Faust reading group

Going to start a reading group for Goethe’s Faust in a week. This is a preliminary thread to discuss editions, pace and so on.

Please chime in if you want to join. Threads will be posted weekly

IQfy poetry discord if you are interested, group is in the Goethe channel: https://discord.gg/DEzynczm

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  1. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I keep forgetting what faustian means and everytime I'm like oh .. when the dictionary says it's relating or resembling faust

  2. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Sounds like a kino story, but it's written in verse...? And the original language is German.. (I speak only English and Italian)

    Reading the translated version of poetry sounds like a bad idea.
    Is there a prose version? Or maybe the translation's good enough?

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      I’m personally reading the Atkins translation which is pretty literal. The translator justifies choosing being literal over trying to write equivalent poetry by citing this is how Goethe approached translating Shakespeare to German. Most other translations, even prose translations, are not literal, so you might want to compare for what you enjoy most

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        I might be asking too much, but do you know where I could find samples for the various translations?

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          Go on library genesis and download various different translation of it yourself.

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          Atkins

          >Deign, O Deign,
          >you who are peerless,
          >you who are radiant,
          >to look down on my joy—
          >the love of my youth,
          >no longer unhappy,
          >has now returned!

          Other translations of the same passage

          https://scholarsarchive.byu.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1306&context=dlls

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Atkins...
            Hell naw

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            He’s much less lose and more memorable if you compare enough passages

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      John R. Williams
      https://www.euppublishing.com/doi/10.3366/tal.2011.0011

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Bayard Taylor

  3. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous
  4. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Goethe's Faust is about the ineffable restless striving of the Western spirit; that which begets the Infinity of Multiplicity. It is Western man striving for the unconditioned, the Absolute, and the transcendent. It is about the metaphysical thing-in-itself achieved through Western science and philosophy. In it you can find an allegory for science and philosophy. It is also about the insatiable greed for knowledge and power inherent in that metaphysical striving. It references the whole Western tradition in its pages. In it you can find hints to Plato's allegory of the cave (Western mankind seeking to step out of the cave of ignorance) and the dialectical unconscious of Being and Non-being represented by Mephistopheles in his subsumption of the ultimate telos of Western history. Moreover, it expresses the empryreal heights of Western enlightenment values and the ultimate goal of Western initiation and philosophical enlightenment.

    In it you find the values of the egoistic creative-nothing of Max Stirner and the Absolute overcoming of Western mankind's strictures and limitations. It is about attaining the metaphysical heights and the marriage of heaven and hell. It is about pushing the metaphysical frontier and the frontier of consciousness. Faust is about the self-activity of geist and consciousness; it is the world-soul expressed through the Faustian aristocratic individual. It is beyond the comprehension of your average smutty soul seen from your disgusting ugly image. It takes the unconditioned iteration of western consciousness to the freedom of the unconscious infinity of Western dominance to truly understand its underlying themes. It is the fusion of matter and spirit, subject and object, self and community. It is the unconditioned self-activity of soul. It is nature subdued. Nature overcome and nature mastered. It is at once a celebration of life and existence and a celebration of the European miracle.

    You will find allegorical references to Schelling, Plato, Fichte, Hegel and Kant and other German thinkers. It is the Platonic ideal realized through the absolution of Spirit.

    Also its about beer.

  5. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Any good German translations?

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Goethe is my favourite

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Any good German translations?

        Lol.
        Lmao.

  6. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I read the first part and half of the second. Might participate for deeper reading. Looking forward to this!

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Bird in the store. Guard!

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        hippity hop
        I'm coming for your slop

  7. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    There is truth in memes.

  8. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I would be interested in conversation, but I am reluctant to use Discord. I know the schizo types around here who will dig into someone's personal life, and I have no intention of allowing that to happen. Faust is my favorite work of all time, with particular attention to Part 2, but it is not worth being outed as someone who browses this godforsaken website.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      he said that there will be threads here. Also op delete your faust discord channel and force the troonycord people to post in these threads instead

  9. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >Before us Germans lies an equally uncomprehended artwork [as Antique Tragedy and Shakespeare], a riddle still unsolved, in Goethe's Faust. It is manifest, as I have already insisted, that we possess in this work the most consequent outcome of the original German Play: if we compare it with the greatest creations of any nation, those of Shakespeare not excepted, it reveals an idiosyncrasy exclusively its own, ranking it for the present as theatrically-speaking impracticable, for simple reason that the German Stage itself has shamefully made away the originality of its own development. Only when this shall have been recovered, when we possess a Theatre, a stage and actors who can set this Germanest of all dramas completely properly before us, will our aesthetic Criticism also be able to rightly judge this work: whereas to-day the coryphaei of that Criticism presume to crack bad jokes and parodies upon its second part. We then shall perceive that no stage-piece in the world has such a scenic force and directness (Anschaulichkeit) to shew, as precisely this maligned (no matter what the pose adopted!) and un-understood second half of the tragedy. And this work, which roots in the plastic spirit of the German Theatre as ne'er another, had to be written by the poet in the air: the only signs by which he could fix its type, or the "example" as I have called it, were rhyming metres taken chiefly from the rugged art of our old folk-poet, Hans Sachs. Yet if we want a witness to the supreme ideality whose germ lay lurking in the homeliest element of the German Folk, awaiting its development by a faithful chosen spirit, we have only to regard this wonder-building raised by Goethe on that so-called knittel-verse [doggerel]: he seems to never quit this basis of the most completely Popular, and yet he soars above it to the highest art of antique Metrics, filling link upon link with fresh inventions of a freedom unknown to the Greeks themselves, from smiles to grief, the wildest bluntness to the tenderest sublimity. And these verses, in a tongue the truest to our German nature, our actors cannot even speak!
    - Wagner's Actors and Singers 1872

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