>get an engineering degree. >take all the higher level applied math courses never getting less than a 3.8

>get an engineering degree
>take all the higher level applied math courses never getting less than a 3.8
>open a textbook on math
>understand nothing

why is it like this bros, how am i supposed to figure stuff out about the world if my whole entire education to this point was not even enough to understand the intro books for this shit, do you just sit in your room and grind it out for the rest of your days while putting 2% effort in your normie software job? because I don't know if I want that bros, I think that id want big thighs wrapped around my head way more

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  1. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    bro deleted an anonymous comment, anyways careful about the big thighs you could end up thinking about them every day for the rest of your life

  2. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    you sure do seem to like talking about yourself on social media

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      yeah

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Shut up you stupid Asian-American asiatic. You post this comment too much.

  3. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Usually I can read 3 math books a week.
    I think you problem is that you're thinking to think about the words, math is not about words.
    You're reading information that builds upon itself.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      What kind of math books do you read, nigguh?

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        Dover and springer
        but springer are so fricking ugly
        also every second month I go to various thrift stores to scour for math books.
        I once bought 12 books for 25 dollars.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      do you do the problems? I don't think about the words, I try to follow the logic but if I can't logically follow it can be frustrating and I did ZERO proofs my entire education so I get lost easily in mathematical reasoning. And even if I do follow the example reasoning, a lot of the time the problems just blast it up to 11 and expect you to make tons of intuitive assumptions.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        >do you do the problems?
        Only after I read it and they look fun, or if they're essential for understanding, which I fricking hate when they do that.

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          How do you know you're really getting the concepts and not just mechanically reading? Do you apply the math at all or is it just for fun?

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            I just told you math is only about the concepts not the reading itself, the words if anything can only hold you back.
            The fact is that is doesn't really matter because I'm not going to remember every ass hair your mom has "oh hey that's ass hair number 2939201" nor will I remember the 293204th word in baby rudin. I do it all to build both intuition and reference. Memory and mastery are just mechanisms of habit, I will learn new information but it won't be immediately useful until I find a way to use it. This is why I ignore most problems, they are often for the sake of themselves.
            The amount of math you need to know before you can have fun inside your head is a lot. That was always my goal, I wanted to think about math in my mind.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            I actually used to think like that a bit especially because I did well in school until I tried doing some problems and projects with my math and realized it was extremely inadequate. One thing I found that you can't gain by just reading and following concepts is the intuition for how to rearrange and change equations, see certain patterns in equations quickly and ultimately understand the derivation and reasoning behind things. Do you never feel like youre missing these things? What kind of math do you think about?

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            I actually used to think like that a bit especially because I did well in school until I tried doing some problems and projects with my math and realized it was extremely inadequate. One thing I found that you can't gain by just reading and following concepts is the intuition for how to rearrange and change equations, see certain patterns in equations quickly and ultimately understand the derivation and reasoning behind things. Do you never feel like youre missing these things? What kind of math do you think about?

            just as an example in this book im trying to get through. while i can follow his reasoning as far as why it diverges especially at the end understanding how he gets from the left sum to the right sum and determines what terms are greater takes me a long time to walk through and convince myself

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            A formula is high density information itself, expect to spend some time and writing on it. The paragraph accompanies it is interesting trivia if done correstly or a waste of time like any poop sci explain.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            I don't understand. If f(x) evaluates to some value, then the square of f(x) is that value squared. How can there be divergence?

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            Because squaring it makes all the negative values positive, so it conditionally converges but doesn't absolutely converge. How they get from the left sum to the right sum I have no idea, some kind of distribution clearly but the sum bound changes as well so I really don't know.

        • 2 months ago
          El Arcón

          >I fricking hate when they do that.
          Yeah, books like that are written to get teachers to make their students pay for them more than they are written to make the reader of the book understand the material. I also hate it when they do that.

  4. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    If you don't need to know it, you don't need to learn it. If you did your degree, are able to get a job and be competitive, you don't even need to know what the frick a Fourier analysis or even a derivative is. It doesn't sound to me like you actually need to know any of that stuff that you don't understand for your field. Just ignore it, the ability to ignore pointless "knowledge" is very useful. You can't learn EVERYTHING under the sun, just learn what you need forget about all the Extra math shit, IQfy is meming you into studying complex math textbooks, nobody does that in real life unless you want to be an autistic mathematician.

    The desire to learn everything, no matter how useless it might be, is quite often ruinous. Just like homies trying to learn 8 languages instead of focusing on the one (or two) that they will actually ever have to use in their life.

  5. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Try this (without cheating)
    If you can't solve this, you should drop out
    Nowadays, many people are involved in stuff they are simply not cut out for, which in turn leads to bitterness and frustration.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Here is another one, these are very basic high school level algebra problems.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        Okay I got as far as 2logmx=logkx+lognx , what book is that? What's the actual proof?

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          The problem is from a Russian mathematics problem book by V lidsky et al

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            nice, yeah I see what you mean about just basic algebra. clever about using the definition of log in the last two lines. imo I will not give up on math just yet

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      So you have n 1s in the 1st column, then n-1 in the next and so on, I guess you have to take something like n % 9 for the carry if n is greater than 9, not sure how to get a closed formula which I assume is what they want. For the second I think it's something with n^2=x and then putting the other two terms equal to x but I forgot how to move the logs around.

      Anyways there's nothing for me to drop out of, I finished college and have a job. But I just feel like understanding the world and how it works is important and I'm not getting any of that out of life right now, it honestly makes me anxious to not even try to understand things, which is why I keep coming back and trying to dip my toe in.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        Is your job some soulless corporate wage slavery?
        If you wanted to be an academic, you should have gone to graduate school.
        Nowadays making money isn't hard, finding a good & *real* job is.
        A job where you learn something new and face novel challenges everyday, keeps your interested.
        Most jobs nowadays are boring and repetitive, they lack any bigger form, you are like a cog in the machine.
        Very few people are working on long-term projects today, despite working for years, they have nothing to show for, neither they have developed any speciall skill, not they have anything physical they have produced.

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          Nah my job is super easy, "software engineering" but since so many people in the industry are 50+ and never learned anything you really only have to write a script here and there because no one knows wtf is going on. Which I guess gives you a lot of time to do other stuff which used to just be video games but this is just eating at me. I don't really want anything out of it, I just want to understand the stuff better for its own sake.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      i forgot the correct tag
      [math]
      [ sum_{i=1}^{n-1} 10^i(n-i) ]
      [/math]

  6. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >understand nothing
    Since you only got the applied side, you never learned all of the things relevant to doing mathematics.
    I believe learning all of the niche examples/counter-examples which strain the conditions of theorems is really important.
    A big part of doing math is trying to broaden the antecedent or to strengthen the consequent of a theorem (these goals are always pulling in opposite directions).
    This process can motivate new definitions in both the antecedent and the consequent of the theorem.
    Then there is just the general intuition that goes into proving things. The process of doing proofs is something that is hard to learn on your own because you need to be a reliable referee of your own game. This requires you know the rules of the game and develop the mindset of a critic that asks the right questions. This is where having an expert/professor helps to be a perfect referee so you can learn how to do it to yourself.
    The constructing of proofs while satisfying the referee is where the IQ/cleverness comes in. There is no formula and you just kinda develop over time a bunch of heuristics/intuitions for what approaches are most likely fruitful for which situations.
    With all of this background (and the baseline familiarity with all of the buzzwords), reading math books tends to make more sense since you can get a sense of where the author is going before he gets there.

  7. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Holy shit are you me? I have a compsci degree and this is how I feel too. How do I build up the required mathematical maturity?

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