Gentlemen... we got another one

Gentlemen... we got another one

A Conspiracy Theorist Is Talking Shirt $21.68

CRIME Shirt $21.68

A Conspiracy Theorist Is Talking Shirt $21.68

  1. 1 month ago
    Anonymous
    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >magic, rituals or religion
      >BUT NOT ANYTHING TECHNICAL OR MORE ADVANCED THAN WE THINK. DEFINITELY NOT AND DON'T YOU DARE THINK IT!

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        >hm, this bronze object has a peculiar shape, I wonder what it w-
        >HOLY MOLLY IS THAT AN ALIEN ANTIGRAVITY DEVICE THAT SHOOTS LASERS??!

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          don't you have another article to write about Hanwiener being a nazi, Flint?

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            Take your meds.

  2. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Why the frick does that look like a virus?

  3. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Candle holders.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Explain
      If you mean putting candles in every hole, it doesn't make sense, considering it has holes on every side, meaning you'd put candles on the bottom, too, and that doesn't make sense, it's not practical, and the wax would drip onto the floor. A candle holder would only have holes on one side, the top.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        I don't necessarily think this is what it's for, but the idea is appealing because it could be used to hold candles of many different diameters. Just turn it so the size you want is facing up. Sort of a multi-adapter for nonstandardized appliances.

        I kind of want it to be this because it seems kind of clever.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          but dear moron, the inside would be filled with wax from melted candles, that shit would also drip everywhere from the holes, and why would you rotate it to put in candles of different sizes and do all this frickery when you can just use a fricking bowl?
          it is not a candle holder, that's ridiculous

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      wrong but close. It’s a stylus holder for different sizes.

  4. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    some Roman craftsman having a laugh, littering Europe with these things for no other reason than to troll archaeologists 1700 years after he's dead

  5. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Aliens

  6. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    A while back I 3d printed on of those on whim, and it took me like 30 minutes to figure out what they were used for. Are archeologists really that stupid?

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Did you shove it down your arsehole?

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      so, what did you guess?
      mine is disco ball to play with shadows, or some kind of contraption to make food or paste

  7. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    My theory is that they genuinely served no purpose and were just an ornament for the wealthy that became popular for some reason.

  8. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Hahahaha, "roman artifact" *~~
    Interesting enough object because clearly there are several 100 of those found.
    Object for the banned by TPTB technology - the Sound.
    >ornamental
    >candles
    All bullshit, of course.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >Object for the banned by TPTB technology - the Sound.
      Me again. Based on various forms of this...
      Looks like a camertone or Tuning fork with numerous wave lengths.
      Here's how I'd imagine it to work.
      You put it on a horizontal plane, say stone based.
      And then you move it around and rotate. Until you get a sound or a tune.
      >ancient wifi detector?
      >ancient radion waves detector?
      >ancient electromagnetic waves detector?
      >ancient sound waves detector?

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >*~~
      Hello Russian

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Absolutely buck broken lmao

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          he just pointed out that you're a pidorakha
          a scoof, too
          disgusting

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          >Pointing out an orthographic tell is being "buck broken"
          You sound needlessly butthurt

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >*~~
      Isn't there a battle you should be dying in?

  9. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    instantaneously looked at it and recognized it as a candle holder, probably went in a young roman girls room next to pile of dirty clothes and her tie-dyed sheet hung on the wall.

  10. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    maybe it's some kind of support for beams that support tents and stuff

  11. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >multi sized holes on its faces
    >balls for support
    It's obvious from one observation that it was used to act as a support for cylindrical objects the most likely being candles

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >trust us we needed a complex dodecahedron and icosahedrons shapes and metal to just hold candels
      >don't look at the sound of it
      >don't look that a cup would be a better and 100x cheaper candle holder.
      I mean....... fake historical bullshit is just that , bullshit.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        >all that just for holding candles? that's ridiculous, this must have been a plasma beam turret or something

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          >Maggio
          As in magic, it was a divine artefact. Literally written all over.
          Fake historians are really dumb they can't read

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            >Maggio
            >As in magic
            Do you also think that Maggi is a global supplier of alchemical ingredients and products?

