Do people even use the top bar?

Do people even use the top bar?

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  1. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Ubuntu should have kept the global menu bar.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      This. Unity was a great foundation for Linux GUIs going forward, it just needed to ditch the focus on mobileshit. Ironically, one of the biggest issues that MacOS has been suffering from is that it's becoming more of an iOS derivative than the other way around.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        I think that's a pretty short-sighted look at things, no offense, anon. I think iOS/iPadOS are the future of MOST computing for normal people. I think they're not quite there yet, but they're getting there fast, especially with the new AI features coming over the next year or more. When somebody thinks of a good idea for iOS/iPadOS, if it makes sense, then it's a good idea to back-port that idea to the old-fashioned windows-and-mouse computer interface of macOS. Some people seem to believe that windows-and-mouse is the be-all-end-all of human-machine interaction. These people are quite wrong.

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          >iOS/iPadOS are the future of MOST computing for normal people
          In a lot of ways, this is already true.
          >When somebody thinks of a good idea for iOS/iPadOS, if it makes sense, then it's a good idea to back-port that idea to the old-fashioned windows-and-mouse computer interface of macOS
          This is not. Certain backports are fine, for example System Preferences being redesigned to resemble System Settings on iOS or trackpads supporting multi-point gestures. Others like the Launchpad or the Control Center should be left on mobile where they belong.

  2. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Yes, especially if you're using a new app and aren't yet familiar with everything it does, or what the default keyboard shortcuts are for non-standard commands. Also, the main app menu (in boldface, to the right of the Apple menu) always tells you which app you're currently in, and you can use the Help menu to search through the entire set of menus (and the app's helpbook, if it has one). And if you're not inclined to use keyboard shortcuts, you can always slam your mouse pointer to the top of the screen, knowing all the standard functions are where they should be (settings, hide app, new file, open / close file, cut / copy / paste, undo / redo, search, minimize / expand / tile window, switch to another window, etc).

    The menu bar is one of the best things about the Mac as far as usability, that seemingly no one else in the industry seemingly understands or appreciates.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >The menu bar is one of the best things about the Mac as far as usability
      Except when you have two windows open and don't know wtf owns the current bar. Almost as if binding this strip to the appropriate window was the logical choice all along. Inb4 mac copium

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        What do you mean? The name of the focused application is in the bar.

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          Yes, that's what i mean
          There's a few clues telling what's the active window and it's irritating, not only to windows users but macgays too (seen it myself).
          Basically the window control dots give it away (coloured vs greyed out), but then again there are coloured dots everywhere and it's just a distracting mess. Glad i don't have to shill for it...

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Hey moron it says “finder” at the top so you know that “finder” is the focused window

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            It doesn't say "finder" in the active application you absolute idiot. Especially new users have no idea what the top bar does when, stop coping

            So it's superfluous on top of ambiguous? Ok
            Strange how you sound like linuxgays justifying the terminal though

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Oh sorry you can’t even use the terminal? now I know I’m speaking with a moronic person, carry on.

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            You'll get to windows level eventually. I remember macgays arguing how "snapping windows is not needed on mac" until it's been made a feature recently kek. Delusional. Another example why one bar for 3 apps is bad design

            >Implying
            Pretty sure only jobs was the one to hate terminals, as his "le fricked up" quote is posted here daily.

            This might be more your speed

            >Closed down uncustomisable proprietary toy
            So...a mac?

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >I remember macgays arguing how "snapping windows is not needed on mac" until it's been made a feature recently kek

            Microsoft had a patent on window snapping that only expired in the last couple years.

            >Yes it is. 3 apps open: finder settings pictures.

            You're clearly too fricking stupid to tell the difference between a single-window app and a multi-window one. Do you think there can only be a single Finder window open at a time? A single Safari window? A single Preview window?

            >It's unintuitive design. Make one instance that expands upon interaction

            So, like a hamburger menu? Are you saying that an arbitrarily located hamburger menu is better than a menu bar that is always accessible from the same place?

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >think there can only be a single
            Stop derailing. It doesn't matter in this example and it ads nothing to the discussion. If ypu can have a billion finder windows open, the reasonable choise would be writing a caption like
            >Finder (1) - stephen

            >So, like a hamburger menu?
            With limited screen space (smartphone)? Yes
            On a desktop screen? No that's moronic af, hence apple does it.

