Does anybody here know anyone who got into Jane Street?

Does anybody here know anyone who got into Jane Street? I would be surprised than a JS or ex-JS employee even browses IQfy for a second anyway. I was just curious was the target schools for this place is. Is it really a lottery every time or is there a formula?

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  1. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    unfortunately they don't accept ESLs
    the easiest way to get hired by them is to know OCaml like the back of your hand and make contributions to the compiler

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >the easiest way to get hired by them is to know OCaml like the back of your hand and make contributions to the compiler
      is this true? where did you hear this?
      I would assume you mean to become a dev and not a quant

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        I'm curious, why OCaml? Are they the only ones who use it among quant trading firms, or is it a popular lang in the field overall? I thought quant devs were more about C++, Python and R, alongside some ASM for HFT.
        [...]
        >quant
        You will never become a quant unless you hold a PhD in math or theoretical physics from Harvard/MIT/Stanford/Caltech/Oxbridge.

        jane street is well known for how much they love OCaml, they maintain the compiler and majority of their techstack is in OCaml
        https://www.janestreet.com/technology/

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          Any other examples of quant firms using an unconventional language?

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            no idea, I wouldn't doubt there are others considering jane street has talked extensively about how their choice of language has attracted extremely high quality devs

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >IQfy can't stop talking about how functional programming languages are a huge meme
            Will this board ever stop being wrong?

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            OCaml is not a functional programming language. It's ridiculously imperative and I wish this FP association would die.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            What are some "real" functional languages aside from Haskell and Scheme, then?

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Erlang.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            lean4, idris2, haskell, there are a few. scheme is also true.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >scheme is also true.
            what? I typed that? scheme is also not one. ffs. am I having a stroke?
            scheme is garbage for morons.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Those are pure functional langs but you can have a language which supports or encourages FP without necessarily forbidding imperative programming.
            The reverse is true, you wouldn't say C++ isn't imperative just because you can do FP with it.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >unconventional language
            Supposedly K is quite popular in that space.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            hedge funds. standard chartered use their own version of haskell. i believe man financial use c# / f# .

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          yes everybody knows that but I doubt learning Ocaml is going to land you a job, most certainly not as a quant
          Ive looked into their interview process at least for becoming a quant and it is purely a logical reasoning/probability test, essentially an iq test

          that's definitely not what they say on their application forms.

          thats what I thought

          I'm curious, why OCaml? Are they the only ones who use it among quant trading firms, or is it a popular lang in the field overall? I thought quant devs were more about C++, Python and R, alongside some ASM for HFT.
          [...]
          >quant
          You will never become a quant unless you hold a PhD in math or theoretical physics from Harvard/MIT/Stanford/Caltech/Oxbridge.

          >I'm curious, why OCaml?
          one of the founders just really liked Ocaml and basically forced his will on the company and at the time and still today pretty much theyre the only people using it
          >more about C++, Python and R, alongside some ASM
          people dont write pure ASM, they write c++ then look for ways to optimise snippets of generated ASM
          rust is also finding use these days with smaller and newer firms

          >You will never become a quant unless you hold a PhD in math or theoretical physics from Harvard/MIT/Stanford/Caltech/Oxbridge.
          not remotely true
          its quite meritocratic
          it doesnt matter where you come from you just have to be insanely smart and be able to prove it to them

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Oh so it's not because OCaml is somehow better for the job, it's just that they like using it.
            >pure ASM
            I know, but aren't HFT firms very autistic about extremely low latency applications, thus requiring their devs to be very good at low level programming?

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >I know, but aren't HFT firms very autistic about extremely low latency applications, thus requiring their devs to be very good at low level programming?
            you conflate low-level programming with handwriting ASM
            sometimes it's better, sometimes it's not
            often it's just not worth the extra time needed to craft ASM that is faster than what your compiler outputs, vs spending that time on other parts of the software

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >You will never become a quant unless you hold a PhD in math or theoretical physics from Harvard/MIT/Stanford/Caltech/Oxbridge.
            kek no
            [...]
            >unfortunately they don't accept ESLs
            >the easiest way to get hired by them is to know OCaml like the back of your hand and make contributions to the compiler
            Both untrue
            [...]
            140+IQ and genuine enthusiasm for tech.
            That's it.
            If you're older, it helps if you've already worked at a competing firm.

            Yes
            Friends work at JS, I work at a rival.
            There’s no screening for “target schools.” Nobody gives a frick about your degree. Your CV should display competence in either maths or CS depending on what you want to get in.

            This is probably the hardest way I know of to get in kek

            >you should have a clearly demostrated enthusiasm for the field
            >we only look at top schools and phd's

            Do people hear themselves when typing their posts? They do not care about your school or phd. Anyone can get in as long as they have demonstrated that they are capable. Top schools and phds coincide with experience but are by no means a requirement.

            I find it hard to believe that the recruiting process is just 100% meritocracy by testing your raw intelligence
            A high IQ doesn't automatically make you knowledgeable about the applied math these companies use. Are you saying I can just waltz into their offices, request an interview, and if I solve some high-tier autism puzzles (i.e. IQ tests) well enough, they'll make me a quant? Seems really far-fetched

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            You're moronic, don't @ me ever again
            It's obviously not just an IQ test you microcephalic.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            I would bet a large amount of money that I am more intelligent than you. Stay in your lane, midwit.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Much seethe, very wow

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Prove it. You won't because you can't.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      I'm curious, why OCaml? Are they the only ones who use it among quant trading firms, or is it a popular lang in the field overall? I thought quant devs were more about C++, Python and R, alongside some ASM for HFT.

      >the easiest way to get hired by them is to know OCaml like the back of your hand and make contributions to the compiler
      is this true? where did you hear this?
      I would assume you mean to become a dev and not a quant

      >quant
      You will never become a quant unless you hold a PhD in math or theoretical physics from Harvard/MIT/Stanford/Caltech/Oxbridge.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >You will never become a quant unless you hold a PhD in math or theoretical physics from Harvard/MIT/Stanford/Caltech/Oxbridge.
        kek no

        unfortunately they don't accept ESLs
        the easiest way to get hired by them is to know OCaml like the back of your hand and make contributions to the compiler

        >unfortunately they don't accept ESLs
        >the easiest way to get hired by them is to know OCaml like the back of your hand and make contributions to the compiler
        Both untrue

        https://i.imgur.com/rDAbETt.png

        Does anybody here know anyone who got into Jane Street? I would be surprised than a JS or ex-JS employee even browses IQfy for a second anyway. I was just curious was the target schools for this place is. Is it really a lottery every time or is there a formula?