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          >>all that just for holding candles? that's ridiculous, this must have been a plasma beam turret or something
          >compare an incrustated stand to a dodecahedron and icosahedrons .
          It's ok, I understand you don't get the difference. A cup will be a 100x to 1000x cheaper candle stand that any of those PROPER metal shapes.
          You want to play games and claim "candles"?
          But let's play games.
          What is THIS?
          >while I am at it let me link to other "cathedrals" so that you'd get that there are MANY:
          https://duckduckgo.com/?q=cathedral&iar=images&iax=images&ia=images

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            >A cup will be a 100x to 1000x cheaper candle stand that any of those PROPER metal shapes.
            You're perfectly right, and yet humans will be using a 2 meters tall silver-gilded statue of a greek figure to hold up their candles anyway.

            Or look at this.
            >How could this be a practical candle holder? Complex Geometric shape? Precious metal? Just holes without cups?
            Yet it is.

            >Maggio
            As in magic, it was a divine artefact. Literally written all over.
            Fake historians are really dumb they can't read

            >As in magic, it was a divine artefact.
            Weren't you complaining that "fake historians" claimed the Roman dodecahedrons were for "magic, rituals or religion"?

            >what is THIS?
            Your schizophrenia in action.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            Nah, not candle holders.
            Those are devices that detect electrical , electromagnetic, radio or sound waves.

            When you are building a house that is using free atmospheric electricity , similarly to how you use free wifi , free radio or free TV stations signal over the air. Or how million phones are connected to the same cell tower.
            Absolutely just like that you need device to identify which frequencies / sounds or which wifi / internet / mobile provider is in your area.
            AND , buddy, you also have to have the stations that supply that free wifi/internet or free atmospheric electricity.

            https://i.imgur.com/3cP9BtO.jpeg

            >>all that just for holding candles? that's ridiculous, this must have been a plasma beam turret or something
            >compare an incrustated stand to a dodecahedron and icosahedrons .
            It's ok, I understand you don't get the difference. A cup will be a 100x to 1000x cheaper candle stand that any of those PROPER metal shapes.
            You want to play games and claim "candles"?
            But let's play games.
            What is THIS?
            >while I am at it let me link to other "cathedrals" so that you'd get that there are MANY:
            https://duckduckgo.com/?q=cathedral&iar=images&iax=images&ia=images

            >those aren't pyramids, churches or cathedrals, anon.
            Your schizophrenia is about to call now.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            Reminds me of an old joke.

            >The French conducted archaeological excavations and found remains of copper wires 50 meters underground. After they were carefully examined by scientists, it was concluded that the ancestors of the French, the Gauls, created an underground telephone network.
            >In response to this unexpected news, the Germans, in order not to be outdone, also started to dig. 70 meters underground, they found remains of glass; after analyzing this glass, they concluded that their ancestors, the Goths, created an underground fiber optic network.
            >Romanian researchers followed suit and also started to excavate. After digging for 250 meters without finding anything, they concluded the Dacians had Wi-Fi.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            Anon, yep. You can buy a cheap $100 chinese drone and a copper wire, send it over 100 meters in the air and get free electricity. Voltage is actually very strong up there.
            >hmm if I could actually find a tall stone building
            >hmm why did they build a so called "church" in every town as one of the 1st buildings?
            >tall narrow building would be completely worthless if you wanted many people to gather
            >tall narrow stone building would be great as a free atmospheric electricity generating power plant.
            I am sure it's a lot easier to send power over a specific frequency vs. supporting Mhz , Ghz etc. audio and video transmission that modern day cell towers can do.
            >why or why don't they send electrical signals over the air?
            >can't bill you

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            Textbook example of logorrhea (or graphorrhea, properly speaking.)

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            >Voltage is actually very strong up there.
            What about the amperage?

        • 1 month ago
          DoctorGreen

          >Maggio
          As in magic, it was a divine artefact. Literally written all over.
          Fake historians are really dumb they can't read

          kek

          https://i.imgur.com/nhqjV0z.png

          Gentlemen... we got another one

          you told me it was a weaving tool, IQfy. now you are saying it was a candle holder.
          what's next?

