>Europe was the location of the first civillisation

>Europe was the location of the first civillisation

>In 4500 bc, before the first cities were built in Mesopotamia and Egypt, Old Europe was among the most sophisticated and technologically advanced places in the world ... At its peak, about 5000–3500 bc, Old Europe was developing many of the political, technological, and ideological signs of "civilization". Some Old European villages grew to citylike sizes, larger than the earliest cities of Mesopotamia ... Old European metalsmiths were, in their day, among the most advanced metal artisans in the world, and certainly the most active. The metal artifacts recovered by archaeologists from Old Europe total about 4,700 kilograms (more than five tons) of copper, and over 6 kilograms (13.2 pounds) of gold, more metal by far than has been found in any other part of the ancient world dated before 3500 bc. The demand for copper, gold, Aegean shells, and other valuables created networks of negotiation that reached hundreds of kilometers. Pottery, figurines, and even houses were decorated with striking designs. Female "goddess" figurines, found in almost every settlement, have triggered intense debates about the ritual and political power of women. Signs inscribed on clay suggest a system of primitive notation, if not writing.

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  1. 5 months ago
    Anonymous

    >Europe was the location of the first (proto) writing system

    >The Vinča symbols or Vinča–Turdaș signs are a set of untranslated symbols found on Neolithic era artifacts from the Vinča culture and related "Old European" cultures of Central Europe and Southeastern Europe. Whether this is one of the earliest writing systems or simply symbols of some sort is disputed. They have sometimes been described as an example of "pre-writing" or "proto-writing". The symbols went out of use around 3,500 BC. These findings are important because the bulk of the Vinča symbols were created between 4,500 and 4,000 BC, with the symbols on the Tărtăria clay tablets possibly dating back to around 5,300 BC (controversially dated by association). This means that the Vinča finds predate the proto-Sumerian pictographic script from Uruk (modern Iraq), which is usually considered to be the oldest known writing system, by more than a thousand years. Analyses of the symbols showed that they have little similarity with Near Eastern writing, resulting in the opinion that these symbols and the Sumerian script probably arose independently.

  2. 5 months ago
    Anonymous

    >Indo-Europeans were the first to enter the Iron age

    >The earliest tentative evidence for iron-making is a small number of iron fragments with the appropriate amounts of carbon admixture found in the Proto-Hittite layers at Kaman-Kalehöyük in modern-day Turkey, dated to 2200–2000 BC. Akanuma (2008) concludes that "The combination of carbon dating, archaeological context, and archaeometallurgical examination indicates that it is likely that the use of ironware made of steel had already begun in the third millennium BC in Central Anatolia".

    • 5 months ago
      Anonymous

      Where are you quoting from? I'd like to read it.

      • 5 months ago
        Anonymous

        https://books.google.com.au/books?id=gFEARIQ6zYoC&redir_esc=y

        https://www.degruyter.com/document/doi/10.1515/kadm.1999.38.1-2.114/html

        http://www.jiaa-kaman.org/pdfs/aas_17/AAS_17_Akanuma_H_pp_313_320.pdf

        these are just a few sources, theres a multitude of evidence for this. I'd also recommend looking into Harald Haarmann's work.

        Meanwhile, in reality, these are images based on archeological digs on what settlements of the two looked like at the time.

        Egypt had cities of over 200,000 people when the largest settlements in Europe were a fraction of the size and way less developed.

        All you did was look up "neolithic europe" and stich it next to a picture of Ancient Egypt. This is new evidence to suggest neolithic Europe was far more advance. Here's a more accurate recreation of Danubian culture town. The reason why little structures are left is likely because they built out of wood.

    • 5 months ago
      Anonymous

      Genetically BA/ChL Anatolians

      It is important for any ancient civilization to have been noted by at least one other ancient civilization. Unfortunately, with the European first civilizations, this is not the case. A 19th Century author is right at saying that until the Greeks and the Romans, all European nations, the Celts and the Slavs, and the Illyrians and the Thraks, although civilized, built civilizations of 2nd order, or passive civilizations, building houses and having an economy was their sole and most autistic concern. There were no monuments, no interaction with other civilizations, rarely wars, and definetly nothing worth of note.
      [...]
      This.

