Explain to me how this can dox me

Explain to me how this can dox me

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  1. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    It tells your MAC address to where people can order pizzas.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >order pizzas
      MAC address is for ordering hamburgers

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      jokes on you, I use a pc

  2. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Enough bits to point to a single pube on your scrotchum.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >going to trawler in 2024
      >not wasting time at the deep sea fishing hub while watching nostalgia critic videos
      NGMI

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >watching youtube men
        That's very fricking gay.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >wasting your time playing an mmorpg
        ngmi

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      What game is that?

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Oldschool.runescape

  3. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    With IPv4, you might be behind a NAT firewall so your public IP would only identify your ISP or company. With IPv6 the address space is large enough to assign a public IP to every computer in the world. So it becomes trivial to uniquely track you, albeit anonymously. A hacker can target your computer directly, possibly obtaining your real world identity that way. And law enforcement can get your identity a little bit easier, though that's already pretty easy.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >With IPv6 the address space is large enough to assign a public IP to every computer in the world.
      but you're still behind a nat on ipv6, you fricking Black person. you can assign an ip address to every grain of sand on earth and it makes nothing easier. Black person.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        You don't know what NAT is.

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          you barely understand how the internet works, Black person.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            ok moron

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          No he's right. ipv6 isn't special. Your router gets an ipv6 address just like it has a unique ipv4 address already in first world countries. I guess ipv6 might be a little bit spooky to people in third world countries who are used to behind cgnat but that's it.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Yes, but a packet originating from your IP address does not appear to originate from your router's IP address. I mean, you COULD still use NAT but there's no reason to so most networks probably won't.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Visit https://whatismyipaddress.com/ on both your computer and phone, or on any two devices connected to the same wifi network.
            You'll probably notice that they show the same IPv4 address, but different IPv6 addresses. This, speaking very roughly, is the privacy concern with IPv6.
            Assuming a residential setting, given an IPv4 address, the most you can usually do is identify a household and increasingly you can't even necessarily do that. Meanwhile an IPv6 address can fairly reliably identify not only a household but a specific device within that household.

            With IPv4, you might be behind a NAT firewall so your public IP would only identify your ISP or company. With IPv6 the address space is large enough to assign a public IP to every computer in the world. So it becomes trivial to uniquely track you, albeit anonymously. A hacker can target your computer directly, possibly obtaining your real world identity that way. And law enforcement can get your identity a little bit easier, though that's already pretty easy.

            Didn't the IPv6 address also contain ISP information? As in, your country and location within that country can be read from the address?

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Same as ipv4. No more accurate.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            That's equally true for v4 and v6.
            (Although "location within country" is usually WILDLY inaccurate for me, probably due to ISPs using point-to-point tunnelling. Country and ISP are always correct though.)

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >With IPv4, you might be behind a NAT firewall
      Nat is not a firewall.

      >So it becomes trivial to uniquely track you, albeit anonymously. A hacker can target your computer directly, possibly obtaining your real world identity that way.
      IPv6 addresses are unique per machine and are not static, they change all the time.

      >With IPv6 the address space is large enough to assign a public IP to every computer in the world.
      but you're still behind a nat on ipv6, you fricking Black person. you can assign an ip address to every grain of sand on earth and it makes nothing easier. Black person.

      Wrong, NAT does not exist in IPv6.
      Your ISP assign a static subnet (usually it ranges from a /48 to a /64) and your devices use that subnet as the first part of their IPs.
      You can achieve the same thing in IPv4, if you get assigned a static /24 subnet you could give a globally routable IPv4 to each of your devices up to 254 (on a /24) on your network.
      NAT was invented only because the number of available IP addresses was running out very quickly.

      Visit https://whatismyipaddress.com/ on both your computer and phone, or on any two devices connected to the same wifi network.
      You'll probably notice that they show the same IPv4 address, but different IPv6 addresses. This, speaking very roughly, is the privacy concern with IPv6.
      Assuming a residential setting, given an IPv4 address, the most you can usually do is identify a household and increasingly you can't even necessarily do that. Meanwhile an IPv6 address can fairly reliably identify not only a household but a specific device within that household.

      The «privacy concern» was the use of Mac address in the second half of the IPv6, potentially letting the site owners know the model of your device.
      This was solved with the privacy extension in RFC4941 which is enabled by default.

      is ipv6 even usable? i mean every application, game, website expects you to use ipv4. you can't put an ipv6 address in old multiplayer games, or is there a way?

      Yes, you can use IPv6-only packets on your LAN and use 464XLAT and NAT64 to connect to legacy IPv4 addresses, you still need a dual-stack connection though.

      If your connection supports ipv6 then actually you're probably using it quite often, many major services do support it.
      If you mean "is an ipv6-ONLY connection usable" then no, there's too much stuff that's still v4-only. It'll likely be many years until you can turn off v4 without breaking at least a few things you need.
      If you really needed to play an ipv4-only game over an ipv6-only connection, you could find a way. It'd involve setting up a tunnelling system at both ends and would be a massive pain if you aren't both experienced with networking.

      Get with the times old man.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >NAT does not exist in IPv6
        It's not standardized but it has been implemented by several vendors. Sure it goes against IETF's idyllic vision for IPv6 but clearly enough of these vendor's customers clamored for support that it materialized.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >The «privacy concern» was the use of Mac address
        >This was solved with the privacy extension
        It helps but I don't consider the problem solved. It fundamentally gives a service you're connecting to a much more precise identifier than it would get from an IPv4 behind (possibly CG-)NAT. I can imagine scenarios where this could matter (services A and B are compromised and you access them both on the same day, with ipv6 the attacker can verify it was the same device vs just same household with non-cg v4 or same ISP with cg v4)

  4. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    your ISP will assign you a static IP instead of giving you an IP that might be you sometimes but might be given to someone else later

  5. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Can someone explain how this is more secure than segmentation?