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      why the different sized holes, what about the holes facing downward? I think it's obvious you aint got a clue what the frick it is.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Different sized candles I would guess. Tbf though I think The Experts had discounted the candle theory for some reason iirc.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        b***h you're supposed to rotate it to have the hole that fits your cylindrical object of choice the best facing up. They're different width to accomodate for all sort of sizes.
        You don't have to be a genuis to guess that much

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          but dear moron, the inside would be filled with wax from melted candles, that shit would also drip everywhere from the holes, and why would you rotate it to put in candles of different sizes and do all this frickery when you can just use a fricking bowl?
          it is not a candle holder, that's ridiculous

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            For sure there are other more practical ways to light your home. But it's been pretty well covered above that lots of people are fond of using unnecessarily ornate and sometimes not less practical things for ordinary applications. Again I'm not saying I think this is what it is for, just that I don't think it can be written off with saying you'd have to have candles in every hole, including the bottom...

            for all I know there was a bowl under it to catch wax. as far as candle holders go, they do tend to get wax all over them.

  12. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Some day in the future they will unearth a fidget spinner, and ponder deeply about the purpose of the artefact.

  13. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >the civilization that was sending messages on horseback written on papyrus scrolls had public wi-fi
    your brain on pseudohistory

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Your mind on mediocre white man contrarianism
      ftfy

  14. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    There so many fricking proofs of aliens but of course the fricking media will deny it all and the government censors will redact it all. Fricking sheeple. WAKE UP HOLY SHIT.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      It is a model of the planets visible in the night sky at that time. All clustered together held apart by electrical repulsion, causing glowing circular links between them. This may be what is meant by King Arthur's round table.

      This is called Electric Universe theory today but it goes back to the 1920s with Commyns Beaumont and the 1940s with Velikovsky.

  15. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >1700 years old
    who gives a shit? if it's not from the republican period it's worth dogshit ass frick all.

  16. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    There's just something about the schizo zoomer mind that is inherently buglike and soulless, incapable of appreciating the wild creativity and artistic freedom that comes naturally to regular people, not to mention the conspicuous, refined luxury of the aristocrats, so just about any artifact triggers a mental breakdown and they work themselves into a frenzy trying to "rationalize" the perfectly mundane object.

    Pic related, a scraper for muddy boots.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      A wall variant of the bootscraper.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        a Fabergé paperweight, a useless lump of material meant to pin down papers on your desk so they don't fly away when you open a window. For some reason these often take the shape of animal sculptures in the West, though there are many other variants.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          A netsuke, a japanese cord-fastener worn at the waist. Essentially a buckle for traditionally japanese fanny packs. The cord often went through holes on the bottom and come out of the sculpture somewhere.
          Many, many variants, most of them made of ivory imported from South Asia.
          https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Category:Netsuke

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            A nutmeg grater. Nutmeg was a fairly expensive spice, so you didn't want to waste any and you'd grate it over a box, eventually that was combined into a single object that took various shapes from powder boxes, batons or urns. Luxury item so often gilded with silver and such. Some variants use cowrie shells as the receptacle.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            A set of cutlery with its case. Variants including standing urn-like cases, especially for keeping a diversity of knives.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            >a diversity of knives.
            Incidently this is the collective noun for knives in modern British English

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            A rhyton, an animal-head wine vessel used for drinking (much like the drinking horn from which it probably evolved) or, when it's that elaborate, used for ritual libation (pouring wine on the ground)
            The wine generally flowed out of the animal's mouth or nostrils.

            >a diversity of knives.
            Incidently this is the collective noun for knives in modern British English

            kek

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          not so useless
          I'd imagine these bad boys helped many composers immensely when they needed to open the window after a sweaty goon/frick session with their lady fans or shit-eating female cousins

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          https://i.imgur.com/ok8Lx8Q.jpeg

          A netsuke, a japanese cord-fastener worn at the waist. Essentially a buckle for traditionally japanese fanny packs. The cord often went through holes on the bottom and come out of the sculpture somewhere.
          Many, many variants, most of them made of ivory imported from South Asia.
          https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Category:Netsuke

          https://i.imgur.com/wb5In1s.jpeg

          A nutmeg grater. Nutmeg was a fairly expensive spice, so you didn't want to waste any and you'd grate it over a box, eventually that was combined into a single object that took various shapes from powder boxes, batons or urns. Luxury item so often gilded with silver and such. Some variants use cowrie shells as the receptacle.

          https://i.imgur.com/ZSsRRWk.jpeg

          A set of cutlery with its case. Variants including standing urn-like cases, especially for keeping a diversity of knives.

          https://i.imgur.com/OGnokzx.jpeg

          A "beauty case" or cosmetic box (including a bronze mirror, I think)

          What are the keywords to look up ornate trinkets like these?