        140+IQ and genuine enthusiasm for tech.
        That's it.
        If you're older, it helps if you've already worked at a competing firm.

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          >kek no
          You're delusional. These are some of the most competitive positions in the world and available spots are extremely scarce. Without a PhD you're NGMI regardless of what else you bring to the table, and even with a PhD from a high tier university, you need to demonstrate you're actually quant material. Don't give this dude false hopes.
          Renaissance Technologies doesn't even look at your resume (even for an internship) if you don't have a PhD from a world top 25 institution, maybe even top 10.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            you dont know what youre talking about

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            What's the point of all this? I've heard that working in finance is absolutely soul sucking, there's no remote and you're constantly monitored, down to how many hours you spend in your chair. If it's for the big money then wouldn't just starting a roofing or cement business be a much easier path to riches than years of fanatical study, credential collecting, grinding, interning and interviewing. Every roofing or cement business owner is loaded and lives in a mansion and owns multiple sports cars.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            ... and with massive chronic back pain whether it does or doesn't work out

            its always better to be paid for what you know

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            lol, how is anybody on IQfy going to start a roofing or "cement" business? I would bet money (lots) that you dont even know there is a difference between cement and concrete.

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          Yes
          Friends work at JS, I work at a rival.
          There’s no screening for “target schools.” Nobody gives a frick about your degree. Your CV should display competence in either maths or CS depending on what you want to get in.

          This is probably the hardest way I know of to get in kek

          >competence in either math or CS
          What exactly are they looking for, what's the skill set you need to have?

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >basic level stats questions
            >basic arithmetic
            >some integral techniques from analysis under your sleeve
            >basic coding competency
            I'm not sure what else you need. Just do a math undergrad course, pass with flying colors because you actually understand everything (no, a B in algebra or number theory will not suffice) and you're golden
            >hurr durr why aren't you working at Jane Street then
            They're one of our clients. ~~*They*~~ submit to me

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            An IMO gold medal should do the trick.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >An IMO gold medal should do the trick.
            What about undergraduates? ICPC? NSA Codebreakers?

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          A close friend works there; he has a relevant PhD at a top school, Interned with them, and it helps he is enthusiastic about their choice and treats it as a dream job. His salary is near million. He is extremely smart and a workaholic and very confident so access the interview, wasnt stressed.

          Probably the easiest way in is relevant PhD at top school, but that opens many doors... I'm guessing getting in as a pure random coder is a total crapshoot.

          For what it's worth, he loves his job and his colleagues are really cool, he hangs with them and they have fun on and off for. He works from office since it's so nice there. They are hiring heavily still apparently.

          "Kek no" is true but it's disgusting how much top school cred makes the rest of your life easier

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            damn, sounds awesome but it's probably too late for me. Im starting college at 22, I imagine if I ever somehow get to a t10 for even a masters I would be graduating at 28. it really is too late.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            I dont work in the industry but Ive researched it and I would assume most of their new hires dont have PhDs
            your best bet is to study statistics/actuarial science and apply for an internship (dont be afraid to apply more than once (within reason))
            and even if you dont get into jane street in particular, youll have plenty of employment options elsewhere with a stats related degree

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >"Kek no" is true but it's disgusting how much top school cred makes the rest of your life easier
            What makes it disgusting? The one guy I know from my public high school who got into Harvard absolutely deserves to be there.
            I mean you're sort of making it sound like getting in is entirely un-meritocratic. There are DEI polices and legacy admissions, but I can't imagine it's to a suffocating degree.

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          it's funny how chuds are just porn addicts

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          A close friend works there; he has a relevant PhD at a top school, Interned with them, and it helps he is enthusiastic about their choice and treats it as a dream job. His salary is near million. He is extremely smart and a workaholic and very confident so access the interview, wasnt stressed.

          Probably the easiest way in is relevant PhD at top school, but that opens many doors... I'm guessing getting in as a pure random coder is a total crapshoot.

          For what it's worth, he loves his job and his colleagues are really cool, he hangs with them and they have fun on and off for. He works from office since it's so nice there. They are hiring heavily still apparently.

          "Kek no" is true but it's disgusting how much top school cred makes the rest of your life easier

          https://i.imgur.com/rDAbETt.png

          Does anybody here know anyone who got into Jane Street? I would be surprised than a JS or ex-JS employee even browses IQfy for a second anyway. I was just curious was the target schools for this place is. Is it really a lottery every time or is there a formula?

          this guy works at Jane street and he only has a bachelor.
          I guess you can get in if you pass their pretty hard Math Test with flying colors

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            quintessentially canadian

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            notice he is fluent in Hebrew

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            thats a weird jeet. His Hebrew and Mandarin skills got him in I guess not many people who know both well.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            I think it's a larp, he says a lot of seriously dumb shit on his channel

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >this guy works at jane street
            no he doesn't
            >only has a bachelor
            the few guys at jsc that didn't finish uni or didn't even bother going there were perfect-scoring imo, ipho and/or ioi
            even infra jannies at jsc are usually grads

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >ipho and/or ioi
            what does this mean

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            International physics olympiad, the other idk I'm guessing informatics or smth

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      that's definitely not what they say on their application forms.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Yes
      Friends work at JS, I work at a rival.
      There’s no screening for “target schools.” Nobody gives a frick about your degree. Your CV should display competence in either maths or CS depending on what you want to get in.

      This is probably the hardest way I know of to get in kek

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Did you get in fresh out of college or with work experience before hand?

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          I had a postdoc before I went into a research position. I went through the JS interviews but went with someone else in the end. I haven’t had another “real” job besides academia and quantgayging.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            what field for your doctorate? pure math?

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Yes

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            might be grasping for hopium here but do you know of anyone in the industry who dropped out of college/doesnt have a degree?

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            I know people can say anything on the internet but you’ll have to trust me when I say they do not give a frick about your degree. I know some places do. JS isn’t one of them. There is a huge number of Australians in their HK office. How many big name universities do you know in Australia? That should tell you how much they give a shit about name brands.
            I don’t know anyone with no degree altogether but I do know plenty who have degrees in completely unrelated fields like medicine. If you can make a case with evidence that you have skills then you’ll be given as much of a shot as anyone else.