            >suppose you wanted a quick copy-paste through the menu. Now you're moving your mouse halfway across the diagonal for 3 times, selecting the app and such

            That's why context menus and keyboard shortcuts exist. Are you being deliberately obtuse?

            >That's why context menus and keyboard shortcuts exist. Are you being deliberately obtuse?
            By this logic you don't need menues to begin with. Just content and no navigation aid whatsoever. Bad faith argument...

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >On a desktop screen? No that's moronic af, hence apple does it.

            What the frick are you even saying? You were just saying you wanted the menu bar replaced by a hamburger menu in every window, and now you're saying it's bad and that Apple does it? Do you have brain damage?

            >By this logic you don't need menues to begin with. Just content and no navigation aid whatsoever.

            Yes, especially if you're using a new app and aren't yet familiar with everything it does, or what the default keyboard shortcuts are for non-standard commands. Also, the main app menu (in boldface, to the right of the Apple menu) always tells you which app you're currently in, and you can use the Help menu to search through the entire set of menus (and the app's helpbook, if it has one). And if you're not inclined to use keyboard shortcuts, you can always slam your mouse pointer to the top of the screen, knowing all the standard functions are where they should be (settings, hide app, new file, open / close file, cut / copy / paste, undo / redo, search, minimize / expand / tile window, switch to another window, etc).

            The menu bar is one of the best things about the Mac as far as usability, that seemingly no one else in the industry seemingly understands or appreciates.

            already explained why the menu bar is uniquely useful, apart from toolbars, context menus, and shortcuts. It's the foundation that underpins those secondary UI features. You're just too dumb and buckbroken by Windows and Linux pajeetware to grasp any of this.

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >What the frick are you even saying? You were just saying you wanted the menu bar replaced by a hamburger menu
            That's what you implied because itoddler brain knows nothing else
            Meanwhile the best example is

            >you can't combine two menus into one without a hamburg-ACKKKK

            >Do you have brain damage?
            No because I don't use macs daily, thank God for that.

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            This might be more your speed

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >It doesn't say "finder" in the active application you absolute idiot

            The active application isn't a single window, frickwad. That's just your ingrained moronic winbabby conditioning.

            >So it's superfluous on top of ambiguous? Ok

            The menu bar presents the complete browsable searchable directory of available commands at a glance alongside keyboard shortcuts. The toolbar is a way of getting at a customizable subset of those commands via graphical widgets within the current window. They're complementary.

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >The active application isn't a single window, frickwad.
            Yes it is. 3 apps open: finder settings pictures.
            Macgays can't even their own system lmao

            >They're complementary.
            They are logically connected but visually separated, stop coping. It's unintuitive design. Make one instance that expands upon interaction

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >It doesn't say "finder" in the active application

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            It doesn't.
            But it says "preferences" in preferences window.
            Which is just a moronic inconsistent clusterfrick

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            You're confusing windows with apps. How old are you?

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            probably.
            it amazes me how anon hasn't realized the name in the top bar is that of the application, not that of the focused window

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Copium
            In this very example, window = app

            You can tell by looking which is the topmost window.

            See

            You'll get to windows level eventually. I remember macgays arguing how "snapping windows is not needed on mac" until it's been made a feature recently kek. Delusional. Another example why one bar for 3 apps is bad design

            >Implying
            Pretty sure only jobs was the one to hate terminals, as his "le fricked up" quote is posted here daily.

            [...]
            >Closed down uncustomisable proprietary toy
            So...a mac?

            Yes you can tell by the active window control elements (often people can't though). But suppose you wanted a quick copy-paste through the menu. Now you're moving your mouse halfway across the diagonal for 3 times, selecting the app and such. If every window had its own menu, it would be more efficient on top of being more visually clear.

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >suppose you wanted a quick copy-paste through the menu. Now you're moving your mouse halfway across the diagonal for 3 times, selecting the app and such

            That's why context menus and keyboard shortcuts exist. Are you being deliberately obtuse?