      Tbqh several neolithic euro cultures have monumental megalithic architecture and waged specialized warfare on eachother while innovating economy, ecosystem, transportation, metallurgy and other stuff. They were indeed advanced but didn't have the rise of let's say Assyrians or Egyptians. The only people to achieve this were the Minoans

  3. 5 months ago
    Anonymous

    >and this is why it is unfair that I can’t have sex

    • 5 months ago
      Anonymous

      I have a hot 18 year old Greek girlfriend

      • 5 months ago
        Anonymous

        Convert to Orthodoxy.

  4. 5 months ago
    Anonymous

    On the back of the snake you can go from Denmark to the Black Sea, the Med, Nile and West Nile. The horse and boat people like to move around, because they can.

  5. 5 months ago
    Anonymous

    Meanwhile, in reality, these are images based on archeological digs on what settlements of the two looked like at the time.

    Egypt had cities of over 200,000 people when the largest settlements in Europe were a fraction of the size and way less developed.

    • 5 months ago
      Anonymous

      Lmao
      Imagine believing that egypt looked like that

    • 5 months ago
      Anonymous

      Less grain in the north. Early Egypt used metals from mines far away in Europe. It's reasonable to assume the traditions of smithing likely come from somewhere closer to those old mines. Egypt is special for its geological stability and stable, mild climate, ideal to preserve ancient structures.
      The coastline around the Black Sea has changed drastically and when you go further north or west things get even more unstable. If there were other population centers like the banks of the Nile there's no reason to assume they were preserved like in Egypt. The Egyptians understood this according the scholar that supposedly told Plato about Atlantis. He says the reason they still have their monuments is that everywhere else has been ravaged by disasters over and over.

  6. 5 months ago
    Anonymous

    yeah but those cities were built by shitskin immigrants

  7. 5 months ago
    Anonymous

    >no writing system
    nothing civilized then

    • 5 months ago
      Anonymous
  8. 5 months ago
    Anonymous

    Unfortunately for the Euroboos this is not true.

    • 5 months ago
      Anonymous

      It literally is though

      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Old_Europe_(archaeology)#cite_note-5

      • 5 months ago
        Anonymous

        It is important for any ancient civilization to have been noted by at least one other ancient civilization. Unfortunately, with the European first civilizations, this is not the case. A 19th Century author is right at saying that until the Greeks and the Romans, all European nations, the Celts and the Slavs, and the Illyrians and the Thraks, although civilized, built civilizations of 2nd order, or passive civilizations, building houses and having an economy was their sole and most autistic concern. There were no monuments, no interaction with other civilizations, rarely wars, and definetly nothing worth of note.

        Often these ideas are rooted in insecurity but the cold truth seems more flattering to certain groups than any of these attempts at romantic, wishful thinking can come up with.

        This.

        • 5 months ago
          Anonymous

          the neolithic civilizations OP is talking about predate writing so they couldn't have been recorded by other civilizations.

    • 5 months ago
      Anonymous

      Often these ideas are rooted in insecurity but the cold truth seems more flattering to certain groups than any of these attempts at romantic, wishful thinking can come up with.

  9. 5 months ago
    Anonymous

    >Old Europe was among the most sophisticated and technologically advanced places in the world
    Shame the Proto Indo Europeans ravaged and vandalised them huh

  10. 5 months ago
    Anonymous

    >4-5k years ago
    Ötzi had all kinds of tech on him. Nebra sky disc, Stonehenge and the oldest pyramid are supposedly all from this time. Also the first expansion into the Pacific islands by boats. Tribal migrations like Caesar responded to and led to him taking Gaul were probably the norm.
    Ötzi was G, a Cromagnon with a wide face like Sardinians. The Indo-European is taller, less wide, more adapted for swimming.
    G seems to be a minority. Epigravettian (R1b) boatmen apparently mostly replaced Magdalenian (I) snowmen in Europe 12-14k years ago.

  11. 5 months ago
    Anonymous

    >Female "goddess" figurines
    Huh? Those are mainly from hunter gatherers and we have genetic evidence that the neolithic farmers were patrilocal and had stratified societies. Opposite of matriarchy. Greeks had female goddesses, were they feminists?
    Btw civilization begins somewhere in Anatolia in 9000-8000 bce or so, then it is transferred to europe via neolithic farmer colonizations

    Pic unrelated of course

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