            [...]
            [...]
            [...]
            I find it hard to believe that the recruiting process is just 100% meritocracy by testing your raw intelligence
            A high IQ doesn't automatically make you knowledgeable about the applied math these companies use. Are you saying I can just waltz into their offices, request an interview, and if I solve some high-tier autism puzzles (i.e. IQ tests) well enough, they'll make me a quant? Seems really far-fetched

            It’s not “an IQ test” kek, these guys have no idea what they’re talking about.
            How it works for trading is you have about four or five rounds of maths based interviews. No behaviourals. The first one is pretty easy and they’ll gradually ramp up the difficulty as you go. The questions are often probability based, a lot of games with a probabilistic element involved, and often a question will add more and more moving parts until you might have something that isn’t exactly solvable and you’ll need to approximate something.
            It doesn’t really matter so much if you can’t answer all of them right, what matters is how you think and approach the problem. It’s fine to get some wrong (I know I did).
            They also have a very distinctly Olympiad feel to the problems as well, much much more than other places (e.g. Optiver is relatively easy by comparison - they pretty much just prioritise speed to much greater extent but the problems are actually much more straightforward).
            The last day is an on site interview and it’s basically a full day of interviews where you’ll be given some chips to “gamble” with. It’s quite intense (understatement), but also quite fun.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >tfw finishing up a master's in data science and was thinking about going the PhD route focusing on probability theory
            Working at one of these places sounds like it'd be fun

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >jane street competitior
            >2sigma engineer spotted

            urgent question can I get in with a masters in pure/applied math with rigorous courses from a higher tier university (global)? I dont want to do a PhD in matrix groups but ill do a masters

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            I've definitely taken an IQ test while applying for quant dev jobs before. As an automated pre-screen though.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            oh also, Im trying to break into the industry and would really appreciate it if I could pick your brain about some stuff over email

            Ive been working on some "quant research" related personal projects and was able to at least get an interview at a small firm I wont name based on that alone, so I think that tells me Im not a total buffoon
            just have some nagging questions about what you actually do on the job (as far as you can say without divulging trade secrets) and Id like your advice on which essential topics I should learn, what personal projects would be best to work on next, etc (Im particularly interested in various options arbs, currently trying to learn how vol ""arb"" works but its still very nebulous to me)

            anyway, I dont expect anything but I would very much appreciate it if you could drop a burner protonmail email
            my burner address is:
            [email protected]

            so if you do drop an email, look out for an email from that address (or email me directly)
            thanks

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            What role do you want? I can let you know broadly what the interview would be like if you let me know specifically what role you want because if it isn’t my role I can’t say anything useful.
            Be specific about what you want to do rather than the title you think you’re after because different places have different roles for traders and researchers

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >different roles for traders and researchers
            Not him but what's the concrete difference?
            Quant researchers only come up with the mathematical models, and quant traders implement and use them (with help from quant devs)?

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            It just depends on where you are. Like for example JS uses trader as a really generic role where you can actually do quite a lot of different stuff whereas other places are quite strict that a trader is doing a few very specific duties and they stick to that. Researchers are generally doing stuff that tells a trader when a trade is good, broadly speaking. There are other things you might do as well. But in research you’re generally going to spend a few months on a project. I hear it’s a bit different at other places so I can only speak for myself. You kind of have to just ask them what the role is.

            well I think Id want to be a researcher mainly but the thing is I dont know exactly what that entails and what the difference is precisely between researchers and traders
            do traders exclusively do discretionary trading? do researchers come up with the strategies and signals for the traders? I thought strategies were largely automated, so I was under the impression the researchers might come up with algos and then pass them off to the low level guys to turn it into a production execution algo
            I really just dont know what these roles mean precisely

            about myself, I mainly just like spending my time looking in obscure places for alphas (currently low liquidity ghettoes that arent profitable for big firms), skimming financial literature and implementing stuff but dont particularly care for discretionary trading or even making money trading at the moment

            Traders can definitely work on more algorithmic stuff, but a big part of why the role works is often because you might have an idea that needs to be implemented quickly (simple example - Musk made a tweet, you have to react) but you don’t have time to code this up while the opportunity is there. So the trader needs to make a decision. I don’t make trades but they’re mainly concerned with short term quick decisions.
            As for getting a job, if research is what you want I’d recommend a few things that I needed to get hired:
            1. Basic coding
            2. Probability and statistics. Pretty obvious - this has to be strong.
            3. Linear algebra. Important part of handling massive amounts of data.
            4. Statistical learning. A lot of places will give you some kind of data problem where you’ll have to predict something. You don’t need to know how to make fancy models. But you should know simple ones well.
            5. You’ve got to know how to approach research. This is a huge thing but it’s the biggest reason we don’t hire that many undergrads. The issue is they don’t know how to handle failure and 90% of research is failure. They get overwhelmed by big problems way too easily.
            If you’re interested in finance then cool, but I had 0 finance knowledge and it made no difference. They teach you whatever you need to know on the job.
            Hope that helps, good luck.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            thanks

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >in research you’re generally going to spend a few months on a project.
            This sounds more interesting than having to make very quick decisions to react to the market, imo. Are the requirements for this kind of position (regardless of the firm) substantially different from what you outlined in the second part of your post? Generally speaking, I'm more interested in modeling and prototyping than making quick trades, even though I'm guessing the latter pays more.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            I don't know how to answer "regardless of the firm" since I'm only employed at one. Generally what I mentioned would be the basic requirements for a research job.
            I will say, and this may be a real minority opinion, that I found Optiver to be a lot easier than its pay would suggest. I don't know why. I just didn't find their research interviews that challenging. The hardest part was this stupid online screening process where you just need to blitz out answers extremely quickly. But after that it was surprisingly not very challenging. Apparently they fire very aggressively though.

            >Friends work at JS, I work at a rival.
            How did your friends get jobs at JS but you didn't?

            I had a JS internship offer for a few months later, vs a full time exploding offer elsewhere. I don't know if I made the right call but I wasn't sure if I'd get a full time offer since JS hates hiring without internships first, and they only offer trader internships, not research ones (at least, at the time that's what I was told). I was just sick of being poor after postdocs and wanted to guarantee I had something.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            sweet, youre back so I can bother you more
            does JS prefer to hire fresh grads over experienced people in the industry? or is everyone in the industry bound by non compete agreements?

            JS is probably sweet but t.b.h I feel like Id rather work at a small comfy <20 employee prop shop
            Im sure some of their hip compeititors like two sigma are also pretty sweet to work at

            unrelated question, do you have any favorite textbooks/papers where I could learn about vol arb

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >comfy <20 employee prop shop
            Wouldn't those be even more competitive?

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            oh actually I have a more urgent question: should I apply to positions that are across the globe that I can relocate for?