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Lmao just cause you closed the window doesn't mean you closed the program. That's why you have to quit after. You also really only actively use 1 window at a time, you don't have 2 mice. I don't see the issue here besides different = bad. It even says in apple dev shit that windows are more like documents and the app manages documents. Just cause you put the document away doesn't mean you're done editing documents.
            >Now you're moving your mouse halfway across the diagonal for 3 times, selecting the app and such.
            Can you not fricking alt tab? Also how is moving your cursor to the same spot on a global menu less efficient that moving it to 3 different places all over the screen?

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Sorry but i prefer something to close when i press X. I also prefer not memorising keyboard shortcuts i don't have to to navigate an otherwise unintuitive gui, all while pretending a terminal was somehow evil.

            If that means i have to pay less for hardware and software so be it 😉

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Cmd+Q force quits the program, the x button just closes that window. Atleast learn the very fricking basics before you start complaining

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Also to all the fricks shilling multiple windows one app. You've been proven wrong. Tabs are more useful.

            >Shills for key binding again
            Kek. That example is even moronic in itself, because alt+q is @ sign on a pc/linux. Which means you'll close your email window just from muscle memory

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Tabs don't let you see two windows at once. You're limited to just one view at a time.

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Then how come ctrl+n opens a new window instead of a new tab?

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Tabs are new, ctrl+n is legacy.
            Messing with people's muscle memory is always bad

            >Tabs are more useful.

            macOS had a tabbed file manager (and a tabbed text editor, image / PDF annotator, word processor, spreadsheet app, etc) several years before Microsoft got around to it. You can have both multiple windows and tabbed windows, with standard keyboard shortcuts to switch between all of them to boot. Crazy, I know.

            In og windows, the start bar was the tab bar, especially in fullscreen. But windows has adapted upon feedback, so why can't mac?!

            its the equivalent to alt+f4

            Yes i know. It's still unfortunate

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Unironically it's due to muscle memory.

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >windows has adapted upon feedback, so why can't mac?!

            Because having a single menu bar at the top plus toolbars and tab bars in each window is the correct desktop UI design. The fact that Microsoft has to overhaul the taskbar and Start menu and force its users to re-learn everything yet again every few years should be a obvious indication that Windows's UI is fundamentally broken and shitty.

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >Tabs are more useful.

            macOS had a tabbed file manager (and a tabbed text editor, image / PDF annotator, word processor, spreadsheet app, etc) several years before Microsoft got around to it. You can have both multiple windows and tabbed windows, with standard keyboard shortcuts to switch between all of them to boot. Crazy, I know.

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            its the equivalent to alt+f4

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Why the hell would you use the option key to execute commands? That's what the — hold on to your butt — COMMAND key is for. Option is like a second shift key that gives you alternate glyphs for each key.

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Muscle memory. If you write an @ sign like you're used to in windows, on a mac, you close the whole window. Disaster. The reverse case isn't as bad.

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            @ is shift 2, weirdo.

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            TO BE FAIR both are true in relation to different apps. Some apps have multiple windows and some have a single window which, when closed, quits the app. This is not good, but it's something we live with because nobody's figured out a better idea yet.

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Yeah but also, it hasn't been necessary to quit open apps in macOS for over a decade now. If you switch away from an app and don't use it for a while, the OS automatically swaps it out of RAM. The only real reason to Cmd + Q any more is to shorten the Cmd + Tab app switcher, or to remove non-pinned apps from the Dock.

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            That's true, and it's a great feature, but unfortunately the OS still retains the legacy concept of "open" apps and "closed" apps that dates back to the original Macintosh. We'd all be better off if that went away, like on iPadOS.

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            It's not legacy there are certain paradigms built off of it that would have to be entirely replaced.

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Right. But my point is they've BEEN replaced in modern operating systems; modern OSs don't have the concept of "open" apps versus "closed" apps. Your apps are simply available to you at all times. This is how it should be.

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >modern OSs don't have the concept of "open" apps versus "closed" apps.
            Wrong, zoomer.
            Your generation can't find files within folders

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Documents are largely irrelevant to normal people. What are you going to do, sit down and type a letter to your grandma? Probably not very often if ever. The idea of computers as document processors dates back to the 80s but isn't really valid any more.
            t. gen xer who's tired of all the bullshit

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >We'd all be better off if that went away, like on iPadOS.
            Zoom zoom.

            >windows has adapted upon feedback, so why can't mac?!

