Druids

who were the druids?
what did they do?
where are they now?

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  1. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    They were pagans.
    They worshipped false gods.
    And now they're in hell.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      which gods?

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      >And now they're in hell
      Kelts used iron chariots, they're fine.

  2. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    I read somewhere that the ONLY historical knowledge of the Druids that we have is 1 single sentence in 1 single book, written by Julius Cesar after they were conquered/genocided.
    Makes me wonder WTF did the druids do that was so threatening that they were not only removed from the Earth but also removed from history.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      They where the educatex/priest class of gaul, so obviously the romans would go after them to solidify theyre rule. Since they did not write anything down(form of control via monopolizing knowledge) the end of their priesthood also meant the end of their historical legacy.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      >I read somewhere that the ONLY historical knowledge of the Druids that we have is 1 single sentence in 1 single book, written by Julius Cesar after they were conquered/genocided.
      This isn't correct.

      Anyways the Druids (the term "druid" is a compound directly cognate with the English "true wit") were ritual specialists and knowledge bearers in Ancient Celtic society. It's not entirely clear when they came about, but they were around sometime circa the 600sBC onwards. The best way to think of them is as Celtic Brahmins. They weren't poets, however, that was the class of filidh. They were basically priests. It's not entirely clear if the position was heredity (like brahminhood) or something that you joined. You had to be trained, which included knowledge of ancient languages, memorizing lore, ritual knowledge, and sacral initiation. However, up until the 600sAD Gallic noblemen and clergy were claiming descent from druids to demonstrate how cool they were. They moved amongst the stone-walled cities of the Celtic world; we know that they tended to the sacred temple-groves of the Celtic world but we don't know if individual druids were attached to them or not.

      They wielded immense power in their society and their social class was the crux of opposition to Roman rule. The big tl;dr of Roman geopolitics concerning Gaul is that Gaul's cities were incredibly productive in both agriculture and iron goods (the Celts basically invented ironworking). As far back as the 500sBC the Celts were exporting high quality iron goods to Greece, ranging from swords to broaches to surgical tools.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        How were these goods paid for? With gold. This caused a trade imbalance as the Celts would pile up the gold and this would screw the Romans on trade. The Romans didn't like Celtic hegemony, the Celts didn't like Roman hegemony, they fought, Caesar ended up committing treason and waging illegal wars to defeat several powerful Celtic cities when the time was right. The Druids were the crux of resistance to Roman incursion, so they were obliterated.

        We know that they were literate in their own tongue (we actually have writing in Gaulish), and we know that they could read and write in Greek, but we are told that they didn't commit their sacred beliefs to writing. This is surely initiatory knowledge as the Roman state was actively patronizing Gaulish religion up until Constantine made Judaism and Christianity the state religions of Rome. One of their secretive beliefs was some kind of schema concerning reincarnation.

        In Ireland the Druids ended up converting to Christianity more or less willingly and ended up creating their own semi-separate Abrahamic religion ("Celtic Christianity"). Technically, Irish Druidry only ended in the 1700s with the Flight of the Earls (Celtic Christianity held that St. Patrick and Jesus were both Druids and that Jesus was the Celtic Messiah, not the israeli Messiah). We have a lot of knowledge of Irish Mythology as such (they came up with a "second Old Testament" in the form of baptized Celtic Mythological cycles).

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        > Gallic noblemen and clergy were claiming descent from druids to demonstrate how cool they were.

        Do you have examples?

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous
        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          Lady With A Mead cup, pg. 188. It doesn't cite where the author gets this claim from, however.

          [...]
          yesssssssssss thankyou, this is the info i was after, can you recommend any good books about the druids with all this info you've mentioned?

          Lady With A Mead Cup. It starts out about Germanics but it eventually starts talking about Celts (tl;dr the book is about a social structure in Germanic society that was of Celtic origin).

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      thought i made a reply to this thread but i can't see it now ? druids must have taken it.
      There's a lot more than one account although most are Roman. Druids wrote nothing down.