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            There are none as far as I know, it's just my autism for curios.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          how many hundreds of these do you expect they'll find lying around 1500 years from now?

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            Fabergé works are naturally rare, but the classic animal sculpture paperweights? Tens of thousands of high-end ones were produced and many more imitations, and they should be quite durable.
            As for the current fashion of paperweight, glass or resin balls with sulphide/incrustated floral/psychedelic patterns in them? Millions of them in offices around the world.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      No it's clearly an alien artefact to open a gate to the other dimension

  17. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    It's used to hold torches.

  18. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Easiest answer: it was just an onahole

  19. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    A "trapezophoros", legs or stands used to hold up marble tables.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      It's more modern descendant, the pedestal table. (In this case, I think it's a nightstand.)

  20. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    A "beauty case" or cosmetic box (including a bronze mirror, I think)

  21. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    A fairly modern Japanese inkstone (diamond-coated)

  22. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Platonism-Pythagoreanism was popular throughout antiquity, and it's not hard to imagine a religious man has his best craftsman make him the best Platonic solid out of metal to assist him with Pythagorean rituals. If it were just a little bauble they wouldn't bury it on a hill like that, and the fact that a hundred have been found means it probably shares one purpose, unlike a stylized and unique decoration.

  23. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I think it has to do with light. You shine a light through, around, above holes, or even put the light inside, something like that. See these protrusions? They make different shadows based on the angle of the light. I think that's where the solution is. Maybe some kind of toy, a kaleidoscope, some kind of ancient disco ball.

  24. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    A Roman steelyard balance. It's unclear who the kid is.

  25. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Maybe the protrusions are for tying ropes. It's a yoyo or a gyroscope of some kind. Like a toy or some shit. You tie ropes to it, and attach the ropes to hooks on the walls, ceiling, floor, and place it in the middle of the room according to instructions and calculations. You twist this thing, and it moves around the room, but returns to its original position.
    Maybe it really is a gyroscope of some kind, for sea-faring.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >You tie ropes to it, and attach the ropes to hooks on the walls, ceiling, floor, and place it in the middle of the room according to instructions and calculations.
      actually, wait, I'm moronic
      you can do it in a box
      a box with hooks inside
      maybe medium-sized, maybe huge box

  26. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    A massive Japanese "prayer wheel", really more of a rotary scroll-shelf.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Are you just posting curious things, or trying to say that if we were to find this without any context, we'd be making wild theories and guesses?
      Well, this is clearly a container, nothing puzzling about it.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Sort of the latter, but mainly things that go far beyond the merely practical.

        Sword in scabbard/stand, Fang people of Gabon.

  27. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    what if it's used to make something, like food or wax
    you put the mass through the bigger hole, and "noodles" come out

  28. 1 month ago
    Meridia

    A NEW HAND TOUCHES THE BEACON.

  29. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    to all the candleholder-sect members: not all of these artifacts have holes.

  30. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    My bet? Almost certainly a device for gambling of some game of chance. I have heard they are usually found where coins were stored.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      What if it was somehow used to melt and shape metal into tubes that you could cut to make coins?

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        wait, no, then you'd find it in smithies and blacksmith's homes

        [...]
        Maybe to check that the coins were the correct size, people were constantly trimming coins and selling the material for extra cash. you could have one hole that was the correct size and another slightly smaller which only a trimmed coin would fit through. Doesn't explain the orbs though

        >Doesn't explain the orbs
        comfortable for holding in between your thumb and index/middle finger, which also makes me think about gambling or playing

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          Plus, the knobs would make the bouncing chaotic if you had to throw it against a wall for a valid throw to win.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          What if it's like a sundial? Maybe you can put a light inside, and it always shows a consistent value for measuring, you know, the way a tuning fork is used to tune instruments and it always makes the same sound

          replying to my own post
          >comfortable for holding in between your thumb and index/middle finger
          if that's the case, it being a precision instrument springs to mind. Optical, maybe? What if the holes had lenses? What if light went through it like some kind of prism, or disco ball, a kaleidoscope?