            Because having a single menu bar at the top plus toolbars and tab bars in each window is the correct desktop UI design. The fact that Microsoft has to overhaul the taskbar and Start menu and force its users to re-learn everything yet again every few years should be a obvious indication that Windows's UI is fundamentally broken and shitty.

            >is the correct desktop UI design.
            But it isn't, and you can't explain why it is. Similar functions should be in similar visual spacial proximity, everything else is copium.

            >windows has adapted upon feedback, so why can't mac?!

            Because having a single menu bar at the top plus toolbars and tab bars in each window is the correct desktop UI design. The fact that Microsoft has to overhaul the taskbar and Start menu and force its users to re-learn everything yet again every few years should be a obvious indication that Windows's UI is fundamentally broken and shitty.

            >and force its users to re-learn everything
            Ribbons exist since 2007.
            The start menu has the same functionality (starting programs) with various designs reflecting various screen types popular at the appropriate times (4:3, 16:9, touch, 4k today).

            @ is shift 2, weirdo.

            On a mac. On a windows its alt+q. Reasoning ability 404

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            No, you apparent moron, the "@" symbol has been shift-2 on all keyboards since the 60s. Even before that it was commonly true on typewriters.

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Not on my german keyboard.

            Documents are largely irrelevant to normal people. What are you going to do, sit down and type a letter to your grandma? Probably not very often if ever. The idea of computers as document processors dates back to the 80s but isn't really valid any more.
            t. gen xer who's tired of all the bullshit

            Wat. Shut your mouth broccoli hair, because your shit's all moronic...

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Windows has alt tabbing and didn't even get a proper terminal until like vista and they had to redo it twice.

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Ms dos prompt

            Tabs don't let you see two windows at once. You're limited to just one view at a time.

            You can take the tab out if you wish, by dragging. Cool, huh???

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            I said a real terminal.

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >If every window had its own menu
            Then you'd be hunting for those menus.

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >iBlack folk unironically have to constantly check the top left corner and be force reminded he's using a gay fruitbook just to check what program is currently active
            LOL
            LMAO EVEN

            meanwhile linchads just go to the window they want and know already the menu bar is specific for that application

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >Literally two menu bars for every window
            Anon...

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            How it actually works on mac
            >switch to window
            >click on window
            >window you clicked on is now the active window

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            linux is ugly as frick holy shit

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >iBlack person calling anything else ugly

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Why can't linux do type properly? You can always identify linux screenshots at a glance by how astonishingly amateurish the typography looks. Do linux people just not understand it?

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            bruhg, just stfu

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Yes, that's what i mean
        There's a few clues telling what's the active window and it's irritating, not only to windows users but macgays too (seen it myself).
        Basically the window control dots give it away (coloured vs greyed out), but then again there are coloured dots everywhere and it's just a distracting mess. Glad i don't have to shill for it...

        skill issue. you know you still have a toolbar in each window, right?

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        You can tell by looking which is the topmost window.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      I've known Mac Users (actual Apple fans) which are DEVELOPERS who didn't know the top bar changes depending on context. That should prove that it's a shit design and a bad UX.
      In windows it's absolutely clear what it does and which application it belongs to

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        I'm sorry that you have stupid friends but anecdotal evidence doesn't prove anything, other than that you have stupid friends

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Stop calling it "top bar." It's the menu bar. It's been the menu bar since the early 1980s, long before you were born.

  3. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Rarely. Most of the time I'm using keyboard shortcuts, toolbar, or context menu. The only time I use the menu bar is if it's a new app I'm not familiar with, or a rarely used function like "Bookmark Manager"

  4. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    mac os would be usable if they would stop that autistic "hey lets stick all the menubar controls of the active window in the top bar" shit.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      it's an incredible thing. lets say you open photoshop. you just need to know parts of the name of the filter/feature you are searching for.

      I understand that GNOME and linux have no usecase for it though. It's not really hard to learn the 2 programs that work on linux (blender/gimp)

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      You can always hide it and pretend it doesn't exist if it triggers you so much. You still have toolbars and context menus.

  5. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >Do people even use the top bar?
    sometimes, when you use a rarely used feature of an app.. I use it liek 5 times per month.

    Still good to have it though.

  6. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I like the notchbooks since the topbar doesnt occupy any of the 16:10 screenspace and the dock is always hidden.