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            well I think Id want to be a researcher mainly but the thing is I dont know exactly what that entails and what the difference is precisely between researchers and traders
            do traders exclusively do discretionary trading? do researchers come up with the strategies and signals for the traders? I thought strategies were largely automated, so I was under the impression the researchers might come up with algos and then pass them off to the low level guys to turn it into a production execution algo
            I really just dont know what these roles mean precisely

            about myself, I mainly just like spending my time looking in obscure places for alphas (currently low liquidity ghettoes that arent profitable for big firms), skimming financial literature and implementing stuff but dont particularly care for discretionary trading or even making money trading at the moment

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            What kind of financial literature do you like perusing?

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            stat arb literature, Avellaneda (PBUH)

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            well I think Id want to be a researcher mainly but the thing is I dont know exactly what that entails and what the difference is precisely between researchers and traders
            do traders exclusively do discretionary trading? do researchers come up with the strategies and signals for the traders? I thought strategies were largely automated, so I was under the impression the researchers might come up with algos and then pass them off to the low level guys to turn it into a production execution algo
            I really just dont know what these roles mean precisely

            about myself, I mainly just like spending my time looking in obscure places for alphas (currently low liquidity ghettoes that arent profitable for big firms), skimming financial literature and implementing stuff but dont particularly care for discretionary trading or even making money trading at the moment

            I guess to be even more specific my main market is crypto options/perps

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >Friends work at JS, I work at a rival.
        How did your friends get jobs at JS but you didn't?

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        I'm starting at a lower tier Chicago firm (one of the more fratty ones that pays less, you might know it, they have a bar in the office). Any tips on how to succeed and not get laid off? I'm not doing quant work but I'll be working on large-scale backend data aggregation, if that helps too.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      lol no. They put you through the same bullshit interviews as everyone else. You have to be Richard Eisenberg and personally headhunted by Ron Minksy to not have to jump through their interview bullshit.

      https://i.imgur.com/rDAbETt.png

      Does anybody here know anyone who got into Jane Street? I would be surprised than a JS or ex-JS employee even browses IQfy for a second anyway. I was just curious was the target schools for this place is. Is it really a lottery every time or is there a formula?

      They have a terminal case of NIH syndrome. Terminal. OCaml is cool though.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      I fricking hate Ocaml. Sebastian Joosten, if you just happen to be browsing this thread like the autismo you are, FRICK YOU!

  2. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    If you want to get in, be a woman with a math degree

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >Does anybody here know anyone who got into Jane Street?
      As a dev or a quant?
      You can get into trading as a dev with just a strong resume and some experience in a feeder company like a gayMAN or fintech firm.

      >be a woman with a math degree
      I wish I were a high IQ woman with a math degree unironically 🙁

      i don't get the allure of HFTs. there are tons of successful small businesses started by uneducated hicks that generate revenue in the millions and are much easier to start than getting into an HFT that pays significantly less.

      It was considered the "top" of the tech field for a while when gayMAN was stagnating and HFTs were shitting so much money they were paying 7 figures to people in their 20s.
      Imo right now AI research is above it

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >AI research
        This is PhD only right?

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          >This is PhD only right?
          Almost certainly yes. I'm sure if you're extremely driven with just a masters you can make it as well.
          Every industry has mustangs that found another way to break in, but it's so rare that you have to somehow both really want it and also can't go for the traditional path.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            What are the odds as an undergraduate to cold email thousands of professors to become a research slave? should I even bother?

            also, if one's dream goal (so, in all likelihood not going to make it but not impossible) was to end up in an HFT or quant HFT as an undergrad, would it be better to choose relevant research or an internship? Or would you do an equal combination? Thanks brah

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >What are the odds as an undergraduate to cold email thousands of professors to become a research slave?
            Does your uni have any official undergrad research programs? How competitive are you for an REU?

            >end up in an HFT
            As a quant or a software developer?
            You don't need a masters to be a dev at an HFT, you don't even need to go to a top school. But you're gonna need some other signal to get their attention like multiple internships at companies of gayMAN or above status
            As for how someone becomes a quant as an undergrad I have no idea. I don't think it's impossible but I don't know anyone who did it.

            >would it be better to choose relevant research or an internship
            Probably would depend on the specific offers.

            >Thanks brah
            Don't take everything I say too seriously. I never did research and I don't work at an HFT so none of this is my own experience, just people I know who work there.
            Personally I only did internships at tech companies and went straight to gayMAN after undergrad. After 2-3 years there I can easily get an interview at any finance firm that isn't rentech, but I'm not smart or driven enough to pass them.

            I struggle to see for which tasks a PhD in CS would be needed though. I mean a master's is sufficient for AI jobs

            >I struggle to see for which tasks a PhD in CS would be needed though.
            I assume most if not all research scientists at a place like openAI or anthropic have a phd.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >gayMAN or above status
            What's above?

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >What's above?
            Places like nvidia, unicorn startups, fintech, other trading firms, probably some research labs I'm not familiar with
            gayMAN is the end goal if all you want is a corporate 9-5, but a lot of the innovation and talent is found in smaller organizations.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >I assume most if not all research scientists at a place like openAI or anthropic have a phd.
            Research scientists maybe, but AI jobs as a whole?

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >but AI jobs as a whole?
            Nah a masters is enough for that

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            I struggle to see for which tasks a PhD in CS would be needed though. I mean a master's is sufficient for AI jobs

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >AI research
            This is PhD only right?

            a phd in what, math, cs? I am doing a math masters in probability and so far we have only studied a bunch of esoteric stuff, and I have a buddy doing an cs ai program and similarily there the situation is not much better.

  3. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Is Rentec still the hardest company to get into? I wonder which technologies these guys use.

  4. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Did a infrastructure interview for internship. Passed first interview which is ironically the best one since you interview with an actual infrastructure engineer, mostly talk about experience and practical knowledge.

    2nd interview was a coding test. Problem was a coding question that needed progressively more features. I was able to solve it but did not get the minimal algorithm version at the time. Probably a day after the interview I realized I needed a queue for the last part of the question to get the fastest algorithm.

    For their coding interviews you need to get the fastest (lowest Big O) code, having functional code is not enough. Probably should have leet code studied before hand, oh well.

    In third interview they would take you out to NYC.

    For full time positions they do 5 interviews. Most interns do not get a return offer, but the pay is insane because interns get like 50k working the summer.

    >t. Undergrad CS at big state school (T20, not T10 for CS).

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      What's the best way to learn algorithms optimization?

