>filtered by calculus I

>filtered by calculus I
Is there any hope for me or should I just rope at this point?

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  1. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    It depends on how many decibels you are being filtered by. Do you have any attenuation value you can provide us?

  2. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    You have to be mentally disabled if you can't get thruogh calc 1

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      I can do most of the problems that involve just using a formula to find the answer, but anything that's a word problem where you're supposed to figure out how to apply calculus to solve some real world problem I have no clue where to even begin.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Yeah this was my problem. The hard part isnt the calculus, its the algebra and trig and having to apply everything from earlier courses into manipulating equations. It just takes practice tbh, solving lots of problems is the best way to get a feel for it.

        I take it you're having problem with optimization and related rates problems? At core its just implicit differentiation but you gotta know the exact way to set up the problems. Idk the only way is just spam them until you start to recognize it. Or for problems about particles just remember simple rules. Derivative of position function is velocity, derivative of velocity is acceleration, and going back the opposite way taking the antiderivatives. For changing directions you just gotta find zeros of first and 2nd derivitive use critical points or whatever for concavity.

        Its important to clarify if you're actually having difficulty with calc concepts or just the actual algebra and trig to find the answer to the problems

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >I have no clue where to even begin.
        by figuring out what's x (number that you choose and put in) and what's y or f(x) (number that you calculate with x as input because it's for some reason interesting), then doing the calculus

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        To be fair, that problem still exists. In my grad courses the hardest part was always figuring out what the frick the problem was even asking. It was never the math itself.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        I refuse to believe this is true. Literally all you have to do is plug the numbers the word problem gives you into a formula.

  3. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    depends on your field
    if you are aiming for a math phd, then yes
    if you're a memegineer, then you'll feel right at home

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Computer science

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Is your skin color brown or black by any chance?

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          Nope I'm 100% white.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Learn 10 coding languages or grind leetcode for half a year and come back to calculus and it will be breeze.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        you don't need calculus in comp sci. You need discrete math and MAYBE numerical calculus

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          Why do they require it for a cs degree then?

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Ask them. I personally don't understand what a discrete, numerical system called a modern computer has anything to do with real analysis.

            you need to know calculus for numerical calculus

            Not if you're just applying it. Plenty of engineers calculate integrals by literally drawing squares under a curve.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >I personally don't understand what a discrete, numerical system called a modern computer has anything to do with real analysis.
            Have you ever heard of "analysis of algorithms" or "analytic combinatorics"? (Granted, complex analysis is more relevant, still, it builds on exposure to real analysis.)

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            both of your examples are mathematics, not what actual cs people do day-to-day
            I do appreciate the intimate connection between complex analysis, number theory, and combinatorics, but let's be real, cslets think everything is an array or a loop.

          • 2 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >Plenty of engineers calculate integrals by literally drawing squares under a curve.
            bro what, no we do not

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          you need to know calculus for numerical calculus

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        I think accounting only requires one level of calculus, so it's probably not completely over for you.
        Calc 1 is pretty easy, you can probably slug through with some office hours or something. You're paying thousands of dollars for your degree so if they aren't helping you they're basically robbing you.

        YIKES
        sorry you feel for a meme

        I can do most of the problems that involve just using a formula to find the answer, but anything that's a word problem where you're supposed to figure out how to apply calculus to solve some real world problem I have no clue where to even begin.

        Unironically just ignore the words try to move all the information into a mathematical space.
        Start encoding words.

  4. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    You're not getting filtered by calc 1 you're getting filtered by having a poor understanding of the fundamentals (pre-algebra, algebra and trig)

    Make you understand the material you're building on and you'll realize calc is easy

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      I understand all those things pretty well. I just don't think I have the mental capacity to understand how to apply abstract math problems to practical real world problems.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        The average human is functionally moronic, barely qualifies as sapient, and can do most things anyway

        you're making excuses because you don't want to put any effort in because you think math is useless because you're not old enough to realize it's either learn math or wish you knew math so you could solve problems

  5. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I have the sense that for someone with a high IQ, these threads might feel like a nightmare because they involuntarily empathize with the OP, imagining themselves being filtered by Calculus 1. It should evoke a feeling of horror.
    Can any 140+ IQ person confirm this?

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      I don't know if I'm high IQ, just a math major and the idea of struggling in a calc 1 class is utterly inconceivable to me.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >because they involuntarily empathize with the OP
      >any 140+ IQ person confirm this?
      I'm a quant, and I can't truly empathize with that even on purpose. I can understand it on an intellectual level, much like I can consider the idea of finding warm cowpats appealing if one were a manure gnat. More importantly, people who would fail calculus are unpleasant to be around, and I'm content with visiting these threads as a sort of a zoo after they have been filtered out of my life. You can see why empathy has never been on the table.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      He just needs an epiphany.

  6. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    no don't rope. just go into trades. if you can't cruise through freshman courses you're wasting time in academics.

