9. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    You know what's been fricking me up lately? People raised without words that distinguish between colors are physically less capable of perceiving those colors than other people. I hate it so much.

  10. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Red light helps you see in the dark. Blue light keeps you awake.

  11. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Guys, when you think about it, Green being bright to us makes no sense.
    You'd think that it's the most abundant color in nature and thus logically our eyes should be the most sensitive to it, until you realize it doesn't really makes sense.
    Because Green is the most common color in nature, it would've been much more practical for non-green colors like Red and Blue to appear brighter to our eyes to more easily detect fruits amongst the greenry and yet here we are with Green standing out instead.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      None of these colors are brighter than the other, your question makes no sense.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        Are you stupid? Green is brighter than other colors and it's a scientifically known fact that our eyes are wired to be most sensible to it.

  12. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    have you ever heard of baker-miller pink? apparently it calms someone down, leading a prison to be painted in the colour. if you really think about it, people from all colours and places and ethnicities go to that prison, yet it still could lead to less aggression? why so you may ask? i think its psychological with a mix of culture, because in places you could see red for stop/angry/bad etc and green for go/good etc and it could be taught with the traffic lights. but in some places the traffic lights are different colours, which could lead for colours to represent different meanings to them. overall its a mix of both.

  13. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    ya forget orange, between red and yellow
    ya forget azure, between blue and cyan
    ya forget violet, between blue and magenta
    ya forget rose, between red and magenta
    ya forget chartreuse, between yellow and green
    ya forget a lot of things

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Stfu

  14. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Yes

  15. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    No

  16. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    You forget tur, between blue and purple

  17. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    If Blue carry high energy, wouldn't Cyan and Magenta also carry high energy due to being variants of Blue?

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      The visible spectrum goes from red to violet, violet being the one of the highest frequency. Beyond the visible spectrum you have ultraviolet (higher frequency) and infra red (lower frequency) besides other electromagnetic waves. Being of higher frequency means it collides with more stuff, hence why ultraviolet can burn and microwaves can cook. The lower frequencies are used not to clash with stuff, which is why a photographer's developer room has dim red light, enough for him to see, but not of much impact on the photography paper and chemicals. X-ray is another example, it can go beyond our skin, but will reflect on denser materials like bones and lead.

      We have three cones in our retina's cells that intake short, medium and long waves within the visible spectrum, they are combined in our brains to form the colors. Magenta is a result of these brain calculations, which is why some people say they magenta "doesn't exist", it's a combo of short and long waves which is unlike the middle range (closer to green).

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        You did not answer the question whatsoever, wouldn't Cyan and Magenta also carry the high photon energy of Blue because they are colors made from Blue?

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          magenta IS blue + red photons. cyan can be blue + green or cyan photons.

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          Color is perceptual, they are not "made from blue" because there is no such thing, only high frequency and low frequency and anything in between. Your brain receives the mixture of frequencies and creates the perception of color. Magenta is a bright blue and bright red lights combined, so high and low frequency together. Photon energy is proportional to frequency.

          When people say one color is made of another they are mostly talking about the world of paint, so if you mix yellow paint and red paint you get an orange color, but on a microscopic level nothing was mixed, you can break apart the compounds that created the mixed pigment. In print you use CMYK system, that is, how much cyan, magenta, yellow and black is in a given color, so if you want red you need to mix yellow and magenta, if you want blue you mix cyan and magenta, if you want green you mix yellow and cyan. In light, the colors are RGB because they refer to our tricone vision, but that's still a simplification, each of the cones take a broader range of frequencies, they just peak somewhere in those areas. So if you want cyan you mix blue and green lights, if you want yellow, red and green lights, if you want magenta blue and red lights.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        Magenta still "exists" as much as any other colour, it's a specific field excitation which our brain associates with a colour

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          >it's a specific field excitation
          cone excitation. we see colors depending on how much R/G/B cones are stimulated

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            And what do you think is stimulating them?

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            light clearly. just that light stimulates the cones not the brain. the brain doesn't directly experience light. "colors" is just info received from the cones. remove the cone and input the correct electrical signal and you'd still see that color. and it wouldn't be created by light.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            https://i.imgur.com/Jh4kvlZ.gif

            And what do you think is stimulating them?

            Ask yourself if you can imagine colors, or if you see colors in your dreams, you technically ain't receiving any physical light present here

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            What the frick are you smoking, moron, I said in my first post that colour is a construct of the brain, but that colour is associated with a specific wavelength, which magenta has, because despite being a "combined wavelength" it still propagates as a singular wave on the quantum scale

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            So you have Asperger syndrome, got it, you can leave the thread now if you don't want to pollute it further.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous
          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            Why did you post an image of yourself being ridiculed?

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            I see you have trouble with reading, as well.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            Why are you projecting your problems into me?

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            *onto
            as in it ontologically follows that without the prerequisite interaction with electromagnetic waves your brain wouldn't have associated anything with colours and there would be no "electrical signal", in fact the electrical signals you are talking about are themselves electromagnetic phenomena and no different from the stuff hitting your cones

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            shut up idiot

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          I agree, that's why I used the quote marks.

  18. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Now that I think about it, magenta is the only color that is honest about being a ghost, whereas yellow and cyan can be deceptive pieces of shit

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      >yellow and cyan can be deceptive
      and I think white but I'd have to test it. there should be a mix of orange and some lighter blue that stimulate all color cones to make for white light. in this case you'd have two colors (wavelengths) making white, instead of three for RGB.

      https://i.imgur.com/BkdOne0.jpeg

      Color is perceptual, they are not "made from blue" because there is no such thing, only high frequency and low frequency and anything in between. Your brain receives the mixture of frequencies and creates the perception of color. Magenta is a bright blue and bright red lights combined, so high and low frequency together. Photon energy is proportional to frequency.

      When people say one color is made of another they are mostly talking about the world of paint, so if you mix yellow paint and red paint you get an orange color, but on a microscopic level nothing was mixed, you can break apart the compounds that created the mixed pigment. In print you use CMYK system, that is, how much cyan, magenta, yellow and black is in a given color, so if you want red you need to mix yellow and magenta, if you want blue you mix cyan and magenta, if you want green you mix yellow and cyan. In light, the colors are RGB because they refer to our tricone vision, but that's still a simplification, each of the cones take a broader range of frequencies, they just peak somewhere in those areas. So if you want cyan you mix blue and green lights, if you want yellow, red and green lights, if you want magenta blue and red lights.

      our cones are the firewall for "outside". whatever goes to them can vary, like green+blue OR cyan photons, but from eyes to brain you'd have the very same signals. so "energy" is about how much it stimulates one of the three color cones.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        >and I think white but I'd have to test it. there should be a mix of orange and some lighter blue that stimulate all color cones to make for white light. in this case you'd have two colors (wavelengths) making white, instead of three for RGB.
        Well that's how opposite colors work, if you mix Green light with Magenta light it will make white, if you mix Yellow light with Blue light it will make white, if you mix Cyan light with Red light it will make white

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          >Green light with Magenta
          ye but those are three wavelengths, it's literally mixing RGB photons, clearly white. the point is you could get white with only two wavelengths, which makes for "fake" white

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          but ye cyan photons + red should also make white, and yellow +blue photons. the idea is to stimulate all three types of cones equally

  19. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    people in this thread are completely moronic, colors are not related to wavelength at all and magenta is one hint at such thing

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      all of them are absolutely related to wavelength in our brains, else your colors would constantly randomize. even if the brain made them up.

  20. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Are you one of those morons who wanna surprise the world with a new "all colors are equal" theory?

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