How did God lose to Chemosh and his iron chariots if hes all powerful, all knowing, omnipresent and omnipotent etc

How did God lose to Chemosh and his iron chariots if he’s all powerful, all knowing, omnipresent and omnipotent etc

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  1. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Judah lacked faith out of fear and lost connection with God's spirit and God couldn't work through him. You should only fear God. If he tells you he is with you then you cannot doubt your victory.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >God couldn't work through him
      Thank you

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >atheist finds his excuse to sin
        >immediately leaves
        The iron will of the godless man in action.

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          Are you talking to me?

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Yeah what are you gonna do about it big guy

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Genuinely confused what you tried to say

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Anon uses "god couldnt" in a sentence and you bolt.
            Because if theres something god cant do, then you are no longer accountable for your actions.
            You dont want to hear anything else.

            As you know - the bible makes heavy use of allegory.
            Maybe that's what a chariot of iron is. A choice. He gives us free will and with it we destroy ourselves.

            There's a psalm that basically says "let the walls of jerusalem be rebuilt. Then and then alone will sacrifices be accepted."
            The walls of jerusalem stand for your own moral fortitude. Your sacrifices dont make a difference when you dont have backbone. Because you'll sacrifice anything just to sin again.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            I'm right here what

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Are you really though? What do you think of the rest of my post?

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            "The chariot of iron is an allegory" is one of the most moronic posts ever made on this board

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Pretty sure you're just mad boi

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            No he's right, it was very dumb.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Two mad people unwilling to acknowledge a biblical passage being allegorical

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >God couldn't work through him
      Thank you

      Why was that stated in the verse? It says God was there with Judah

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        The other anon explained it well enough, Yahweh lacked the ability to buff Judah in that moment because it requires a mutual connection. He physically can't buff people unilaterally after saying he would do so.

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          Again not what it says In the book you are making it up

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      The implication here then is that God will make promises with the intention of breaking them and give no warning to the people who are about to be killed as a result. Their faith in YHWH is precisely what got them to go scorched earth on Moab and get defeated in battle consequently. Nothing else happens between YHWH making the promise to and through the prophet Elisha (who, before, during, and after was held in the esteem and grace of YHWH), sequentially fulfilling most of the promise, and failing (of which it's noted as a response to the ritualistic sacrifice of the Moabite king's son) to fulfill the last part of the promise. It should be noted that for all the problems I raise about this interpretation, it does fit an important detail of the text. That being the "great wrath (that) came upon Israel (causing them to) withdraw". The word used, קֶצֶף־, is almost always used in the context of a divine wrath. So this is either YHWH's wrath or the wrath of the Moabite patron deity, Chemosh. I'd argue though that the latter interpretation makes more sense given the Semitic cultural background and the frameworks the people of Judea, at this time, would have been operating under. It's only through a modern lens of "YHWH could not possibly be challenged in power or authority by another god" that we come up with any interpretation other than the obvious one. Alas, the hoops you would jump through to arrive to those conclusions have troubling implications in and of themselves.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >Their faith in YHWH is precisely what got them to go scorched earth on Moab and get defeated in battle consequently.
        The King of Israel was a pagan king and was not loyal to God so God was not loyal to him. Elisha didnt even want to talk to him when they came to him to consult God and he told him to go consult the pagan prophets of his parents.

        Maybe God just wanted to punish him.

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          It was not just to Jehoram that Elisha was delivering the prophecy, but also to the unnamed king of Edom and Jehoshaphat. At least a third of those forces were lead by a king who "walked in the ways" of his ancestor, king David. There's no indication that Jehoram, upon receiving the prophecy through Elisha, wasn't fully embracing the grace of YHWH and having faith that through him Moab would be delivered. So here we're left with the notion that YHWH makes promises to groups that include his devout followers, relies on the notion that the promises are to be trusted, and pulls out the rug from underneath those he's made the promise to without direct reference as to why he did it. I understand this precedes the destruction of the temple and Babylonian exile (which is pinned on the broken succession of Israel's Davidic lineage through transgressions against YHWH), but this event is particularly useful to distinguish as to whether that's the most likely interpretation. Without direct reference to causality in the case of punishment of Israel, it remains speculation. An alternative interpretation is offered that a) fits with the cultural frameworks of the people involved in the event b) doesn't presuppose later events as necessitating the earlier ones c) is corroborated through a non-biblical account (Mesha Stele) in a way that is congruent with the biblical narrative.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous
    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >God couldn't work through him
      Thank you

      >God appeals to Israel's better nature
      >they ape out anyway
      >ok then *lets them get sacked*
      >OV VEY WHY DID GOD DO THIS???!

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        To be fair it's a very tall order. Cite for example modern history.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >they lacked faith.
      I feel that this phrase is so repeated in many religions that it is the equivalent of "it tastes like chicken."

