Favorite Iliad character?

For me, it's Nestor.

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  1. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Was Paris the Rhaegar or Greek mythology?

  2. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Why do Japs and Greeks drink their alcohol the same way?

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      They wuz really chinese niggga

  3. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Hector

  4. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    There's barely any 'character' to any of them.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Nestor was the original “old guy past his prime who agrees to go along with the plan with his old gang for one last war.” Sorta like a heist movie character but in Greece.

  5. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    1. Achilles
    2. Apollo
    3. Diomedes

  6. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Ajax (and Ajax), I love the the small-giant dynamic as they help each other in sections of the story, Telamonian Ajax in particular pretty much carries the achaeons while the tide was against them after everyone else was wounded in some way or another
    also
    >was the one who actually struck hector into a daze after zeus was tricked by hera
    >his huge fricking tower shield blocking every arrow and onslaught as his company attempts to drag away patroclus' corpse
    Yeah, I'm thinking he's based.

  7. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Hector.
    All the Greeks came across as overly proud, warmongering c**ts. The Trojans seemed like genuienly decent people, bar Paris.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Hey, Paris isn't THAT bad. He was pulling his weight in the second half of the battle.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        [...]
        Paris is the goat.

        Paris is a great character, I meant he wasn't as honourable as the other Trojans.

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          Honor is synonymous with stupidity.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            I disagree. Especially in regards to the norse sagas, where honor generally is about taking the path of most resistance. It can even work as a determination to fight against evil or bad characters and this works best in the sagas which, unlike the Iliad, are written in a very neutral tone, (except when it comes to saint Olaf, who is always the greatest human to have ever lived and who will ever live, at least according to some of the saga authors). Plus, the poems are better imo. Sure, you might think it's stupid, but the reasons you can give are not any more or less logical as they all have to work on some presupposition that you assume to be correct. You'd have to define stupidity first before you call something stupid.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Honor in the true sense of the word is a societal control mechanism. Those who follow it are idiots.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            PRINCE HENRY
            Why, thou owest God a death.

            FALSTAFF
            ‘Tis not due yet; I would be loath to pay him before
            his day. What need I be so forward with him that
            calls not on me? Well, ’tis no matter; honour pricks
            me on. Yea, but how if honour prick me off when I
            come on? how then? Can honour set to a leg? no: or
            an arm? no: or take away the grief of a wound? no.
            Honour hath no skill in surgery, then? no. What is
            honour? a word. What is in that word honour? what
            is that honour? air. A trim reckoning! Who hath it?
            he that died o’ Wednesday. Doth he feel it? no.
            Doth he hear it? no. ‘Tis insensible, then. Yea,
            to the dead. But will it not live with the living?
            no. Why? detraction will not suffer it. Therefore
            I’ll none of it. Honour is a mere scutcheon: and so
            ends my catechism.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >Honour is a mere scutcheon: and so ends my catechism.
            Shield against shame.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            from Falstaff?-- a character who never viewed his shortcomings as sources of shame or embarrassment, but sources of empathy

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            But he's fat. Compulsive eating comes from buried shame - all addiction actually.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Because it’s affirmative, isn’t it? I think gluttony must be a good deal less deadly than some of the other sins - at least it celebrates some of the good things of life.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            What is he ashamed of though? That's the question.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            common humanity precludes mention of any psychological reading into Shakespeare.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Falstaff is beloved precisely because of how pathetic he is. He is harmless - his psychology primitive and unsophisticated. A child.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            So one would presume that he's ashamed of being so weak and thus why he eats himself to death. He's afraid of death and yet eats his way there - the ultimate irony and self-sabotage.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            he died of a broken heart

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Not quite. He's the only great character in dramatic literature who is also good (Auden likened him to a Christ figure). He's a Christmas tree decorated with vices. The tree itself is total innocence and love.

            Shakespeare must have understood Falstaff better than any other characters he created, because Falstaff was obliged to sing for his supper - that was a character filled with imperfections, physical and moral defects (but the essential part of his nature is his goodness).