  5. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >you should have a clearly demostrated enthusiasm for the field
    >we only look at top schools and phd's

    Do people hear themselves when typing their posts? They do not care about your school or phd. Anyone can get in as long as they have demonstrated that they are capable. Top schools and phds coincide with experience but are by no means a requirement.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      When it comes to shit like proprietary trading, useful people without credentials are extremely rare. Even MBAs had to get their official parasite licenses.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        ḾBA's are mostly useless in my experience if not backed up by a bachlor in science or math/economics.

        Think of it this way, it is hard NOT to get credentials if you are truly good at something, however the statment that people only look at americans/people from good schools is not really true.

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          >mostly
          That’s generous. I’ve never seen an MBA make a positive contribution to anything, personally. It’s the OG meme degree.

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          >Think of it this way, it is hard NOT to get credentials if you are truly good at something
          not really, just dont go to school

  6. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Is it easier to get a quant job at a bank than at an actual quant shop or hedge fund?

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Bank

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Why?
        I assume it's partly because bank quant jobs are not US-only?

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          There are also non US Quant firms, with XTX probably being the most prominent. If you are looking in Europe I would advise you to look into energy trading. I know first hand that a german energy giant is currently trying to establish their own quant division.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Yeah I know there are also firms in London. Mainland Europe doesn't seem to have many though.
            >energy trading
            Thanks, I'll look into that. I'm also willing to move abroad though.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            I can only recommend energy trading. The firms are all pretty big because the collateral requirements are very high.

  7. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I fricking hate the field.

  8. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Yes I know a guy there. No I won't dox myself or him by telling you the school we studied together in.

  9. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Seems like this is the right place to ask:

    What intresting trading strategies have you seen beyond quant trading. Think of boutique energy trading firms that use satalite data to determine the level of oil in oil terminals by deducting the roof height from shadows. To me it seems like this avenue is very 'creative' and exiting to delve in to so any literature or thoughs on this type of 'edge' creation is appriciated. So far ive only come to short stocks of companies that hire a disproportiate amount of women.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      If you have any kind ot edge in trading the good ol' 1st rule of Fight Club applies.

  10. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I know several people there. All autistic and brilliant programmers. Jane Street hires autists, puts them in a figurative room to work on their stuff, and pays them a frickload to keep them comfortable.

    They want people who will do what they are told. It's a quant company so they definitely don't want anyone that has an ethical problem with what they do.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      What ethical problems do quant firms have?

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        depends on your ethics

  11. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Will the financial sector end up developing its own DSL and gradually move away from C++?

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      no. they'll probably just move to Rust eventually since it's high level and easy to reason about eventually for new projects.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Is Rust really a complete alternative to C++ though? Especially for high performance applications?

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          sure? that's what I use it for.
          it's basically less moronic C++ as far as I'm concerned. only raw deal is making C++ bindings in rust. you tailor your choices based on what you need to get done. in some cases, using C++ is just the least path of resistance, but I wouldn't bother with C++ if you're greenfield as frick.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >I wouldn't bother with C++ if you're greenfield as frick.
            You mean C++ isn't worth learning anymore?

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            look. I have written a lot of C++, I have seen a lot of C++, I have dealt with weeks and weeks of cleaning up other people's C++ and educating users why their code is wrong or how to solve this "obscure linking error." You get fatigued by it, you see why all these things happen and then you look at rust, you know it isn't the silver bullet to end all of the world's problems, but you use it and you see that it actually is a pretty good ground floor for 95% of the frequently questioned answers that C++ forces on you.
            Yes, cargo isn't "ideal" but the build system MOSTLY JUST WORKS vs the complete dearth of poorly standardized build semantics of C++. I will take cargo over even the most well made cmake bullshit ever.
            most the other idiotic complaints about rust, build times, muh trannies, etc literally DO NOT MATTER in the real world. Your giant million loc C++ shit code base will be roughly as fricking slow to release build as rust and if you think otherwise, your devs are C++ gods or you're delusional.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            hmm I was thinking of learning cpp next but you're making me rethink that

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            learn it if you want. It's a useful skill to understand, but just know it's a miserable experience and the standards committee will make it worse going forward. C++11 was a step up, but still.

            plenty of jobs for C++ coders because virtually everything you interact with, directly or indirectly, is made in C++ (ironically NOT C). Rust is just a breath of fresh air. try it and see. You'll better appreciate it if you have C++ experience though, tbh.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >learn it if you want
            well it's not like python or js or whatever, learning cpp takes a huge amount of time, so it's a big investment to make.
            ideally I'd learn both but I'm looking at at least one full year of studying cpp during my free time if I want to be proficient

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            It's hard to tell whether Rust really is gaining traction and replacing C++ in industry, though. I mean yeah the troony memes and such don't matter in the real world, but as with any other tech, I'm waiting to see widespread adoption and job postings.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >job postings
            you ignore those anyway since they're always moronic and wrong.

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          no, not for HFT where nanoseconds matter
          optimised c++ is faster and produces cleaner ASM and will never be replaced by rust ultra low latency tasks

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >nanoseconds
            How do you learn to optimize that well
            Are there any resources that teach extremely low latency programming

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            yea git gud in physics/math/operations research/economics

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            All of those? Damn

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            low latency programming won't help you when you make economic losses

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            I get that, but I was just asking about the technical part of ultra low latency programming, not the financial implications.
            Operations research does sound like a very interesting field though.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            you dont need all that you just need 40 years experience programming fpgas lol

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >>How do you learn to optimize that well
            it starts with the learning the micro-structure of the exchange.

  12. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    OCaml sucks ass by the way

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      why

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        nta but the first thing that immediately turned me off on the whole lang was the header bullshit.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Why are there no popular functional languages?
      Don't fricking say JS

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        people are too dumb

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          Too dumb for what? What's so hard about functional programming? The only difficulty I ran into at first was learning to think recursively instead of reflexively using loops for everything, but that's not hard at all, just takes some practice

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            people are too stupid for this

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            If the majority of programmers are too dumb to learn recursion, how the frick does the tech field as a whole even keep standing

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Some people literally cannot do what you described. It's funny because the restrictions FP put onto you almost always makes things easier in the long run but people want the easy trivialities of imperative languages instead.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >Some people literally cannot do what you described
            Unironically have them read SICP.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            that's unironically way too hard for the majority of the population
            this is what you get when programming becomes popular

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >way too hard
            SICP is quite hard, that's true. Only larpers pretend otherwise. HTDP is an easier alternative.
            But honestly programming should just have a higher barrier to entry, someone who is incapable of understanding recursion has nothing to do in this field

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Barriers of entry are the only real solution to this. You can see year after year young people are getting less skilful on average. Books won't fix it. Many of them really are too dumb to think recursively. It's no wonder we have that godawful JavaScript woman who couldn't pass the fizzbuzz test. Of course functional programming can't become popular when everything will be gradually forced to cater to idiots.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            The JS woman was a designer who accidentally applied for a front-end dev job because the job posting was moronic. Her idea of what "technical skills" are is still moronic but the reason was she was so out of her depth was HR morons, not her choices.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            There are high barriers to entry in some sectors (finance, serious data science and AI, embedded to name a few) but it'd be better for the barrier to be at the university level rather than at the recruiter level, because this just makes the market more saturated

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Barriers of entry are the only real solution to this. You can see year after year young people are getting less skilful on average. Books won't fix it. Many of them really are too dumb to think recursively. It's no wonder we have that godawful JavaScript woman who couldn't pass the fizzbuzz test. Of course functional programming can't become popular when everything will be gradually forced to cater to idiots.