  7. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Most people here can’t afford it in the first place. So sad.

  8. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    You mean the menu bar? Yes. That's where all the menus are. Menus expose the program's various functions.

  9. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >iBlack folk
    >people

  10. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    MacOS is designed from the ground up to be easy to use and some of you are still too fricking dumb to figure it out

  11. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >you can't combine two menus into one without a hamburg-ACKKKK

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Do you know what happens when you have more than 7-8 items at a time in your combination menu bar + toolbar? You end up with a small button on the right edge of the window that opens a "junk drawer" menu containing all of the additional commands that didn't fit, probably outnumbering those that did, because they were pushed out by the big colorful Fisher-Price icons.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >Do you know what happens
        Not really. Because you can remove all the junk you don't usually need...

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          "I have to spend time customizing my app's UI to make it usable." How about instead they just get it right the first time?

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            How about you stop making up bullshit? There are 30+ icons on each of the 3 windows, and no "junk compartment" needed. And this is fullHD, not even 4k resolution...

            But let me guess, customisation is le bad xDDD, until apple does it. Like themed icons on a phone

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Of course customization qua customization isn't bad. What's bad is NEEDING to customize your human-machine interaction paradigm in order for it to be basically useful to you. The fact that you can make it good (by your own personal definition of good) doesn't change the fact that it's bad.

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >NEEDING
            It looks like this by default. How is it unusable?

            Hi, what is the standard location to get to an app's settings in this UI?

            Is there a standard search box somewhere that I can bring up to quickly find the command I'm looking for?

            How can I find out what keyboard shortcuts correspond to each command?

            I don't know what version number I'm currently running, how can I do that?

            >standard location to get to an app's settings in this UI?
            Yes. Something like File -> settings iirc

            >standard search box
            Yes

            >How can I find out what keyboard shortcuts correspond to each command?
            Yes, picrel. Press alt button

            >I don't know what version number I'm currently running, how can I do that?
            System

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >Something like File -> settings iirc

            Can you show me where that is exactly? Is that standard across all apps? And why would the settings be in the File menu? Does my file have its own settings?

            >Yes

            Where exactly?

            >System

            Where is that? And is that for the OS or the current app? If it's for the OS, where would I find the app version? And is it in the same place across all apps?

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Hi, what is the standard location to get to an app's settings in this UI?

      Is there a standard search box somewhere that I can bring up to quickly find the command I'm looking for?

      How can I find out what keyboard shortcuts correspond to each command?

      I don't know what version number I'm currently running, how can I do that?

  12. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Why is the dock not a panel though? People like seeing parts of their wallpaper when an app is maximized?
    Windows panel is smarter. Everything in the same place, covers the whole width of the screen, got useful clock and system settings, and the menu bar when needed is inside the window so it does not get confusing with multiple windows open.
    I use linux but I always gravitate to windows style desktop no matter the DE, they nailed it in 95 then perfected it in 7. 11 even made it worse removing the staet menu and icons from the left so they move around depending.
    I believe Apple uses this dock with large icons because it looks good on store shelves instead of being useful for the user, and the top panel because they need somewhere to put the "ugly" clock and status icons. So much wasted space.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      The vast majority of Mac users have their dock set to auto-hide.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      the first thing most people do is set the dock to auto hide. The menu bar takes up no screenspace on the newer macs

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        You can set the menu bar to auto-hide as well. OP is just making shit up to get mad about because his baby duck syndrome is getting triggered.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >menu bar takes up no screenspace
        Because the notch does kek

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          They replaced the bezel was on the m1 with the menubar. I have an m2, Its not an issue

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            I wouldn't be surprised if the bezel on the right was all off-switched diodes of the screen. Kek, it's a feature™

  13. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    [...]

    >Usually yes. It's somewhere in the menues, usually under "file" or "edit", and up to the developer to decide.

    Ok, so it's not standard then. Do developers at least use consistent naming, so that I can just look for "options" or "settings" or "preferences" but not all three?

    >Yes.

    So if I go to Options in the File menu, the options only apply to the current file? It's not for the application as a whole?

    >Start menu -> search

    You didn't read what I asked for. I want a search box so that I can quickly search through all the commands in the ribbon bar. Can I do that? And is it in a standard location across all apps?

    >Start -> control panel

    Ok, I'm in Control Panel. Now where would I find the OS version?