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >The tree itself is total innocence and love.
            Like a child.

            >Shakespeare must have understood Falstaff better than any other characters he created, because Falstaff was obliged to sing for his supper - that was a character filled with imperfections, physical and moral defects (but the essential part of his nature is his goodness).
            It's arrested development - not goodness. You are transvaluating the word.

            he died of a broken heart

            I.e. heart attack from his obesity.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Innocent is what Falstaff is.
            further, you could say he is Merrie England. He is a kind of refugee from that world. And he has to live by his wits; it’s a rough modern world that he’s living in.

            Shakespeare was greatly preoccupied with the loss of innocence. There has always been an older England, which was sweeter, purer, where the weather was always springtime and the daffodils blew in the warm breezes. You feel a nostalgia for it in Chaucer, and you feel it all through Shakespeare.

            >I.e. heart attack
            from betrayal of friendship

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            It never existed. The chwistmas twee is as fake as santi claus.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            but exists in the heart of all English poetry.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Innocent is what Falstaff is.
            further, you could say he is Merrie England. He is a kind of refugee from that world. And he has to live by his wits; it’s a rough modern world that he’s living in.

            Shakespeare was greatly preoccupied with the loss of innocence. There has always been an older England, which was sweeter, purer, where the weather was always springtime and the daffodils blew in the warm breezes. You feel a nostalgia for it in Chaucer, and you feel it all through Shakespeare.

            >I.e. heart attack
            from betrayal of friendship

            Just another example of Agamemnon bustling up and (almost always) doing the wrong thing.
            Like in Book 2, when Agamemnon calls an assembly and tests the troops' morale by offering to abandon the siege. But he so over-acts his defeatist part that he convinces even himself, and the war-weary soldiers rush cheering down to the ships -- Athene is obliged to intervene.

            Lovely Falstaff posts, they have brightened my day considerably. And they seem to carry an insight that only another rotund and bibulous fellow could summon, hmm... but anyway, the figure of Falstaff dovetails very nicely with my recent reading, so my thoughts are in the right place to appreciate him. I truly hardly ever cry reading something, it's just not immediate enough as a medium I guess - but Falstaff's "death" at the end of part one drew a couple tears from me.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous
          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >wary
            Ah, poor lad of one-and-twenty

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            tis true tis true

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >Honour is a mere scutcheon: and so ends my catechism.
            Shield against shame.

            Plato says that the honor culture is the timocracy, then developing into the oligarchy in which honor lies with money alone, then democracy in which honor disappears completely, then tyranny in which order is regained through brute force.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            no doubt from the Five Ages of Man myth.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            I don't think so, it comes rather from the mystery schools.

            Because Greece had so many different islands with differing regimes the traveller could observe the stages of the political systems. Sparta is the timocracy, Athens the debauched democracy etc. The islands with tyrants were always hated the most and I suppose Plato observed or was told so by the mystery school elders that tyrannies always developed out of democracies.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        He had a pretty good arc tbh. Went from getting utterly buck broken by menelus to sharpshooting big time with his bow, even if a lot of his most notable shots were hitmarkers

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          He is also credited with killing Achilleus even though that’s not in the Iliad proper.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Hey, Paris isn't THAT bad. He was pulling his weight in the second half of the battle.

      Paris is the goat.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >"NOOO DEIPHOBUS HELP M-ACK!"

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Hektor's pride is kinda what killed him at least as far as his own arc and frame of reference, ignoring the signs, thinking the gods were going to permanently be on his side

  8. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    None. I don't respect morons who fight over prostitutes.

  9. 3 weeks ago
    ࿇ C Œ M G E N V S ࿇

    ME IDENTIFICO CON «HEKTOR».