            Coding is a blue collar job. Coders think they are hot shit only because their on their diploma it's written ''engineer'', but the reality is that they are disposable and in direct conception to Poos working for 5 dollar a day.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            You cannot be a good programmer with an IQ below 130.
            95% of pajeets are incapable of writing code that actually compiles.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >most programming education is all about thinking imperatively using imperative languages, mutability as default and so on
        >those imperative langs are the status quo, with years/decades of backwards compatibility that make functional stuff a pain in the ass/inefficient
        >some of those don't even have static types, furthering the brain rot
        >most software design/architecture education is all about gut feelings and boomers parroting OOP
        >math and precise terms are le scary
        >most functional programmers don't know how to sell FP
        >the tooling/operations story of most FP langs is subpar or straight up dogshit, so harder to build and keep running something meaningful with them
        It's pretty easy to just say people are dumb, not that it doesn't play a part too, but that's basically saying some FP programmers are any smarter (they aren't)

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Baby duck moron detected

      Why are there no popular functional languages?
      Don't fricking say JS

      The low hanging fruit of FP features got integrated into corpolangs. Go look up C#'s linq, people use it more than for loops these days.

      people are too dumb

      You're not wrong lol

  13. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    can someone tell me why people want to get hired by them so bad? is it the pay? i dont understand.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >why do people want the best paying jobs in the world

      are you moronic??

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        i guess im moronic for not knowing how much quants are paid
        how much are they paid? why not just work at gayMAN anyway?

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          because even gayMAN that pays some moronic 300k salary to fresh grads is struggling to compete with prop shops/quant hedge funds

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          Because gayMAN doesn't pay the same performance based bonuses and career opportunities are not comparable provided you want to work in a non management position.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >career opportunities
            Can you elaborate?

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            You can progress in your career without having to become a middle manager and spending most of your time in unproductive meetings.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Their salaries don't seem particularly high
        https://www.glassdoor.com/Salary/Jane-Street-Software-Engineer-Salaries-E255549_D_KO12,29.htm

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          >glassdoor
          lmao

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >L3 less than L1

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            L3 gets more equity.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            huh, how does that work with a private company, how tf do you sell it?

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            There are different kinds of equity, moron.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Because you get paid extremely well, and compared to other places in that industry the culture seems relatively good.
      They also have excellent marketing. They market with problems a lot of the time, which attracts a lot of smart people who enjoy solving problems, and by having the OCaml thing and being the big IMO sponsor they have a very big image among math and CS nerds.
      Meanwhile their competitors like Citadel are notorious for being absolutely ruthless and basically abusing their staff like it's a fricking sweatshop.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        I think the most attractive quant fund is probably Rentec
        Also didn't Two Sigma have a similar reputation to JS?

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          rentec won't even bother to check your resume if you don't have a notable h-index. You better be the top of the top in math/physics/CS academic research

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            So it's the exception to

            Yes
            Friends work at JS, I work at a rival.
            There’s no screening for “target schools.” Nobody gives a frick about your degree. Your CV should display competence in either maths or CS depending on what you want to get in.

            This is probably the hardest way I know of to get in kek

            ?
            Why?

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            rentec ain't like the other prop shops, even literal nobel laureates have been rejected during rentec hiring process

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            What makes them so different is what I'm asking
            You don't need fields medalists to come up with novel trading strategies and innovative quantitative models

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            RenTech is the most secretive publically known firm in this field and no-one outside knows anything about what they do. The interview process probably has an NDA before they even start.

            What I do know:
            - Were the first to digitise historical financial data and use it (they copied interest rates out of books in libaries by hand), they invented the entire quant space.
            - ???
            - Uses option contracts to avoid taxes

            They have do have a site but it really doesn't give much apart from a database which grows by 40 terabytes per day.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >The interview process probably has an NDA
            The way you're describing it, it sounds like they're the most secretive publicly known company, period
            >a database which grows by 40 terabytes per day.
            What the frick, are they recording every financial transaction on a day to day basis or something?

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >What the frick, are they recording every financial transaction on a day to day basis or something?

            Yes, Likely on a tick basis then building minute/hour/day candles from that as needed. They probably also web scrape a lot.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Is there a reason why other quant firms can't do that?

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >Is there a reason why other quant firms can't do that?
            You also need the people who know what to do with the data + 40 years of predecessor knowledge

            I do not know what they do and neither does anyone else.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            That's pretty fascinating. Too bad we'll likely never know.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >>Yes, Likely on a tick basis then building minute/hour/day candles from that as needed.
            They don't buy the data directly from nasdq or nyse?

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            When I said web scraping I also meant other kind of information that you can buy.

            Everyone has price data, if you start including data, such as payments made with visa/mastercard you may gain an edge to buy/sell visa/matercard by figuring out their revenues before they announce them

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            You can add:
            >rip off your low-tier inverstors in benefit of inner circle
            to your list.

            They are good, but not as good as their magical reputation says.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Why do people keep saying this

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Because that's how sausage is made. Of course they are very good in what they do, but no fricking way they got some "secret sauce" in 2024 that others don't.

            https://www.institutionalinvestor.com/article/2bswms7wco7as686o8ikg/portfolio/renaissances-medallion-fund-surged-76-in-2020-but-funds-open-to-outsiders-tanked

            https://www.reuters.com/business/finance/renaissance-executives-pay-about-7-bln-settle-tax-probe-wsj-2021-09-02/

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            There's no plausible way they'd do this on such a large scale without being caught. At least based on that article, the explanation does make sense if the holding times of the outsider funds are long.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            rentech's medallion fund (the one with 62% annualised returns) hasnt accepted outside investments since 1993, all their aum is owned by employees and their family members
            the equity fund which is open to investors and is a seperate entity that has like 1% of the AUM of medallion fund
            jane street, two sigma, etc all the "prop shops" dont take any investor money, its all just growing their pile

            this guy

            You can add:
            >rip off your low-tier inverstors in benefit of inner circle
            to your list.