    >Within the app

    OK, where would I find that exactly? And would I be able to find that in the same place across every app?

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >Do developers at least use consistent naming,
      Developers are free to develop however they wish, including names. How would you force someone to name x a certain way? Fees?

      >So if I go to Options in the File menu, the options only apply to the current file?
      Depends upon the dev, but usually yes. There are general file settings (corresponding to eg ALL .txt files), sometimes there are document settings (just for current.txt). But all within said app

      >Can I do that?
      If the dev programmed it that way, sure.

      >Now where would I find the OS version?
      System

      >where would I find that exactly?
      Usually under file (FILEsettings) or edit (edit settings). Sometimes under window (WINDOWsettings). But you've asked that already. It's not obvious where to find settings on a mac either from the way it's worded, if that's what you imply.

      [...]
      >Control Panel

      Sorry, I only saw Settings in my Start menu. Where do I find Control Panel?

      Pictel. Buy glasses

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >How would you force someone to name x a certain way? Fees?

        No, just by having a standard way of exposing an app's settings via API. I guess Microsoft doesn't provide this to developers?

        >It's not obvious where to find settings on a mac either from the way it's worded, if that's what you imply.

        How so?

        >Pictel. Buy glasses

        Sorry, my taskbar and Start menu don't look like that. Where is Control Panel? Should I go to Settings? Are they the same?

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          >standard way of exposing an app's settings via API.

          What if the dev writes his own nonstandard solution? Can he do that? Why can't someone write however he wants to for his machine?

          >How so?
          Where are settings in eg

          Yes, that's what i mean
          There's a few clues telling what's the active window and it's irritating, not only to windows users but macgays too (seen it myself).
          Basically the window control dots give it away (coloured vs greyed out), but then again there are coloured dots everywhere and it's just a distracting mess. Glad i don't have to shill for it...

          ?
          Apple button?
          File?
          Edit?
          View?
          Go?
          Window?
          I can't tell really

          >Sorry, my taskbar and Start menu don't look like that.
          Then just search for it, or look until you find something similar and make a shortcut to taskbar. Look for a magnifying glass. The magnifying glass icon (), represented by U+1F50D in Unicode, has evolved into a universal symbol for searching and zooming functions in digital interfaces. Originating from its practical use for detailed examination and discovery, it has been adopted by modern computer software and websites to denote tools for users to find information or closely inspect content
          >https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Magnifying_glass

          I hope this helps you becoming a computer literate person anon. Good luck:)

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >Can he do that?

            Yes, but it would make the experience worse for end-users who expect the app's settings to be in the same place as all of their other apps.

            >Where are settings in eg

            Yes, that's what i mean
            There's a few clues telling what's the active window and it's irritating, not only to windows users but macgays too (seen it myself).
            Basically the window control dots give it away (coloured vs greyed out), but then again there are coloured dots everywhere and it's just a distracting mess. Glad i don't have to shill for it... ?

            Finder -> Settings
            if it were Safari, it would be Safari -> Settings
            if it were Microsoft Word, it would be Microsoft Word -> Settings

            it's telling that your Windows brain overlooked the one menu in boldface that happens to not exist in Windows

            >I hope this helps you have your brain broken by Windows pajeetware

            ftfy

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >Yes, but it would make the experience worse
            So it's up to the developers, is your argument?
            And windows with about x100 more devs, will also have x100 the variety? Cool argument

            >Finder -> Settings
            Why not go -> settings? I want to go to settings menu. If the menu bar is system wide, why doesn't it open system settings? Can i "Go" to another inactive window on desktop? Why not? Why doesn't "Window" menu list all windows currently open on desktop?

            >the one menu in boldface that happens to not exist in Windows
            Then why does the setting icon appear (gears) in

            Yes, that's what i mean
            There's a few clues telling what's the active window and it's irritating, not only to windows users but macgays too (seen it myself).
            Basically the window control dots give it away (coloured vs greyed out), but then again there are coloured dots everywhere and it's just a distracting mess. Glad i don't have to shill for it...

            ? Are there two types of settings?
            Do the gears open settings of that one window, or is it case-sensitive upon the active window? Will it change picture settings if i select the pictures window, then click on gears?