  10. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Thersites, the only guy who talks any sense at all in the entire book.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      the ultimate lesson of the Iliad is that it doesn't matter if you're right if also ugly and annoying.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >ugly and annoying

        Add to this, poor and you are correct.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      One could read it from a modern, Marxian angle that the entire story of Troy is an example of how monarchy is an inherently fragile system when the monarchs are all pompous and the war itself came about over their opposing claims to Helen, representing Troy’s fertile planes.

      Thersites may have been correct about the monarchial system and about the rulers who were abusing their power but Homer is giving you an ancient defense of the system from antiquity - it doesn’t matter how pompous the kings are when they are still the ones in charge. The system permits Agamemnon to steal Briseis and it is perfectly within his realm to do so. The Greeks would have realized this when hearing the poem recited. Thersites is seemingly correct but the flaws within the system are only a weakness to it.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        One could read any number of things from a "Marxian" angle. But one would be wrong in doing so, making your comment superfluous.

        Still, you are contrasting (stupid, mistaken, honor-based) ancient and (correct, rational, why should I care about that b***h) modern sensibilities, which is the real point. This guy

        None. I don't respect morons who fight over prostitutes.

        for example, has genuine understanding. But the real reason why Odysseus checks Thersites is because talking out of turn and if we we go home in the fast trim ships then we don't have our movie. Conveniently, the character's author makes him out to be quite ugly, a Quasimodo type.

        Hector is one of the best characters in all of literature. Ajax/Aias is cool too.

        The one scene thus far where Hector seems human/admirable is when he's back on Troy's walls with the wife and baby, and the baby is scared of daddy in the scary mask and the couple laugh with each other. But then I'm only part way through and haven't finished the thing yet. It's honestly so dull that I've completely stalled out on it over the last few weeks. I think the last bit I read was Hera seducing Zeus, thus and buying time. Honestly I was surprised that Zeus fell for it, he knows what a calculating wench his sister is. At any rate it's a dull book, something to be forced through only because of its unavoidable meme status. Like the bible in this regard.

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          >It's honestly so dull
          I felt the same initially, but it does gather momentum the more you stick with it. The first few chapters are the most unforgiving. There are a string of amazing moments that make it all worthwhile. I think it partially hinges on which translation you're reading.

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          But you could legitimately make a point from Marxian analysis that the Iliad is unintentionally about the flaws of the monarchy system even if that isn’t what Homer the poet is attempting to have you take away. That is what my comment on Thersites is about.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            You cannot legitimately make any sort of point about anything, at all, from a "Marxian analysis". Not even in principle. It isn't necessary to invoke him to make the banal and obvious observation that elites can be dicks.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >One could read it from a modern, Marxian angle that the entire story of Troy is an example of how monarchy is an inherently fragile system when the monarchs are all pompous and the war itself came about over their opposing claims to Helen, representing Troy’s fertile planes.
        Genuinely curious but how on earth does the Iliad represent monarchy as a "fragile" system. Hell, what even counts in your subjective eyes as a "fragile" system and what makes the monarchy more fragile than, say, modern mass democracy?

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          Capitalism= the workers are alienated from their own labor by the bourgeois
          Monarchy= the soldiers are alienated from their own labor by the monarchs

          The monarchs are all at each other’s throats though none of them did anything not under their jurisdiction.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Of course the dysgenic modern surplus human will say this.

      One could read any number of things from a "Marxian" angle. But one would be wrong in doing so, making your comment superfluous.

      Still, you are contrasting (stupid, mistaken, honor-based) ancient and (correct, rational, why should I care about that b***h) modern sensibilities, which is the real point. This guy [...] for example, has genuine understanding. But the real reason why Odysseus checks Thersites is because talking out of turn and if we we go home in the fast trim ships then we don't have our movie. Conveniently, the character's author makes him out to be quite ugly, a Quasimodo type.

      [...]

