Herodotus or Thucydides?

Herodotus or Thucydides?

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  1. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Herodotus if you're into culture
    Thucydides if you're into military campaigns

  2. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    My nose looks like left dude's

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      butthole physiognomy

  3. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Why not both?

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Exactly they are both great

  4. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Xenophon

  5. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >skub or anti-skub

  6. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Thucydides by far. I really enjoyed reading Thucydides compared to Herodotus, Herodotus was just tiring to read, he rarely stays on a topic for all that long, when he does there are great parts like with Egypt and the Scythians but when he doesn't it's just meandering. Thucydides' writing has a sense of purpose and honestly I find the speeches to be great fun to read, even if by his own admission they aren't exactly real, but rather to set the mood or thoughts of the supposed speaker and listeners.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Though I admit The Peloponnesian War (by far) the better book, I don't think your break down of Herodotus is at all fair. He does build up to an orderly presentation of the Persian Wars (eventually) but by way of depicting micro cultural histories of all the surrounding peoples (as well as of the Greeks themselves), first. Thucydides' focus is more narrow; through various instances of 'city situations' and campaigning the build up is toward Athens' spectacularly disastrous loss of empire.
      Herodotus is 'comfy' reading; Thucydides among the five or so best books I have ever read.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >Herodotus is 'comfy' reading
        I never got this feeling from Herodotus. I know everyone here says that but I just felt annoyed at times reading him. Xenophons Anabasis was more of that kind of feel to me.

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          Compared to both Herodotus and Thucydides Xenophon always seems rushed, and therefore always reads, or feels, 'thin'
          I appreciate his writings as I do Anatole France's (and Voltaire's ftm) enjoyable enough but not Proust, not Flaubert.

  7. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I like how Herodotus wrote about the rise and fall of countries leading up to the second invasion by Xerxes, it read like a saga more than Thucydides as it was set up as the history of the struggle between the Greeks and the East. However, I felt more connected to the scenes of the Peloponnesian War with how Thucydides set it up with the speeches and people who lived during those times. This is tough because I enjoyed both. If I had to choose it would be Thucydides because I enjoyed how, as he mentions in the beginning, he doesn't look to religious or celestial explanations preferring causality. I think that his choosing to do that made his writing a better history and story overall.

  8. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    What should be next in the Landmark histories series? Tacitus?

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      I really wanted the Ammianus. Appian and Polybius, which is apparently for 2026, but so was Ammianus for 2024

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      I really wanted the Ammianus. Appian and Polybius, which is apparently for 2026, but so was Ammianus for 2024

      what do you like about the landmark series? I may look into buying a few.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        It's just a translation with lots of notes and maps. New Penguin editions like for Plutarch's Athenians have quite a lot of notes too but older Penguins and all Oxfords don't really have that many notes. Sometimes it's almost nothing.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Extensive maps and notes. I've often thought that most history books desperately need more maps to accompany what they're saying. Any quibbles would be with the translation, but for everything else its unambiguously the best.
        Take a look on libgen before you buy https://libgen.st/book/index.php?md5=F6D9B6FE2230D7DDBAB78D0AE8C853C7

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Landmark Plutarch would be amazing

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      It’s Polybius next then I believe Ammianus next

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Am I the only one who isn't a huge fan of these? I feel like all the maps and notes just interrupt the narratives. Maybe I'm just a snob/purist

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        No, I usually wait until the end of a paragraph to read notes then it doesn't impede the flow of the story as much. I also prize the ability of a writer when describing geography and his environment.

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          >I also prize the ability of a writer when describing geography and his environment.
          Good point, this is something I feel Herodotus does very well. Also, the more you study Greek history the better you get to know the geography so you don't need to look up where Thrace or Phrygia or Ephesus are. Maybe that's why I feel like a lot of the maps don't offer much.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        I like them. You seriously can't just keep reading when there's a map on the page?

  9. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Pleb: Thucydides
    Patrician: Herodotus
    Ascended: Pseudo-Hippocrates

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      this post was made by an ai

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        No, I am the “Airs, Waters and Places” shill also known as Jon Kolner

        The kos doctor who wrote that treatise likely was basing many of his observations off of Herodotus since they are so close in subject matter. As texts they go hand in hand.

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          can you start namegayging again

  10. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    What do you mean? Who's the better historian? What should you read?
    I think they are both worth reading since they cover different topics.
    Herodotus is more broad and one of the best primary sources about ancient Egypt and Persian-Greek wars. He reports many stories which were probably exaggerated but he always leaves its veracity to the reader.
    Thucydides narrows its book down to ancient Greece and he's the best primary source about the Peloponnesian war. Unfortunately he didn't write about the last 7 years but that was covered by Xenophon in another book.

  11. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I like them both but for different reasons. I have both in Landmark but thinking of getting them from another publisher, Landmarks are great but a little unwieldy. No clue why Everyman’s Library doesn’t have Thucydides. Anyway, I respect Thucydides more. He is more literary, more focused, gives more food for thought, but it’s more of a slog. Herodotus is like a friend at the bar. He’s more entertaining, more sprawling and digressional, has more focus on myth and folklore. I think Herodotus is better when actually reading but Thucydides has grown in my esteem after finishing him

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