            🙂
            ^^ even

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >So it's up to the developers, is your argument?

            No, I'm saying that Apple provides a standard way for developers to expose common functions in their apps, such that users come to expect said functions to be found in the same places in every app, making for a better user experience. Why is it so hard for Windows apps to consistently expose the same functions without a menu bar, if the menu bar is such a dumb shitty idea for gay homosexual brainwashed Mac sheeple? Why is it ok for Windows users to have to remember where the settings are in each individual app they use?

            >Why not go -> settings?

            You've clearly never used a Mac, so I'll explain this to you. The Go menu is a non-standard menu (in contrast to File, Edit, View, Window, Help) in the Finder, used to navigate through the filesystem, as well as to connect to network file shares. It's a file navigation menu for the file manager app, get it?

            >If the menu bar is system wide, why doesn't it open system settings?

            That's in the Apple menu, which pertains to system-wide functions like log out, shut down, restart, etc. plus it's where you can pull up your system info (including OS version) with one click. Imagine that!

            >Why doesn't "Window" menu list all windows currently open on desktop?

            Because menu bar menus belong to the current app, not the entire desktop. You can still right-click an app's icon in the Dock if you want to get a list of its windows without first switching to the app.

            >Then why does the setting icon appear (gears) in

            Yes, that's what i mean
            There's a few clues telling what's the active window and it's irritating, not only to windows users but macgays too (seen it myself).
            Basically the window control dots give it away (coloured vs greyed out), but then again there are coloured dots everywhere and it's just a distracting mess. Glad i don't have to shill for it... ?

            Because, as is typical for non-Mac users, you are seizing on a years-old outdated version of the OS to make a weak argument.

            What you are referring to is called the Action menu, which is just the Finder context menu accessible from the toolbar rather than via right-click. Prior to 2020, the glyph for the Action menu toolbar button was indeed a gear. It's since been changed to a more standard "..." glyph. Feel better now?

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >Why is it so hard for Windows apps to consistently expose the same functions without a menu bar
            It's not. It's called registry, a way for all software to permanently store settings as flags within one application, and up to the dev to use it. Just type regedit into search to reg(estry)edit. Does mac have such an app?

            >non-standard menu
            How do i know this?

            >used to navigate through the filesystem,
            Why not through the apple system? Theres an apple within the menu strip that is desktop-permanent. Surely go must navigate me through the desktop

            >Apple menu
            I thought that was just a logo? Why isn't it spelled out? Why isn't there an apple button on my keyboard, if it's system wide and not depending upon an active window?

            >Because menu bar menus belong to the current app, not the entire desktop.
            But you said the apple was system -wide? Why isn't "window" then window-wide?

            >Because, as is typical for non-Mac users, you are seizing on a years-old outdated version of the OS to make a weak argument.
            Oh i didn't know that. Surely you didn't mind spanning from 2k to 11 prior, so i just returned the favour

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >I thought that was just a logo?

            Ok you know what, I'm not gonna bother any more since I'm clearly debating a moron who's never even touched a Mac yet is quite confident he already knows everything there is to know about using one. Typical.

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >yet is quite confident he already knows everything there is
            But why did I ask questions, if i knew beforehand anyway? Surely asking rhetorical questions and filibuster are to be avoided in a discussion because it's rude and doesn't help the OP...

            >I'm not gonna bother any more
            It's ok. Mac users have a shorter attention span. You need flashy lights and eyecandy least you get bored. Sorry i could not provide you with instant gratification, maybe your iMusicGarageBandFotoboothGamecenter will do so. good luck itoddler 🙂

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >What you are referring to is called the Action menu, which is just the Finder context menu accessible from the toolbar rather than via right-click. Prior to 2020, the glyph for the Action menu toolbar button was indeed a gear. It's since been changed to a more standard "..." glyph. Feel better now?

            So if i click "..." within the finder app while the photo app is selected, will photo settings open? Is it dependant upon the active window just like the menu bar at the top?

  14. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    [...]

    >Control Panel

    Sorry, I only saw Settings in my Start menu. Where do I find Control Panel?

  15. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >a bunch of morons arguing about miniscule OS differences
    I love these threads

  16. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    No because people don't use MacOS. Subhumans do though and it doesn't matter be cause actually using it is less important than people know you have it.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      t.uses pirated windows

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