      The one scene thus far where Hector seems human/admirable is when he's back on Troy's walls with the wife and baby, and the baby is scared of daddy in the scary mask and the couple laugh with each other. But then I'm only part way through and haven't finished the thing yet. It's honestly so dull that I've completely stalled out on it over the last few weeks. I think the last bit I read was Hera seducing Zeus, thus and buying time. Honestly I was surprised that Zeus fell for it, he knows what a calculating wench his sister is. At any rate it's a dull book, something to be forced through only because of its unavoidable meme status. Like the bible in this regard.

      Literal woman.

  11. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Hector is one of the best characters in all of literature. Ajax/Aias is cool too.

  12. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Ajax, I love how both in the Iliad and Odyssey Homer doesn't fail to remember the audience how only Achilles was prettier and stronger

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Then why not Achilles?

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Achilles comes off as too god-like and him having a goddess(in fact, two) basically do his bidding kinda makes him less impressive than Ajax, I like the simple, raw character of the latter as bulwark of the army, nearly killing Hektor, saving the ships, being instrumental in recovering the body of Patroklos, etc..,, all without a god explicitly on his side

  13. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    is that the sword from fate zero

  14. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Agamemnon did nothing wrong. He had every right to take Briseis away.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      No he didn't, Achilles claimed that piece of ass himself as his own spoils. Agamemnon acts like a spoilt brat, which is ironic because up until that point it's Achhille's who's the whiney brat. Then Agamemnon had to go with his tail between his legs when he realised he couldn't win the war without the man who he disgraced in front of the whole Greek army.
      The Greeks were actually some of the worst people in the whole story. Even the gods showed more decency than all of them.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        They're kind of like the Chinese.

  15. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    For me, it's Diomedes.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Easily Hector. He is without doubt the most complex and interesting character Homer ever wrote.

      Frick that b***h. Hes OP as frick and only because Athena turbo simped for him. The only cool Greeks were big Ajax and Odysseus. The rest were just greedy and annoying gays

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >The rest were just greedy and annoying gays
        Except Diomedes, of course.

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          Diomedes was the worst of them. Literally made invincible by Athena and still ran like a broken buck from Hector. He deserved so much more than an arrow to the foot from that fop Paris

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Didn't he wound Ares and sent him crying back home like a baby? I haven't read the Illiad in like 15 years.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            They're all a bunch of boring fungible guys so it is quite easy to lose track of who's doing what from moment to moment. So much so, that I can't even understand the above dislike of Diomedes relative to Hector. They both get (rhyming) god-tier power-ups and Hector overplays his hand a bit when they charge the Argive shoreline trench.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >fungible

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            It was Aphrodite he wounded. She was trying to protect a Trojan warrior whose leg Diomedes crushed with a boulder he heaved with his OP as frick Athena strength

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Yeah she asked for it, women don't belong on the battlefield.

  16. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Which are the straight ones and which are the gays? I think they're all gays except for Hector and Paris.

  17. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Hector, there's a reason he was one of the nine worthies. If everybody tried to emulate him the world would be a better place

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Paris is better.

  18. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    1. Hector
    2. Hector
    3. Hector
    4. The river god who tossed that b***h Achilles around like a ragdoll
    5. Hector

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      That would be Scamander. His name is Scamander

      There is actually a relatively humorous joke from Socrates in Cratylus where he quotes the Iliad and says “Homer says the men call this river deity Scamander so clearly that means women must have a different name for him.” That was actually decently amusing and the interlocutor rolls with it.

  19. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Diomedes. Been a while since I've read it but doesn't he fight with Ares himself at one point? That's badass.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >gets wounded by diomedes with athena driving his spear
      >teleports back to olympus to whine to zeus about how a mortal hurt him
      >zeus just laughs and calls him a b***h
      Ares was cucked for most of the book, it's great.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >Gets gutted
        >screams with the force of ten thousand men
        >DAD DAD LOOK WHAT ATHENA DID
        >"Aries... you are my least favorite child."