  7. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >Is there any hope for me
    Of course there is. If you just give up now, then you'll never know what you're truly capable of achieving. People will tell you "maybe math just isn't for you", "math isn't for everyone", "some people are just bad at math", etc. But I'm here to tell you that they're dead fricking wrong. Don't you dare fricking listen to them for a second.

    I struggled with math all the way through high school, failed calculus I/II, and teachers would tell my parents that I wasn't mentally capable of doing math. I refused to let that be the case, so I put everything I had into re-learning everything I struggled with. It was daunting, it wasn't easy and it wasn't always pleasant. But now, I'm in college, acing my math courses and accomplishing things I would have never even imagined.

    If I can make it, so can you anon... I believe in you. Fight for those dreams and never give up on 'em. Make that lil man proud 🙂

    Cheers

  8. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Calc is applied discrete math

    Learn discrete and some physics maybe, calc will fall into place

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAAHAH way to out yourself as a brainlet. One spends half the undergrad analysis class learning all the intricacies that come with the completeness axiom and the topology it endows the real line with, as opposed to the discrete topology of incomplete sets

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      This is the stupidest shit I've ever read in this board lmao

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      What a dumbass, jesus
      careful who you listen to OP
      calc 1 is just algebra

  9. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I feel very bad for the intelligent people who fell to the CS meme. Can you imagine being around such people who are filtered by Calc 1 and asking what is the purpose of calculus in CS? Pure nightmare.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Explain what the purpose of calculus is in CS.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        To separate the future codemonkeys (you) and the future intelligent programmers who may want to work in areas such as scientific computing, robotics, data science, but also game/game engine development, software design on architectural level, etc.

  10. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Buy the calculus book by Stewart, do half the problems on your own, try again.

  11. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    If you took it in highschool they deliberately made it hard for no reason

  12. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    It took black science man months of struggle and hard work to learn calculus. Is IQfy claiming that they're all smarter than black science man?

  13. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    To be honest, I feel you. I get mixed up in Cal 2, and I'm struggling. The first exam is coming up, I get confused by the trigonometric identities and pi. And what numbers are equivalent to the various pi fractions. The equations are fine until the trig and pi comes in.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Pi is the circumference of a unit circle

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Okay I get that I am a moron, but it still trips me up when it is incorporated into things. Maybe thinking of it in that way will be helpful. The unit circle occasionally messes me up too, that said.

        I failed Calculus 2 twice, but I passed on the third try after taking a few months off college and going through literally every single problem in Stewart's Calculus book. The biggest issues I had were with substitutions (especially u-dv substitutions and trigonometric substitutions), partial fraction decompositions, and solids of revolution.
        Calc III and Diffy Q were a piece of cake once I really got differentiation and integration down. Hell, even Physics courses became easier for me because I started to get the hang of the intuition behind a lot of concepts associated with area and volume, like pressure and moment of inertia.
        Anybody can make it, bro. You just gotta get on the grind and keep pushing through for a few years. good luck and Jah bless you.

        I can't stop my classes, but that might be a very good suggestion for me. I actually failed Cal 2 last semester and am retaking it, but in an awful coincidence this professor has literally copy and pasted her entire curriculum from my last professor, every assignment is exactly the same all her lectures are just recordings of the other professor from last semester. So it's just a worse version of the class I previously failed, which I do know is still my own fault for not studying adequately. But I will read this book, because it seems like you may be very similar to me anon. Right down to the weed habit.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      I failed Calculus 2 twice, but I passed on the third try after taking a few months off college and going through literally every single problem in Stewart's Calculus book. The biggest issues I had were with substitutions (especially u-dv substitutions and trigonometric substitutions), partial fraction decompositions, and solids of revolution.
      Calc III and Diffy Q were a piece of cake once I really got differentiation and integration down. Hell, even Physics courses became easier for me because I started to get the hang of the intuition behind a lot of concepts associated with area and volume, like pressure and moment of inertia.
      Anybody can make it, bro. You just gotta get on the grind and keep pushing through for a few years. Good luck and Jah bless you.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        That's weird. I wonder want causes people to fail easy math subjects. It's not like mathematics is being dishonest.
        And I call it easy because really you're only learning a handful of tricks you can write down on a paper, compared to a class like real analysis.
        I really just don't get it because I started going to community college at 15. I wasn't an impressive student before that, because I was often bored and didn't care much about what was going on, but I wanted to earn free college credits. I literally started at the basic level of college algebra. I didn't even know what an absolute value function was before that class. Then the next quarter I take calc 1 and get a 4.0 then in spring I take calc 2 and get a 4.0.
        There's nothing special about me at all. My family are mostly unintelligent moron wage slaves and drug users.

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          Marijuana. I spent the first three semesters of college smoking dank-ass weed every single day and couldn't be bothered to open up a textbook back then. Things started getting better as soon as I actually hit the books and exchanged weed for Ritalin.

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          Even most real analysis courses are easy in this way. The "tricks" just get a bit more lengthy, but it's still just knowing theorems & the methods in their proofs

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      First thing my highschool calc I teacher made us do was memorize the unit circle for 45 degrees and multiples of 30 degrees.

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