      >I read somewhere that the ONLY historical knowledge of the Druids that we have is 1 single sentence in 1 single book, written by Julius Cesar after they were conquered/genocided.
      This isn't correct.

      Anyways the Druids (the term "druid" is a compound directly cognate with the English "true wit") were ritual specialists and knowledge bearers in Ancient Celtic society. It's not entirely clear when they came about, but they were around sometime circa the 600sBC onwards. The best way to think of them is as Celtic Brahmins. They weren't poets, however, that was the class of filidh. They were basically priests. It's not entirely clear if the position was heredity (like brahminhood) or something that you joined. You had to be trained, which included knowledge of ancient languages, memorizing lore, ritual knowledge, and sacral initiation. However, up until the 600sAD Gallic noblemen and clergy were claiming descent from druids to demonstrate how cool they were. They moved amongst the stone-walled cities of the Celtic world; we know that they tended to the sacred temple-groves of the Celtic world but we don't know if individual druids were attached to them or not.

      They wielded immense power in their society and their social class was the crux of opposition to Roman rule. The big tl;dr of Roman geopolitics concerning Gaul is that Gaul's cities were incredibly productive in both agriculture and iron goods (the Celts basically invented ironworking). As far back as the 500sBC the Celts were exporting high quality iron goods to Greece, ranging from swords to broaches to surgical tools.

      How were these goods paid for? With gold. This caused a trade imbalance as the Celts would pile up the gold and this would screw the Romans on trade. The Romans didn't like Celtic hegemony, the Celts didn't like Roman hegemony, they fought, Caesar ended up committing treason and waging illegal wars to defeat several powerful Celtic cities when the time was right. The Druids were the crux of resistance to Roman incursion, so they were obliterated.

      We know that they were literate in their own tongue (we actually have writing in Gaulish), and we know that they could read and write in Greek, but we are told that they didn't commit their sacred beliefs to writing. This is surely initiatory knowledge as the Roman state was actively patronizing Gaulish religion up until Constantine made Judaism and Christianity the state religions of Rome. One of their secretive beliefs was some kind of schema concerning reincarnation.

      In Ireland the Druids ended up converting to Christianity more or less willingly and ended up creating their own semi-separate Abrahamic religion ("Celtic Christianity"). Technically, Irish Druidry only ended in the 1700s with the Flight of the Earls (Celtic Christianity held that St. Patrick and Jesus were both Druids and that Jesus was the Celtic Messiah, not the israeli Messiah). We have a lot of knowledge of Irish Mythology as such (they came up with a "second Old Testament" in the form of baptized Celtic Mythological cycles).

      speaking of swords and broaches, some of those roman accounts say they were horsemen and warriors. many people think of them as mystical bards, but it seems to me they were more like philosopher kings. thoughts? is that accurate?
      In the UK the last pagan king, penda, was said not to care about christianity, but rather was only bothered by hypocrites; people who did not follow thier own god's instructions.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        >many people think of them as mystical bards, but it seems to me they were more like philosopher kings.
        The archetypal druid was not a bard or a poet because bards and poets (filidh) were a separate social class. Having said that, we know from the Irish example that here was significant overlap (as in, you could be both a filidh and a druid, you just had to study both separately). There were seven ranks of filidh in Irish society, and "bard" actually comes from the term for the lowest (and most common) rank. By contrast, the archpoet of Ireland had to memorize over 80 epic cycles and recite them without a single error in one sitting for a crowd of assembled elite-poets.

        The druids were definitely philosophers (the oldest Greek descriptions of them literally use the term "philosopher" to describe them), but I hesitate to say that they were kings in the conventional sense. They weren't warlords, but rather religious specialists, mediation brokers, bureaucrats, and judicial officials. To put it in modern terms, they were "the government" of Celtic society and thus handled all matters except those of the military, economy, and media. In the Platonic sense, yes they were absolutely "Philosopher Kings".