  6. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Visit https://whatismyipaddress.com/ on both your computer and phone, or on any two devices connected to the same wifi network.
    You'll probably notice that they show the same IPv4 address, but different IPv6 addresses. This, speaking very roughly, is the privacy concern with IPv6.
    Assuming a residential setting, given an IPv4 address, the most you can usually do is identify a household and increasingly you can't even necessarily do that. Meanwhile an IPv6 address can fairly reliably identify not only a household but a specific device within that household.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      is empirical evidence for

      Yes, but a packet originating from your IP address does not appear to originate from your router's IP address. I mean, you COULD still use NAT but there's no reason to so most networks probably won't.

      .

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >https://whatismyipaddress.com

  7. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    is ipv6 even usable? i mean every application, game, website expects you to use ipv4. you can't put an ipv6 address in old multiplayer games, or is there a way?

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      If your connection supports ipv6 then actually you're probably using it quite often, many major services do support it.
      If you mean "is an ipv6-ONLY connection usable" then no, there's too much stuff that's still v4-only. It'll likely be many years until you can turn off v4 without breaking at least a few things you need.
      If you really needed to play an ipv4-only game over an ipv6-only connection, you could find a way. It'd involve setting up a tunnelling system at both ends and would be a massive pain if you aren't both experienced with networking.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >With IPv4, you might be behind a NAT firewall
        Nat is not a firewall.

        >So it becomes trivial to uniquely track you, albeit anonymously. A hacker can target your computer directly, possibly obtaining your real world identity that way.
        IPv6 addresses are unique per machine and are not static, they change all the time.

        [...]
        Wrong, NAT does not exist in IPv6.
        Your ISP assign a static subnet (usually it ranges from a /48 to a /64) and your devices use that subnet as the first part of their IPs.
        You can achieve the same thing in IPv4, if you get assigned a static /24 subnet you could give a globally routable IPv4 to each of your devices up to 254 (on a /24) on your network.
        NAT was invented only because the number of available IP addresses was running out very quickly.

        [...]
        The «privacy concern» was the use of Mac address in the second half of the IPv6, potentially letting the site owners know the model of your device.
        This was solved with the privacy extension in RFC4941 which is enabled by default.

        [...]
        Yes, you can use IPv6-only packets on your LAN and use 464XLAT and NAT64 to connect to legacy IPv4 addresses, you still need a dual-stack connection though.

        [...]
        Get with the times old man.

        >you still need a dual-stack connection though.
        so ipv4 will have to coexist for the foreseeable future, no way we can switch to ipv6-only networking within the next couple of decades at least

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          Some ISPs already do IPv6-only and manage IPv4 on their end so customers don't have to.
          They do it with 464XLAT or with a lower level approach like MAP-E/MAP-T.

          >no way we can switch to ipv6-only networking within the next couple of decades at least
          China said that the want to phase out IPv4 by 2030.
          The US department of defence wants majority of their networks on IPv6-only by the end of 2025 (only 20 % of federal networks will still use IPv4-only or dual-stack).
          Look into Sunset4, it's a goal from the internet engineering task force to shutdown IPv4 from the public internet, it is currently on pause because IPv6 still struggles to get adopted.

          >NAT does not exist in IPv6
          It's not standardized but it has been implemented by several vendors. Sure it goes against IETF's idyllic vision for IPv6 but clearly enough of these vendor's customers clamored for support that it materialized.

          Following non-standards will surely work out, right anon?

          >The «privacy concern» was the use of Mac address
          >This was solved with the privacy extension
          It helps but I don't consider the problem solved. It fundamentally gives a service you're connecting to a much more precise identifier than it would get from an IPv4 behind (possibly CG-)NAT. I can imagine scenarios where this could matter (services A and B are compromised and you access them both on the same day, with ipv6 the attacker can verify it was the same device vs just same household with non-cg v4 or same ISP with cg v4)

          If you assume that two services are compromised, that is not really the fault of IPv6, but of the their webmasters.
          This scenario can also be applied to IPv4 with CGNAT, you still sign in with a user account, the criminal has info of that anyway, even if you use a VPN or Tor.
          Compromised services means that your data is already in the hands of criminals, why would they care about your IP? They already have what they wanted.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            But why do they want to shutdown IPv4? Just to make it even easier to track people and what they do?

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            The internet was built on the principle of end-to-end connectivity.
            Things like NAT, CGNAT, dynamic IPs bastardise this concept.
            IPv6 solves these issues and more, like more addresses available or simpler route logic.
            IPv4 has ~4 billion addresses, on earth there are ~5.5 billion internet users.
            In contrast, IPv6 has ~340 undecillion addresses.

            thanks for the info, with networking there seems to be a huge amount of things to know and you don't really get to see things unless you work for an isp or something

            The funny thing is the way that IPv6 works under the hood is much simpler and quicker than IPv4. Some sysadmins are mainly against it because addresses are a bit longer and they use hex instead of decimal, oh and they hate to change things because they are lazy.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            thanks for the info, with networking there seems to be a huge amount of things to know and you don't really get to see things unless you work for an isp or something

  8. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Under IPv6 the need to randomizing IPs disappears.
    You ISP can just assign you a certain IP, because each ISP could have enough IPs to assign every person on the planet.

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