            They are good, but not as good as their magical reputation says.

            Because that's how sausage is made. Of course they are very good in what they do, but no fricking way they got some "secret sauce" in 2024 that others don't.

            https://www.institutionalinvestor.com/article/2bswms7wco7as686o8ikg/portfolio/renaissances-medallion-fund-surged-76-in-2020-but-funds-open-to-outsiders-tanked

            https://www.reuters.com/business/finance/renaissance-executives-pay-about-7-bln-settle-tax-probe-wsj-2021-09-02/

            is a total moron

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Well, it should make you think even a bit how their inner circle just prints money when outside investors barely make even. How can they make a bank for themselves but not for their clients?

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            The article you link tells you those two funds use completely different strategies.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Exactly, why they do so? One with above room temp IQ would ask why can't both funds do similar things

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Because the same strategy doesn't work at different scales. If as

            rentech's medallion fund (the one with 62% annualised returns) hasnt accepted outside investments since 1993, all their aum is owned by employees and their family members
            the equity fund which is open to investors and is a seperate entity that has like 1% of the AUM of medallion fund
            jane street, two sigma, etc all the "prop shops" dont take any investor money, its all just growing their pile

            this guy [...] [...] is a total moron

            says the size of Medallion is about 100x bigger then that requires a fundamentally different strategy to be used for it.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >muh scale and flying under the radar
            That would make a plausibe explanation if Medallion was 1/100th of the outsider fund but other way round? Frick no.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Completely wrong. Why are you convinced you’ve got it all figured out when you don’t even know the basics of how it works?

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            It’s not about “flying under the radar.” It’s because certain strategies literally only work with the right amounts of capital.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            if youre referring to rentech, like I said, the medallion fund and the renaissance international equity fund (RIEF) are two totally seperate entities with seperate strategies
            nobody know precisely what strategies medallion uses but its all algorithmic and I assume they do all kinds of arbitrage, some really advanced statistical arbitrage, high frequency arb, etc
            medallion is involved in basically every market that exists, both securities and commodities
            RIEF is a long short portfolio of only equity and is structured like a traditional hedge fund

            Exactly, why they do so? One with above room temp IQ would ask why can't both funds do similar things

            >One with above room temp IQ
            oh my god the fricking irony
            arbitrage strategies have diminishing returns as you put more money into them (for obvious reasons, if your IQ is above room temp)
            they are inherently not scalable, a balance needs to be struck between AUM and ROI
            if they were to accept investor money their returns would like collapse to near the industry average for hedge funds

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            He's right though. Rentec is a meme and you're a delusional moron. Their other fund front runs their other funds.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            How do you plan to do that and not get caught? Also, why did Medallion do so well even in years both funds did very well, which are the majority of years?

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            is front-running illegal?

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >What makes them so different is what I'm asking
            they literally created the entire industry
            they also have extremely little discretionary trading, it's almost 100% algorithmic

  14. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    What does it take to start your own algo trading shop?

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      money

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        figures

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >minimum of 130 IQ, lacking math skills can be subdued with good computer skills and vice versa
      >an empty calendar and a bank account to keep you fed for the foreseeable future
      >a niche market where you can beat all the big boys

      That's it.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >me

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          Sadly no.

  15. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Why wouldn't they use a language that's fast to develop in like Python?

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      They do use python, for prototyping
      When it comes to implementing the models so that they actually run fast, they use C++ which is the standard for anything performance-critical in 99% of cases regardless of the industry (the remaining 1% being extremely niche, outlier cases where langs like Forth etc may be used)

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        You sound like a larper pulling shit out of your ass

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          Cope

  16. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Finance companies are gay
    Let's say I give you infinite money.
    Do you still care about modeling finance? Frick no.
    Other jobs exist that are cooler and you still make bank.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >Do you still care about modeling finance?
      yes actually I find it very stimulating and interesting
      ideally for me it would be a fun way to retire early then spend the rest of my days being a NEET aristocrat

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      ykou're on IQfy, nobody cares about quants here
      hft infra is among the most interesting things you can work on these days
      gayMAN has nothing that compares to chasing microseconds for jane street or citadel

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        This. I don't understand people who say "people are into quant finance just for the money, it's boring shit". It sounds like extremely interesting and stimulating work. I already work in data science and statistical modeling though so maybe I'm biased

  17. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Not me but I did get a recruiter offering me a fast track to getting interviewed by them. Not gonna do it since it's not fully WFH.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Do you go to MIT or CMU or something?

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >CMU
        maybe...

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          damnnn, my odds of transferring there from CC is abysmal, probably 5%. its hopeless and so over man.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            pro tip: if SCS is outta the question try for CIT's ECE major instead. you can take a shit ton of CS courses and effectively get the same education if you play your cards right with course selection.

            note that I did graduate a while back so shit may have changed since then

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            thanks I appreciate it, it's all a crapshoot but it doesnt hurt to try at least. However I do genuinely have a deeper desire of computer engineering rather than computer science in terms of passion, I do all ki ds of low-level shit and I barely touch the abstracted stuff by my own will if it isnt necessary. Maybe I should do CE instead of CS.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            just game the system and get internships and research positions ASAP, yes CC students can get that shit too but be ready to cold-email 1000 professors and apply to 10,000 internships. It is bound to happen.

  18. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I love that logo

  19. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I'm 26 and will be starting my MSc in 2025. Is it too late for me to get into this field, do they only want guys in their early twenties?

  20. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I thought JS only hired former math Olympiads. Some anons are telling porky pies

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      If that were true they’d have almost no staff. It’s more like people who did Olympiads are overrepresented in these firms but they’re by no means the only hires or even the majority.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      not true. there are tons of myths surrounding jane street, most moronic. jane street has eveb started recruiting senior engineers from other companies that have been out of college for a while.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Nah, they just get a lot of them because they sponsor the IMO and a lot of other math olympiads too. You can literally see the Jane Street logo in the corner of some olympiad papers, so they have a lot of presence in those circles
      t. olympiad dork

  21. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    i don't get the allure of HFTs. there are tons of successful small businesses started by uneducated hicks that generate revenue in the millions and are much easier to start than getting into an HFT that pays significantly less.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      The work itself is stimulating. Not everything is about money...