        The Three Estates directly comes out of (Christianized) Celto-Germanic society so an ideal way to look at it would be like this: imagine Feudal Europe, with kings and peasants, and the clergy are a decentralized class of wandering priests rather than an institutionalized brotherhood with men assigned to specific locales.

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          Now there IS some confusion here because TODAY, in the MODERN PERIOD, the term "druid" is used as an Anglicization to refer to members of a complex network of Celtic Language Revivalists. The most popular Welsh one of these is the Gorsedd Cymru. This is really a sort of revival of the filidh class of Celtic society (the professional poets), and as such they are not at all druids. Having said that, the term ("druid") has been used to refer to such men since the beginning of the Celtic Revival (which really starts with the end of Gaelic Ireland). Likewise, by the time of the actual end of Gaelic Ireland the term "druid" had just meant "esteemed wise man", and was used to refer to Jesus and Christian Saints, so its eventual usage of "Celtic dude how knows stuff" is just the modern iteration of a continuous process that traces back to the 600sBC. The PIE don't seem to have had a single "priest class" but instead a wide array of technical sacral specialists, so even the idea of a "druid" as a single person who unites all forms of sacral knowledge into one body is itself an innovation towards this.

          Modern Celtic Language Revival institutions are entirely secular, although they often have whacky and romantic rituals. The earliest neopagan roots of these organizations were based on actual historical Celtic Polytheistic ritualisms (or rather what was known at the time), but the next generation were more Christian and just made a bunch of stuff up that was supposed to be ancient Christian """"""""tradition"""""""" but was really just complete bunk.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            >many people think of them as mystical bards, but it seems to me they were more like philosopher kings.
            The archetypal druid was not a bard or a poet because bards and poets (filidh) were a separate social class. Having said that, we know from the Irish example that here was significant overlap (as in, you could be both a filidh and a druid, you just had to study both separately). There were seven ranks of filidh in Irish society, and "bard" actually comes from the term for the lowest (and most common) rank. By contrast, the archpoet of Ireland had to memorize over 80 epic cycles and recite them without a single error in one sitting for a crowd of assembled elite-poets.

            The druids were definitely philosophers (the oldest Greek descriptions of them literally use the term "philosopher" to describe them), but I hesitate to say that they were kings in the conventional sense. They weren't warlords, but rather religious specialists, mediation brokers, bureaucrats, and judicial officials. To put it in modern terms, they were "the government" of Celtic society and thus handled all matters except those of the military, economy, and media. In the Platonic sense, yes they were absolutely "Philosopher Kings".

            The Three Estates directly comes out of (Christianized) Celto-Germanic society so an ideal way to look at it would be like this: imagine Feudal Europe, with kings and peasants, and the clergy are a decentralized class of wandering priests rather than an institutionalized brotherhood with men assigned to specific locales.

            yesssssssssss thankyou, this is the info i was after, can you recommend any good books about the druids with all this info you've mentioned?

  3. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >who were the druids?
    >what did they do?
    No one knows
    >where are they now?
    And what would they say to us...if they were here....tonight

  4. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Sounds like a mystery to me.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      >who were the druids?
      >what did they do?
      No one knows
      >where are they now?
      And what would they say to us...if they were here....tonight

      you fricking morons hahahaha
      anyway real info: they retreated to Anglesey when the romans invaded and the gualish druids were said to have learnt thier stuff from british druids.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Did you take my scissors?

  5. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >who were the druids?
    A social class within Celtic society. A hereditary caste of priests/shamans that enjoyed a respected, elite social role seems most likely, from what little we know of them.
    >what did they do?
    All manner of things most likely. The typical spiritual services associated with shamans is a given (conducting rituals for good harvests, funeral rites, divination etc), but they also likely functioned as local healers, advisors to clan chiefs and magistrates/arbiters.
    >where are they now?
    That is like asking were the eunuchs of imperial China or samurai of shogunate Japan are now. They are all long dead. The society they existed in is long gone and thus anyone associated with the unique social roles of that society is long gone also.

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