Have you ever managed to brick your linux install to the point where reinstalling was easier than fixing the actual issue?

Have you ever managed to brick your linux install to the point where reinstalling was easier than fixing the actual issue? If yes how did that happen?

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  1. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I treat everything as cattle vs. kittens so reinstalling is a no-brainer. If an installation gets dorked up it's usually a update to the OS installer that makes bad assumptions, is usually a regression and usually gets fixed.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Nice analogy, had to look it up buy it's cool.

  2. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    part of why i like arch is how easy it is to reinstall and how it comes barebones so i know any mistakes are my own fault
    i will often reinstall because it takes like 2 minutes at most from a cold boot to be back at my desktop with all my files and configs pulled from my self-hosted backup repo

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      How do you brick it so often that you have a whole routine focused on reinstalling arch. The only times it got too messed up for me is when new nvidia drivers absolutely annihilated xorg.

      A few times, when I was playing around with dual booting, you literally cant have windows exist on the same drive as your linux root partition without installing windows first.

      I had windows on a separate drive and it still killed the linux bootloader. Windows is actual evil software.

  3. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    A few times, when I was playing around with dual booting, you literally cant have windows exist on the same drive as your linux root partition without installing windows first.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >dual booting
      Those are the only times my system has ever been badly broken as well. Eventually I just switched over entirely to linux and stopped using windows altogether.

  4. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Messing up with apt in debian with tons of package pinned and tons of different repos including backports. While it still worked fine outside of being unable to update (all apt solutions would break it), reinstalling doesn't take more than a few hours and no headaches. It was a long while ago, and something similar happened with windows 10 recently (updated and after login it was a black screen that I could only access the process manager but not run stuff properly), and I had to undo the update in the recovery menu leaving me in a state that if I do update it will probably break again (and reinstalling would have the extra annoyance of having to reinstall grub on the mbr to access linux).

  5. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    happens when upgrade, install everything and disregard any dependency management

  6. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Ugh, no? Is it even possible? Like even if you frick up your libc, package manager, all your packages you can always load from liveusb, reinstall libc, package manager, remove all configs and reinstall all the packages

  7. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    It's pretty easy to encounter circular dependency hell in Gentoo, and one way to get around it is to say frick it and start from scratch.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Rarely happens to me. If it went badly, I'd probs use a fresh stage 3 as a clean build environment.

  8. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    bash shit the bed. like didn't work at all. couldn't find a fix online so I just nuked the OS partition and reinstalled.

  9. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    ywnbaw

  10. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I set the system time to year 2050 to try and fake out a client side service and accidentally 2038d myself.

  11. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    tons of times
    my worst one was manually setting USE flags on individual packages on gentoo
    daily driver for months until I tried to update, none of the packages remembered their custom flags so they all broke

  12. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I was using Cinnamon on Debian, apt upgrade and everything went to shit. Restarted and my DE was gone. No idea why. At that point I decided to just reinstall and use XFCE.

  13. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Yeah I forgot to install the GUI and was stuck with a command line.
    I threw the hard drive away afterwards

  14. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I fricked up my audio in Debian and I could never figure out how to make output through my audio interface sound so rich again. I ended up installing OpenBSD and I have since been too lazy to set up my audio interface.

  15. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    i went to test plasma 6 beta and it was easier to reinstall than to revert

  16. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    When I started using linux one time I somehow fricked up GRUB and didn't know how to fix it. It booted into GRUB rescue.

  17. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    When I was 12 I deleted "Unity" on my Ubuntu VM thinking "I don't need a game engine on Linux". Also when I was dual booting for the first time I moronicly installed Linux first

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >when I was dualbooting I moronicly installed Linux first
      Also done that.

  18. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >how did that happen
    yum upgrade
    that was fedora 7->8 or 6->7, don't really remember anymore

  19. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    i was extremely new to linux and had literally 0 idea what i was doing and tried to use AMD's gui graphics driver installer. I knew there were open source drivers, but i tried to play a steam game (no idea how proton worked) and thought it must be the driver. Ruined everything and reinstalled, this time reading the fricking documentation.

  20. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    happened when I installed nvidia drivers on kali a few months ago after they released version 2024.1

  21. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    tried updating CentOS7 to 8. Kernel panic on reboot. had to restore the last snapshot.

  22. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I never bricked anything but when you got weird ass X11 failures just keeping your /home/ and reinstalling was much faster than dealing with whatever happened. That said it was mostly in the distro-hopping teenager phase. Gentoo and Arch were the worst.
    I've had similar problems usually when trying "beginner friendly" distros and just not bothering trying to fix them. Just some weird ass bugs where it's easier to give up and install the Debian you're familiar with.
    I had a Debian system that went through multiple dist-upgrades without problems, but one time my sound broke. Maybe unreasonable but I got a bit mad. Fixed in an hour but still, updating your system and finding out something doesn't work is shit user experience. Once in a decade situation but still wished I could just revert to what worked and do what I wanted to do.

    Now I'm trying NixOS for the promise of always being able to revert to a working system and being able to share the same setup across computers. I was stupid and followed a popular online guide that had you subscribe to unstable-repos. Ofc KDE immediately bugged the frick out, to the point you had to hold the physical power button to shut down.

    I just want to do my shit and not care what distro it is. Debian served this purpose for a decade but it broke something once.

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