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        If you're in the field, is there any demands for open source solutions to any of the problems you're having? I've thought about this for a while and this thread just reminded me of it, I was wondering if I could create libraries for SWEs in finance but... I don't know what you guys would want. I know it sounds moronic, I have the passion but I dont even know know what to implement. Could you give me some ideas?

  22. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    How do I get a job at RenTech? I'm currently studying for a PhD in mathematics at a T10 school. Am I on the right track? I would kill to be able to invest in the Medallion Fund

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >How do I get a job at RenTech?
      Become a tenured professor at a T10 school, publish some papers, get a fields medal if possible, then maybe you'll have a shot

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >medallion fund
      crypto gives better returns

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >How do i get a job at rentec
      >studying for a PhD
      too late, should have been putnam fellow in your freshman year

  23. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >Is it really a lottery every time or is there a formula?
    Yes, ignore the copes from people telling you you need muh PhD at muh Top 1% university or some shit.

  24. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Knew a guy in my undergrad CS course who got an internship at Jane Street. Dude was obviously exceptionally bright when it came to LeetCode-style puzzles in a way that some jeet who grinds them out all day could never be, but he definitely wasn't the smartest person I'd ever met. Probably helped that this happened in Australia, where I suspect there's a less competitive application process?

    I doubt there's anyone reading this thread who's smart enough to get in, but I'll still advise against applying regardless. From what I've heard, the work culture at these fintech firms is just comically toxic and competitive. Think the TV show 'Industry' but with mostly smug chinks and the occasional autistic white dude.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      for the amount they pay, i could care less what the work culture is like

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Oh I agree; I would endure atrocious conditions for the kind of salary a company like Jane Street pays. But for us, getting into a company like Jane Street would be like winning the lottery. The people they actually hire aren't scraping by in the interviews. They know just how smart they are, and how much they're worth in the current job market. When you've got options like those people, you'd be more willing to take a small pay cut for a better work environment.

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          Can any quants in here calculate the chances of a community college student getting an internship at Jane Street? Is it between 0.001% and 0.000001%?

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            have you at the very least taken linear algebra, multivariate calculus, ODEs, PDEs, statistics/probability and have personal achievements that involve fairly sophisticated mathematics/statistics?

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >calculate
            The chance is near zero unless you are a woman, part of a minority and or a troon. Considering what site we're on, I'd say you have a chance.

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          >you'd be more willing to take a small pay cut for a better work environment.
          yeah that happens as you get older
          a lot of people burn out and retire at a gayman after 30 or 40
          t. work at gayman full of ex-quants

          This. I don't understand people who say "people are into quant finance just for the money, it's boring shit". It sounds like extremely interesting and stimulating work. I already work in data science and statistical modeling though so maybe I'm biased

          >I don't understand people who say "people are into quant finance just for the money, it's boring shit".
          most modern cs grads are in it for the money

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Most modern cs grads can't write a recursive function. Who cares what they're in it for, they'll end up as low tier web monkeys threatened by pajeet outsourcing either way.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            i'm talking about the interns at my company, many of which successfully did get into a finance firm before graduation

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >Who cares what they're in it for, they'll end up as low tier web monkeys threatened by pajeet outsourcing either way.
            /twg/ summarized in one sentence

  25. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    maybe a dumb question but whatever- do you guys who work at js or the like just use similar algorithms you see/develop at work at home? that's the only way i'd see any of this being worth it, at least financially.
    if you're that much of an overachiever, full of puss and vinegar, and primarily care about money i would think it would be more lucrative and easier to just work your way up the c-suite at whatever company and/or hop around jobs going up the ladder

  26. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I work at a quant fund currently but as a dev. What would it take to move to a quant trader position? I have a BS in CS.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Why don't you ask the quants at your firm?

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Don’t get a lot of opportunities to, unfortunately. Also most of them are math grads.They’ll probably just tell me to study math.
        For dev, I can advise prospective applicants to really get good at C++, Python and leetcode and obtain stellar grades. Having good experience with asynchronous and multi-threaded programming is a major plus.

  27. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >east coast
    >finance
    if you're not from an ivy league you might as well throw your resume in the shredder
    east coast companies are notorious for their nepotism, especially the finance ones

  28. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    does it matter from where you got your master's

  29. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    they sponsor MIT mystery hunt
    other puzzle hunts too

  30. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    This is their puzzle page

    https://www.janestreet.com/puzzles/current-puzzle/

    I guess if you can consistently solve their puzzles, they will interview you.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >leddit space

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous
    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >Why Puzzles
      >What’s a company like Jane Street doing with a page about puzzles? The act of solving puzzles, though that might seem abstract, is intrinsic to the work we do at Jane Street.
      >Only by identifying new problems in the financial markets and figuring out (potentially novel) ways to solve them can Jane Street continue to thrive. Even though we have established strategies, we’re humble enough to know that if we have a good idea, others may soon have it as well. Prime among the skills necessary to stay successful, then, is creative problem solving, or puzzling.
      >Number puzzles, logic puzzles, puzzles with and without clear answers, puzzles with and without clearly defined rules — these are all part of day-to-day life at Jane Street, which is why we’ve chosen to devote this section of our website to puzzles. Plus, solving puzzles just feels great.
      >One last thing — this is a puzzle!

      >>One last thing — this is a puzzle!
      w-what? I'm being filtered already...

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Bros... What the frick

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        you must think like professor layton

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        someone please explain this

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          >Why Puzzles
          >What’s a company like Jane Street doing with a page about puzzles? The act of solving puzzles, though that might seem abstract, is intrinsic to the work we do at Jane Street.
          >Only by identifying new problems in the financial markets and figuring out (potentially novel) ways to solve them can Jane Street continue to thrive. Even though we have established strategies, we’re humble enough to know that if we have a good idea, others may soon have it as well. Prime among the skills necessary to stay successful, then, is creative problem solving, or puzzling.
          >Number puzzles, logic puzzles, puzzles with and without clear answers, puzzles with and without clearly defined rules — these are all part of day-to-day life at Jane Street, which is why we’ve chosen to devote this section of our website to puzzles. Plus, solving puzzles just feels great.
          >One last thing — this is a puzzle!

          >>One last thing — this is a puzzle!
          w-what? I'm being filtered already...

          Bros... What the frick

          it's a lame puzzle

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            haaaaah. -1

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            thank god, i thought it was actually hard.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            heh I'm jane street material it seems

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >https://www.janestreet.com/puzzles/current-puzzle/
      >See the example, below.
      >example is above
      morons.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        fricking owned, never write to me again Lamestreet

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