  20. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Science did pic rel; though a bit part, nonetheless the causus belli and therefore my fave:
    No Helen, no feats of arms, no city sacked, no Homer, no Plato b***hing, no Roman mythical history, no Virgil, no West..
    On your knees, boys

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      she's cute, but i dunno if i'd spend nine years trying to sack Troy for her.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Agreed, but if tops relative to what was then available, who knows what any (of us) would have done, especially given that the occupational options back then (for a non-pleb) were pretty much farm, fish, or fight.

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          war definitely seems like the worst option compared to farming and fishing.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Well, yeah, but I imagine after awhile it could get a little boring

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Helen was blonde

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Hey, man-- you're going to take that one up with 'science'
        I'm just taking what they're giving

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Wrong. She’s traditionally depicted as red haired in medieval artwork.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Teucros because I prefer the archer class and melee is fricked with all the gods just randomly intervening and slapping people around.

        I don't remember her hair color being mentioned anywhere in the Iliad, hot women just have "beautiful locks" usually. The only things mentioned as blond are Achilles, Menelaus, a river and a horse. Also the sea is wine colored, as are some people's eyes.

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          Menelaus is given red hair in both Lattimore and gayles’ translations.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      the the dyke israeliteess from tlou2 you lying shit.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        She's Italian.

  21. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Diomedes. Also, the most complete warrior after Achiles.

  22. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Paris. The scene in book 3 where he goes back to the chamber after Menelaos rekt him and fricks Helen is super hot.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Stole his wife, inadvertently killed his homosexual brother Hector, killed Achilles, destroyed Troy, founded Rome.

  23. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    That one lad called Dolon. He's literally the only character who is specifically described as ugly and dysgenic while everyone else is some heroic gigachad. He gets given a mission, fails and gets tortured to death. F.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Sounds like a big moron, no wonder he was ugly.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      I wonder how they tortured him... do you think he was stripped naked

  24. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I’m on chapter/book 19, so almost done…
    So far my list in no particular order would be:
    • Diomedes - resembles a “traditional main hero” we are accustomed to with modern storytelling
    • Menelaus - pretty similar to Diomedes although the whole war is about his wife so it makes sense for him to be fierce and menacing. He leads his men well, and exhibits many characteristics of a great leader
    • Ajax the Greater, Ajax the Lesser, Patroclus, Odysseus - Men of great honor and loyalty. Homer really emphasizes aspects, i.e. Ajax is fierce and large, Odysseus is wise, Patroclus is loyal
    • Nestor - the original “wise old man” trope. I like that Homer goes out of his way to explain how he was once a young man fierce in warfare, but is now an old king who can only offer his mind
    • Glaucus - probably the only one on the Trojan side who I admire. He’s not the “foil” to someone like Diomedes by any means, but he’s certainly the “Ilian Noble Warrior”
    • Meriones & Idomeneus - side characters by all accounts, but sprinkled throughout the whole book. Quick to volunteer at any call-to-arms, always at the front lines of fierce battle. These two have a very “Merry and Pippin”-esque side story in book 13 that made me smile.
    • Homer - the narrator himself! The similes are interesting and shed light onto the life of a Greek in the 8th century BC. Also his little quips make me audibly lol when I read. For example, when Homer says something like “It was brave to try. But they were foolish!”

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      (me)
      Alright I have to add Hector I think. I’m reluctant to (I kind of see him as the main ‘villain’) but he did chew out Paris so he obviously has sense. Yet he honorably defends his homeland so you cannot fault him for that. And he rallies his men no matter the circumstance, so he gets recognition for being a great leader. Oh and add on the fact that the Achaeans are a much more unified army contrasted with that of Hector’s; his Trojan allies don’t even speak the same language, yet he still manages them efficiently.

      Telemann Ajax hefted a giant ass rock and sent Hector spinning like a top, almost killing him. He deserved that shit hahah.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >Odysseus
      >great honor and loyalty

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        unless I’m missing something, then yes he is. I haven’t read The Odyssey (yet), if that’s what you’re referring to?

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          Depends on what you mean by honor.