  2. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    The God you speak of is merely an illusion. He was a mortal in disguise. Chemosh, however, is a deity without a heart, an absolute and pure god! And the iron chariots were a sign of the deity’s power.

  3. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    How do you live with yourself deliberately taking Bible quotes out of context?

    Also Psalm 20:7 refutes your argument.
    "Some trust in chariots and some in horses, but we trust in the name of the LORD our God."

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Cope, what OP posted wasnt taken out of context. Your god lost to another god

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        There is only one God.

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          whatever it is, that god is not the one you worship

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Shrimp are just sea wienerroches.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        WHAT damn I really don't know the Bible. Probably because I believe all characters from the Bible and every "holy" book and religion are ancient aliens.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        The thing that's always bothered me about this take being in context, is with all the other changes that have gone into the Bible, why would they have kept it in?

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          The Old Testament was codified for the israelites by Zeus worshiping Greeks from multiple texts. There were multiple sects of Rabbis and Priests in competition, one paid the Ptolemy King to have his scribes come up with a semi-coherent textual narrative (the israelites at this time were essentially illiterate), and "The Old Testament" is the result of that. So, why is "odd line #42" still in there? Because Gregorious Yabbadabbadoupolis was being paid to write down some batch of Canaanite gibberish and that's what he was handed.

          You have to remember that each book of the Bible is just that: a unique text. Later ones reference older ones, but the older ones weren't made in anticipation of or with knowledge of what comes next. It's what the prophecies keep being wrong yet keep getting overwritten. It's just a bunch of Rabbis reinterpreting things to explain why something went wrong this time. Why is Chemosh winning in the Bible? Because it made sense at the time and they just kept stacking up bullshit that covered it over.

  4. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    All ancient priestly classes were ultimately playing the same rainmaking game. They promise to make it rain if you do what they tell you and give them what they want. If it rains, they say it's because they made it rain. If it doesn't, it's because you fricked up in some way and pissed the god or gods they claimed to represent off.

    Yahweh is always victorious. When his people win, it's because he delivered them victory. When his people lose, it's because his people fricked up in some way and he abandoned them. Every priestly class in every ancient society ran the same scam. What's remarkable is that so many people today follow Abrahamic faiths built on these Semitic con games.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Somebody is scamming you now.
      You are not immune.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        It's hiro scamming me into viewing your homosexual post.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >I know it's a scam but you probably feel for something somewhere too
        Who cares?

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      In context, it looks like Judah failed because he was at a tactical disadvantage. They fought on foot to expel their enemies from the hills, but once in the valley they were especially vulnerable to chariots. Later, Barak is encouraged by his wife that THIS time they'll defeat these people. Instead of taking her prophetic word for it, and instead of trying to do the same thing Judah did when he confronted Chemosh and trusting that God has their back this time, he brought his army to a mountain. He sought a real world tactical advantage against chariots. Thus he won.

      Judah lost because he had faith in and relied on God. Barak won because he understood that he had to create the conditions for his own success himself. If the moral and spiritual context of the story is supposed to be that success only comes to those with the greater faith and devotion, the story only indicates the very opposite of that.

      This a million times.

  5. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    He didn't.

  6. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    God only knew how to make bronze.

  7. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    So are we just all going to ignore the fact that Chemosh looks like the biblical depiction of Satan and the implication that the followers of YHWH were so booty blasted about Chemosh that they turned him into the literal Satan figure of their religion?

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >the biblical depiction of Satan
      There's no biblical depictions of Satan.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Chemosh as depicted by the Semitic cultures that worshipped/believed in him looked like the other gods in their pantheon. Which is to say that he looked pretty human. Which makes sense as the Semitic tradition (which includes early Hebrew literature and can be evidenced through Genesis) seemed to suggest gods were just a combination of knowledge and immortality.

  8. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    religion is made up as they go, like trying to play a game with a 4 year old that refuses to lose and keeps making up new rules

  9. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    You morons like to talk a lot about god but you put some scfi capeshit powers onto him. Powers which he didn't have. You merge some stupid concepcts that were never mentioned in original texts. None of them.

    God this god that. Which god? The limited angry tumblrina tier psychopath israeli one? The same that was stopped by human iron chariots? The same that has to be present in order to see israeli people sin?

    This idea of omnipotent and omnipresent supreme architect of everything has nothing to fricking do with Yahweh and Jesus. It's mind boggling how uneducated morons still asign those qualities to bumfrick desert deities that never even claimed them. Abrahamic virus has truly ruined planet Earth.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >God this god that. Which god? The limited angry tumblrina tier psychopath israeli one
      Please stop pretending this is a different god. Its a heresy.
      Nature doesnt have to be "fair". The old testament is an expression of that. Rattling off all these petty insults only makes you sound like a troony.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >petty
        >ranting
        >insults
        >troony
        So I'm Yahweh according to you?

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