Has there ever been an "abbreviated religion"? I was thinking about Sun Tzu's The Art Of War.

Has there ever been an "abbreviated religion"? I was thinking about Sun Tzu's The Art Of War. Almost everyone can recall passages from it. It's only 46 pages (in english paperback form). Tzu managed to cram a lot of digestible easily understood wisdom into a very short length. Now compare that to religious texts. The Bible is needlessly obtuse. Just as a lot of alphabets were designed to be difficult to learn, thereby artificially creating upper castes and lower castes based on literacy, a lot of religious texts were written to be obtuse, verbose, and nebulous, necessitating trained priests to properly instruct their disciples.

It got me wondering. Has anyone ever created an "abbreviated religion", a very short text of very simple understandable approachable guidelines and stuff like that? Something more than the Code Of Hammurabi or The Ten Commandments, but vastly less voluminous than The Bible / Koran / Torah etc. A religious text steeped in wisdom of similar volume to The Art Of War.

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  1. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I think you answered your own question, a "short" religion is probably seen as not having enough authority behind it, without a mountain of dusty scrolls to back it up

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >a "short" religion is probably seen as not having enough authority behind it

      This was my conclusion as well. I was reading about "new bibles" written by people claiming to be "channeling" higher beings, like The Urantia Book, and Oahspe: A New Bible. Urantia is 2,000 pages long. Oahspe is 1,000 pages long. And it struck me that the sheer volume of a book makes it seem more mystical than it really is. There are still people that believe in the Urantia book. If the author had distilled it down to 46 pages it wouldn't have had the same mystique.

      But... I wonder if that is always the case... There are hundreds of military treatises, from the Greeks up to modern day. I think even Mao Zedong wrote one. But The Art Of War is arguably the most famous because it's the most approachable. Everyone can read it and understand it. Surely a properly written short concise religious text could have similar power.

      This makes no sense. The Bible is a historical narrative, and there's a lot of history to go over, so it's long. There's no "obtuse" language if you're reading in your native language.

      I think a religious text should be a manual. A manual for better living, greater spirituality, etc. Yet in so many cases, religious texts are rambling stories about historical narratives and a lot of the benefits one is supposed to gain from reading it are gained only after "studying" it and finding "deeper meanings". This is deliberate, to make the text seem more profound, like you have to really struggle to find the hidden truths. It's a narrative trick. There may be deep wisdom and truth in the major religious texts of the world, but they're written so that you struggle to find it, necessitating devotion, and faith. By design. This serves to create a religious hierarchy, but does not serve to better guide the individual. These are my own conclusions of course.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        >I think a religious text should be a manual. A manual for better living, greater spirituality, etc.
        That sounds moronic. You just described self-help books, which are already scams.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          Not that guy, but I think most self-help books are more about lifting people's self-esteem and making them believe they're capable of doing big stuff than feeling that they can be in connection with the universe or that they should learn to be good and humble. I feel like certain books, such as Epictetus' Epitome and certain devotion works written by Christian saints (like St. Thomas a Kempis' The Imitation of Christ) fulfill a similar purpose to what he mentioned, but the Bible and the Vedas do not.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        >stories about historical narratives
        Do you know what board you are currently on?

  2. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    The Analects are relatively short

  3. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I kind of have a book like what you are talking about. It is called The Kabbalistic Bible by Rabbi Tanhuma. It is a just a compilations of scriptures and wisdom. It is quite short to read with a large text size. I bet it could nicely in a pocket with the right formatting and binding.

    The Torah is full of holy fire; it was written with a black fire upon a white fire.

    The Torah has meekness as its footgear, and the fear of God as its crown. Hence Moses was the proper person through whose hands it should be delivered; he was meek, and with the fear of the Lord he was crowned.

    You can not expect to occupy yourself with the study of the Torah in the future world and receive the reward for so doing in this world; you are meant to make the Torah your own in this life, and to look for reward in the life to come.

  4. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    This makes no sense. The Bible is a historical narrative, and there's a lot of history to go over, so it's long. There's no "obtuse" language if you're reading in your native language.

  5. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    The Qur'an is like, 604 pages you lazy frick. Third world orphans have significant parts of it memorized. There are literally memorization and recitation competitions for children.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >The Qur'an is like, 604 pages
      Of repetitive, demonic garbage.

  6. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    How about some clear and concise autistic religious nationalism?

    The Book of the Law of the Lord
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Book_of_the_Law_of_the_Lord
    https://openscriptures.net/library/lds-other/#dearflip-df_501/1/

    The Book of the Law of the Lord is a sacred book of scripture used by the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints (Strangite), a sect of the Latter Day Saint movement. It is alleged to be a translation by the Strangite prophet James Strang of the brass Plates of Laban, which were originally acquired by Nephi, a leading figure in the early portion of the Book of Mormon.

    The book contains an elaborate constitution for a theocratic kingdom, in which the prophet-leader of the Latter Day Saint church equally rules as king over God's kingdom on earth. The expanded version also contains various other revelations and teachings added by Strang to explain it.

    Another unique feature of the Book of the Law is its version of the Decalogue, the "Ten Commandments" given to Moses on Sinai. Strang's rendering is different from any other israeli, Catholic, Eastern Orthodox, Islamic or Protestant version, for it offers a commandment none of the others has: "Thou shalt love thy neighbor as thyself." In his "Note on the Decalogue," Strang asserted that no other version of the Decalogue contains more than nine commandments, and speculates that his fourth commandment was lost perhaps as early as Josephus's time (circa AD 37–100).

  7. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    the dao de jing and works of chuang tzu are good simple aphoristic writing, simple labourers and farmers could grasp those truths

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      yeah afaik Taoism is the closest religion to what OP is looking for. especially considering he wants something similar to Sun Tzu

  8. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    The Art of War is mid af ngl.

  9. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Here's an intro to a religion that is solitary (solo practice) and eminently practical.
    >But but
    I guarantee you that the people who believe in It, are about 9 billion times more serious about it than the coomers in these threads of his.

  10. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Mao's Little Red Book and Gaddafi's Green Book.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Anyone got any excerpts from Gaddafi's book? I've always been curious about that. He may have been a dictator, but it was always one of his aspirations to elevate North Africans, so I wonder if any of that kind of thinking made its way into his book.

  11. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    This and similar projects are probably the closest you get for Christianity, just a pure concise description of the life and teachings of Jesus. Maybe Gospel of Thomas for just a list of sayings

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