          He was the guy who killed a bunch of helpless warriors while they were sleeping and came up with the idea of the horse to deceive the Troyans and get into the city.

          He also killed his servants when he got back because they weren't sad enough that he hadn't returned yet but that's a different story.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >He was the guy who killed a bunch of helpless warriors while they were sleeping
            I thought that was Diomedes and Telemonian Ajax? Maybe Odysseus was with them; I should have annotated my book in hindsight.
            >and came up with the idea of the horse to deceive the Troyans and get into the city.
            Oh. Lol. I haven’t gotten there yet. I plan on finishing the book either today or tomorrow.
            >He also killed his servants when he got back because they weren't sad enough
            Damn.
            Yeah I suppose I meant “honor” very vaguely. In that he is simply a great / well-respected man who risks his life for the Greek cause. But I see your point of view

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Forgot the Trojan he and Diomedes intercepted on their nightly raid. Odysseus promised to spare his life in exchange for information and then he just let Diomedes slit his throat.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Odysseus is not known for being honest.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            He got his head chopped off all a sudden while he was still blabbering

  25. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    If your favorite character isn't either Diomedes or Hector, you're a certified moron.

  26. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Zeus, the mighty god himself

  27. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I only know Achilles was an butthole, what a dick.

    I'm reading The Aeneid right now and unsurprisingly Achilles' son is also a huge dick.

    Diomedes was the only Greek guy worthy of respect, the rest were a bunch of bandits.

  28. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Nestor was Homer's favourite butt (after Agamemnon). Nestor consistently gives bad advice which Agamemnon always adopts (whereas Polydamas consistently gives good advice, which Hector always rejects)

  29. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Achilles’ Shield.
    This damn inanimate piece of metal is more fleshed-out than any “character” Homer gave a shit to describe

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >is emblazoned with the images of a town in peace and a town in a state of war representing the duality of man

      Whoa….

  30. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    1)Hector
    2)Diomedes
    3)Odysseus

  31. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    That one soldier whose name i forgot, he is one of the few "unimportant characters" in the book, if you guys remember please tell me.

  32. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Menelaus comes pretty well out of the story. Conscious that this bloody war is being fought to avenge the wrong which Paris did him, he shows common sense and dignity, keeping up a steady average of kills in various battles, even on one occasion decided to spare a suppliant prince (who Agamemnon officiously murders).

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      You got the wrong message from that bit. Menelaus sparing the prince is supposed to be like he is forgetting why they are even there and Agamemnon has to kick him back into gear and say “look. They wouldn’t spare us so we shouldn’t spare then when push comes to shove.” That bit is showing Menelaus as a sentimental type same as he is a lover who fought at Troy for his dignity and woman.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Just another example of Agamemnon bustling up and (almost always) doing the wrong thing.
        Like in Book 2, when Agamemnon calls an assembly and tests the troops' morale by offering to abandon the siege. But he so over-acts his defeatist part that he convinces even himself, and the war-weary soldiers rush cheering down to the ships -- Athene is obliged to intervene.

  33. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    for me it's Orestes

    >has mommy issues
    >vindicated by Athena
    >reason behind Western law systems
    >inspired Dune

  34. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Big fan of the ajaxs.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous
  35. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I want Nestor to fall down a flight of stairs and spend three days dying in his own shit and piss. He’s just a tedious and self-centered old man who insists on being listened to. Every time he wags his finger at the other Achaeans, I wanna frick his geriatric mouth shut and cut his throat just before I cum.

    The answer is Hector

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      For me, it’s the bit where he cajoles Achilles with presents from Agamemnon but he leaves out the part about Agamemnon using this as a backhanded way to submit to him.

  36. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Diomedes is pretty cool since he straight up attacked an Olympian god and pretty much got away with it, while Ajax and Odysseus got screwed over for just talking shit to them

  37. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Just finished the Iliad; I’m reading Virgil’s Aeneid next. Is it really just larp fanfic or does it stand out as its own distinct piece of art?

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