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        I doubt it. The metal is too soft, and if you wanted to cut coins, you’re gonna want to use a hard metal like iron or steel. Plus, the inner diameter of the tube is more important than the outer diameter.
        Instead, imagine this: a group of friends place coins into the device, the size and value of the coins determines the chance of a winning roll. The player rolls the device to get his winning side up, and if he does, he wins the coins inside, but if a coin falls out, the house wins, or the next player wins that coin. Something like that.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          That does seem plausible, it does look similar to dice

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      That'd certainly make sense.

      Metal jacks and "walnut", for playing knucklebones.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      What if it was somehow used to melt and shape metal into tubes that you could cut to make coins?

      Maybe to check that the coins were the correct size, people were constantly trimming coins and selling the material for extra cash. you could have one hole that was the correct size and another slightly smaller which only a trimmed coin would fit through. Doesn't explain the orbs though

  31. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    A hitching post (for tying your horse, typically just a metal ring on a stone block)

  32. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    For reference, here's how Romans played knucklebones:

    >The first, and probably the primitive method, consisted in tossing up and catching the bones on the back of the hand, very much as the game is played today. This simple form of the game was generally only played by women and children, and was called penta litha or five-stones.
    >There were several varieties of this game besides the usual toss and catch; one being called tropa, or hole-game, the object of which was to toss the bones into a hole in the earth. Another was the simple game of odd or even.
    >The second, probably derivative, form of the game was one of pure chance, with a pastern bone being thrown upon a table, either from the hand or from a cup, and the values of the sides upon which they fell were counted. The pastern bone of a sheep, goat, or calf has two rounded ends upon which it cannot stand and two broad and two narrow sides, one of each pair being concave and one convex. The convex narrow side, called chios or "the dog", was counted as 1, the convex broad side as 3, the concave broad side as 4, and the concave narrow side as 6.

    You could certainly imagine that object being used for either the hole game (the smaller the hole, the more you win?) or somehow rolled, and it'd be way more regular than the bones normally used as gambling (including for dice)

  33. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Ritual knives used by Korean shamans for divination. The ritual consists of throwing them on the ground to see how they land (if the blades are facing each other or away from each other or facing the same direction, etc)

  34. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    What if it's a fricking sundial-like clock, no, watch, somehow. Maybe holes represent time. 12 hours. What if it's a nighttime indoor sundial? It detects time with the help of some kind of mechanism that moves light in a consistent pattern. Maybe a special candle made with specific, consistent measures and materials, so it burns at a consistent rate AND reduces itself. A shadow clock.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      But also, if they made a candle that burned at a consistent rate, they could just draw notches on the candle and know what time it is and skip all this bullshit
      Well, you know what I mean, they somehow found a way to move light at a consistent rate
      maybe a water-propelled mechanism

  35. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    A roman askos (oil-vessel, usually for refilling lamps)

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      I'd think it's for drinking/brewing tea if I didn't know

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >works cited

  36. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Baby bottles. In the bronze age they were often rounder and even breast-shaped.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      I'd guess whistles or pipes for tobacco/weed
      but they'd likely be covered in soot and ashes, so them being clean makes it implausible

  37. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    It's a gateway device to Agartha.

  38. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Etruscan lebes, a vessel for holy(?) water. If it's like the Greek lebes gamikos, it was probably used to sprinkle the bride during the wedding ceremony or something.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      I'm trying to guess what these are without reading your descriptions

      this is a decorative container for wine for rituals and revelry
      might be used for food, too, or a fancy water container
      maybe it's for ashes of the dead?
      the bottom part might also be for wool to wrap around it, it's for sewing or something
      maybe for working with clay, moulding it
      the top might be for storage of clay
      it's possible that it's for incense

      https://i.imgur.com/tQ0PiJP.jpeg

      An inuit wolf-repeller. You swing it around to make a sort of vrooom noises.

      this might be a musical instrument, or something used to scare away animals, you drag the rectangular thing against the bug-looking thing to make a noise
      but for it to be an instrument to make noises, it would maybe need to be wooden, and if this is ancient, wood wouldn't last, so it's not wood if ancient, and something harder would probably get ground against itself
      it does somewhat resemble obsidian
      so I'm saying it's a ritual instrument, even though it'd be sharp AND fragile, so maybe it's reserved for special occasions
      or you know, a non-obsidian ritual instrument
      or it's a toy

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        oh shit
        look at that shit man, a water container and something to scare away animals
        I should become an archaeologist

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        also, it just hit me that the clay thing wouldn't work
        it's too ornate
        a craftsman's tool wouldn't be so ornate, besides, if you were to for some reason mould clay around it, it would grate away at the drawings

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        >you drag the rectangular thing
        moron. You spin the shit. Literal abos do the same thing.

