How did Germanic conquerors refer to the populations of Britain, Gaul, Spain, Italy, etc? Did they call them Romans?

How did Germanic conquerors refer to the populations of Britain, Gaul, Spain, Italy, etc?

Did they call them Romans?
Did those populations identify as Roman as well?

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  1. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    Franks called the locals in Gaul romans in their law books

    • 3 months ago
      Anonymous

      Did the local already speak latin, or did they speak their old languages still?

      • 3 months ago
        Anonymous

        By that time they had been heavily latinized and definitely speaking Latin. I can't say whether or not the old language was still being spoken to any significant extent

        How come only Gallia was called "Gaul" (walhaz), but not Italy, Britain or Spain?

        Because gauls lived there, and not all celts were guals

        • 3 months ago
          Ο Σολιταίρ

          We'll never know tbh. But it's commonly assessed that Gaulish dialects may have survived in the countryside into the Merovingian era.

          The Frankish Invasion itself was the impetus for everyone speaking Latin versus Gaulish.
          Franks couldn't understand Gaulish. But many of the learned Franks knew Latin.
          Latin was maintained as an educated and legal language in Roman Gaul, but almost certainly the majority of people were bilingual in Gaulish. Especially rural populations (the majority)
          Frankish lords interacting with poor Gauls meant that Latin overtook Gaulish, finally.

          • 3 months ago
            Anonymous

            First time I've actually learned something on IQfy. Good post

          • 3 months ago
            Anonymous

            he's making it up homie

        • 3 months ago
          Anonymous

          >Because gauls lived there, and not all celts were guals
          "gaul" is a germanic word meaning celt/roman, you fricking clown

          • 3 months ago
            Anonymous

            Gaul is a roman word you moron

          • 3 months ago
            Anonymous

            holy shit, why is this misconception so common

            >gallus
            >Likely derived from Proto-Celtic *galnati (“to be able”).[1] See also Ancient Greek Γαλάτης (Galátēs), which might be from the same source.

            >gaul
            >Borrowed from French Gaule (“Gaul”), from Middle French Gaule (“Gaul”), from Old French Gaule, Waulle (“Gaul”, a term used to translate unrelated Latin Gallia (“Gaul”)), from Frankish *Walha(land) (“Gaul, Land of the Romans, foreigners”), from Proto-West Germanic *walh (“foreigner, Roman, Celt”), from Proto-Germanic *walhaz (“an outlander, foreigner, Celt”), probably of Celtic origin

      • 3 months ago
        Anonymous

        We'll never know tbh. But it's commonly assessed that Gaulish dialects may have survived in the countryside into the Merovingian era.

      • 3 months ago
        Anonymous

        There's some evidence of Gaulish being spoken into the 600sAD. Given that Gaulish words survive into modern French and English it can, albeit strenuously, be argued that Gaulish is still technically spoken today (granted, this also means that Hittite survives into every language on Earth because of "molybdenum" just being transliterated rather than translated).
        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_English_words_of_Gaulish_origin

        How come only Gallia was called "Gaul" (walhaz), but not Italy, Britain or Spain?

        *Walhaz just meant foreigner, rather it only stuck in a few places.

        • 3 months ago
          Anonymous

          It was originally used for Celts, and after the Romans took over Gaul they were also called Walhaz. It doesn't mean foreigner in general as it has never been used for any foreigners other than Celts and Romans.

      • 3 months ago
        Anonymous

        >How did Germanic conquerors refer to the populations of Britain, Gaul, Spain, Italy, etc?
        Collapse of Roman power and authority while nations in arms essentially squated in a place long enough. The Vandals did it in Africa, got a peace treaty by the authorities and as soon as Aspar left with his army took Carthage and reneged it. Italy was taken over in a coup.
        >Did they call them Romans?
        No.
        >Did those populations identify as Roman as well?
        The native ones yes.

        >Did the local already speak latin
        Yes
        >or did they speak their old languages still?
        It did exist but they were effectively extinct in most regions

  2. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    "Welsh"

    • 3 months ago
      Anonymous

      How come only Gallia was called "Gaul" (walhaz), but not Italy, Britain or Spain?

      • 3 months ago
        Anonymous

        >How come only Gallia was called "Gaul" (walhaz), but not Italy, Britain or Spain?
        Poles still call Italy by a similar word.

        • 3 months ago
          Anonymous

          To add to your point aswell, northern Italy and Spain were literally called Gaul too lol

  3. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    In Spain the Barbarian warlords used the word "villain" as an insult against locals.
    Arab rotalty and scholars meanwhile used "franks" as an insult against locals since germanic was synonym of brutish, gross, backward, barbaric across the whole islamic world.

    • 3 months ago
      Anonymous

      >In Spain the Barbarian warlords used the word "villain" as an insult against locals
      Bullshit

  4. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    homosexuals/Cucks.

  5. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    Romans.

  6. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    They called them Wahals or something like that which means foreigner in proto-Germanic

    • 3 months ago
      Anonymous

      It means foreigner but functionally means Roman because it was derived from the name of a Gallo-Roman tribe and later applied to all Romans
      If they said Walhaz they were talking about Romans

  7. 3 months ago
    Anonymous

    The terms Vlach, Walloon, and Welsh all mean foreigner but derive specifically for the word the Germanics used for the Romans based on a Gallo-Roman tribe near the frontier.

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