  39. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    An inuit wolf-repeller. You swing it around to make a sort of vrooom noises.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      I'd have figured it was a flail of some sort.
      Neat

  40. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Those are used for knitting.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      They are definitely not for knitting. I knit, and do historical textile stuff. They only have five knobs on each side, you’d never be able to make a finger for a glove like that. Roman ‘knitted’ stuff I’ve seen was more like a Coptic stitch / nålbindjng kind of fabric. I’m not sure what they are but knitting tool is right at the bottom of the list for me.
      Surveying, timekeeping perhaps. Not knitting,

      what size would you like your gloves sir?
      here is a tool for deciding the finger sizes and working on it. the regions they are found in are places you want gloves due to shitty weather. yes i know spool knitting wasnt 'invented' for another 1000 years. these guys were special and the tools were kept on death

      you're welcome

      do you knit? Try making a finger for a glove with only five stitches. You’ll need such thick bulky roving that it’ll fragment. Look at Roman textile, it’s using a worsted weight yarn at most.

  41. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Can anyone figure out what this is? Its a geared mechanism dating from the han but its purpose is still uncertain. My guess is some sort of brake mechanism for like a cart or something.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Maybe something for irrigation.

      https://i.imgur.com/nhqjV0z.png

      Gentlemen... we got another one

      This one's a mystery. Maybe you would tie rope into it or around it for some purpose. The outer notches seem to suggest this. Whether it's for a practical use or as entertainment is unknown. As a shot in the dark, maybe you would tie multiple animals together using it?

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      lies, are you claiming the han invented that lower-right double gear? interesting if true.

      the middle-left gear could be used together with a sprocket and chain to make a garage door opener.

      the bottom-right must have been under high pressure or very high speed?

      this is very interesting anon.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        The han were responsible for a pretty large array of technical firsts for the chinese. They were one of the more innovative dynasties for sure (them and the tang and song). They even had cool standardized tent set ups for logistics. I know they used gears for armillary spheres in the 1st century but idk what they used these specific ones for sure. Iirc these were found near carts which would be a logical assumption for the brake theory but it couldve been the carts carrying a seperate mechanism.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          The tents were also modular and they also had more "yurt" like configurations. Here are a couple of examples along with other gadgets they had.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            amazing, so many of them are copper and bronze, i wonder if earlier cultures had similar stuff that just rotted away. the shang has some elaborate artifacts, i wonder what held them back from mass-producing medium-sized sundries.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Braking mechanism for siege equipment, like catapults.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      https://i.imgur.com/nXstE4M.jpeg

      The han were responsible for a pretty large array of technical firsts for the chinese. They were one of the more innovative dynasties for sure (them and the tang and song). They even had cool standardized tent set ups for logistics. I know they used gears for armillary spheres in the 1st century but idk what they used these specific ones for sure. Iirc these were found near carts which would be a logical assumption for the brake theory but it couldve been the carts carrying a seperate mechanism.

      I doubt you'd build something like that for just a cart. Especially on those days.
      I'd imagine it was part of some kind of crane or other loading mechanism, something stationary that you could keep an eye on.

  42. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >mysterious roman artefact
    jfc, it was for knitting.

  43. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    -one was buried with an older man, so it indicates either a favourite pastime, a profession or a religion
    -none have been found as brooches or amulets so its unlikely to be a religious object
    -100s have been found, often carefully disposed of. this suggests they might have been something you didnt want non-romans to get a hold of, perhaps as it gave an advantage economically or militarily, or maybe it was a sacred object

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >unlikely to be a religious object
      >maybe it was a sacred object
      So which is it.

  44. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    what size would you like your gloves sir?
    here is a tool for deciding the finger sizes and working on it. the regions they are found in are places you want gloves due to shitty weather. yes i know spool knitting wasnt 'invented' for another 1000 years. these guys were special and the tools were kept on death

    you're welcome

  45. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    This is clearly a miniature satellite dish, there's no way it could be a candle holder, the wax would drip everywhere and that would be impractical.

  46. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    office desk decorations

  47. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *