How do you feel about Hermeticism?

How does IQfy feel about Hermeticism? I've been studying it for a few months so far, and I have to be completely honest, the things I've found in it have illuminated pretty much every contradiction and issue I've had with pretty much everything on every level of my life. It's like a holistic philosophical framework that, when applied to literally every aspect of life, makes everything make sense. It also, has made me into a complete and utter schizophrenic who cannot have a normal conversation without saying some shit like "the chariot of Apollo shall crash upon the mountain in a flash of moonlight, only to rise again" or some such pretentious bullshit.

Homeless People Are Sexy Shirt $21.68

The Kind of Tired That Sleep Won’t Fix Shirt $21.68

Homeless People Are Sexy Shirt $21.68

  1. 6 days ago
    Anonymous

    Cringe self-help. Read real philosophy not some pop garbage you found in the spirituality section of a book store.

    • 6 days ago
      Anonymous

      Isn't hermeticism like, the origin point of the entire western canon of philosophy? Hermeticism influenced plato after all, which is something VERY obvious by his framework.

      • 6 days ago
        Anonymous

        >Hermeticism influenced plato after all
        No it didn't. Plato lived around 500 years before the first Hermetic texts were written.

        • 6 days ago
          Anonymous

          The Hermetic texts themselves were written in the 2nd and 3rd centuries CE, but they were part of a broader Hellenistic milieu that included influences from earlier Greek philosophy, Egyptian religion, and other ancient Near Eastern traditions actually. The truth is we have no fricking idea where or when hermeticism actually came from, just by merit of how long ago the ideas were being passed around. the Egyptian god Thoth and the Greek god Hermes, who contributed to the mythos of Hermes Trismegistus, were worshipped long before Plato, and their syncretism in the form of Hermes trismigestus existed before him as well.

          • 6 days ago
            Anonymous

            >CE

          • 6 days ago
            Anonymous

            That's like saying that we don't know when christianity started because we fon't know the exact age of the cult of the storm god that later became the israeli elohim

        • 6 days ago
          Anonymous

          This

          Plato came first. Platonism and neoplatonism however, likely evolved ALONGSIDE hermeticism.

          • 6 days ago
            Anonymous

            >Platonism and neoplatonism
            Can someone suggest books about these schools of thought?

        • 6 days ago
          Anonymous

          >No it didn't. Plato lived around 500 years before the first Hermetic texts were written

          Because they were recorded at that time does not mean they arose at that time. The Homeric epics are far older than we can date because of the oral tradition of knowledge transfer.

    • 6 days ago
      Anonymous

      It’s too academic for new-agers and not academic enough for academia. Perfect for IQfygays

    • 6 days ago
      Anonymous

      People really don't seem to recognize the fact that Hermeticism really is just self-help with occult larp imagery. It can be fine if that's all your looking for but "hermeticism" as a detailed interest is for schizos.

  2. 6 days ago
    Anonymous

    It's very interesting from a personal/spiritual standpoint for reasons other anons have mentioned - as far as esoteric traditions go, this one has a great deal of explicit overlap with the basic philosophical topoi, specifically the doctrines of an invisible second world, the mind witnessing spiritual forms, etc.

  3. 6 days ago
    Anonymous

    I can't get into it. Seems like a bunch of new age nonsense. What do you find compelling about it?

    • 6 days ago
      Anonymous

      Well, it's kind of a philosophy unto itself really. It teaches you how to understand the machine that makes the universe tick. For example, politics. the masculine aspects present in the political right, and the feminine aspects present in the political left, how they bounce off of each other, how they develop in a dialectical sense, ultimately unifying into a single thing that is both neither of it's two parts and better than both of them.

      • 6 days ago
        Anonymous

        This sort of thing annoys me. Most of the time, using poetic language to describe things like that is at best too vague to be really useful, and at worst is used to deliberately mislead.

        • 6 days ago
          Anonymous

          A pretty feminine response. You voted for Biden and like sticking things in your butt.

          • 6 days ago
            Anonymous

            Agent of Apollo detected. You shall burn in the flames of your chariot as the moon rises.

          • 6 days ago
            Anonymous

            Is this simple shitposting or do you really not feel embarrassed when you post this cringe? I can't tell anymore and I'm all for censoring keywords relating to USA politics, at least on off topic boards.

        • 6 days ago
          Anonymous

          maybe it's a taste thing. i kinda prefer it, I find that symbolic language can translate more profound ideas. Then again I'm literally insane so take that as you will.

        • 6 days ago
          Anonymous

          When the vocabulary you need doesn't exist, a resort to allegory is inevitable. How else can you describe the ineffable?

          • 6 days ago
            Anonymous

            If you can't explain it in simple terms, you don't understand it. Allegory makes rhetorical sleight of hand too easy. It allows you to decouple your logic from the reality you are trying to describe.

            >X is similar to Y
            >Y has properties A, B, and C
            >Therefore X also has properties A, B, and C
            >No, I don't need to actually show how real object X has any of these properties

          • 6 days ago
            Anonymous

            You can't explain it in simple terms, or at all, if the requisite words haven't been invented.
            Look at Jung's work. He had to invent a whole lexicon of psychological terms because no suitable vocabulary existed. It's part of the reason why Jung remains incomprehensible to many people, even today.

          • 6 days ago
            Anonymous

            Then create new, specific, well-defined terms and explain them clearly. Using allegory or abusing existing (or even worse, anthropomorphizing) terms only confuses the issue.

          • 6 days ago
            Anonymous

            That's what Jung tried to do, and as mentioned, it still eludes people today.
            Some things can't be described in words with any kind of accuracy. Drug trips, religious experiences, even everyday things like scents, tastes and colours.

          • 6 days ago
            Anonymous

            Maybe Jung was just a schizo lunatic and his ideas aren't useful.

            I don't know anything about drug trips or religious experiences, but there are whole industries dedicated to accurate description of scents, colors, and tastes.

          • 6 days ago
            Anonymous

            >Maybe Jung was just a schizo lunatic and his ideas aren't useful.
            Maybe you haven't read him and are full of shit.
            >there are whole industries dedicated to accurate description of scents, colors, and tastes
            Yep, you're full of shit.

          • 6 days ago
            Anonymous

            If his ideas cannot be explained to mere mortals, then they are not useful.

            >sensory input is just impossible to describe!
            lel

            >accurate description of scents, colors, and tastes
            How would you describe "redness" to a blind person, anon?

            Red corresponds to a range of wavelengths of electromagnetic radiation, roughly around 700 nm.

          • 6 days ago
            Anonymous

            If he can express his ideas sufficiently for others to grasp them, however tenuously, then they are useful.
            A specific EM wavelength tells us nothing about redness. It's a quale that can only be experienced.

          • 6 days ago
            Anonymous

            >If he can express his ideas sufficiently for others to grasp them, however tenuously, then they are useful.

            You keep mentioning how he failed to do this.

            >A specific EM wavelength tells us nothing about redness.
            You asked about redness, not the experience of seeing. Furthermore, I object to the analogy you are trying to draw between 'explaining color to the blind', and explaining philosophical ideas to other people. Are you suggesting that the majority of people lack a necessary sense or mental faculty? If so, what sort of faculty? What does it allow them to know about the world that the rest of us do not?

            >"Red corresponds to a range of wavelengths of electromagnetic radiation, roughly around 700 nm."
            >Blind Perspon: Ah, I see...

            Now describe infraredness.

          • 6 days ago
            Anonymous

            >You keep mentioning how he failed to do this
            No, mentioned how "Jung remains incomprehensible to many people."
            >You asked about redness, not the experience of seeing.
            That wasn't me, but redness and the experience of seeing are inseparable.
            Nothing is objectively red, it's a quality preceived by the human brain.

          • 6 days ago
            Anonymous

            >"Red corresponds to a range of wavelengths of electromagnetic radiation, roughly around 700 nm."
            >Blind Perspon: Ah, I see...

          • 6 days ago
            Anonymous

            *person

          • 6 days ago
            Anonymous

            This dude looked up the wavelength of red and really thought “this will show ‘em.”

          • 6 days ago
            Anonymous

            >accurate description of scents, colors, and tastes
            How would you describe "redness" to a blind person, anon?

      • 6 days ago
        Anonymous

        >the masculine aspects present in the political right
        lol
        lmao

        • 6 days ago
          Anonymous

          >the left literally whitecapes for trannies and gays

  4. 6 days ago
    Anonymous

    i think if you're going to do it you need to splash for the full rubber seals and get thick handblown glass and heavy duty lids. you need to boil everything and not touch it with your bare hands during the actual filling process. even then you're gonna get some growth 5-6 months in if you don't store it at a correct temperature with minimal light, let's be honest do you have a stone cellar because if you don't why are we even playing around here, you're going to give your whole family botulism and not the nice kind that makes your face shiny and smooth.

  5. 6 days ago
    Anonymous

    My brother-in-law is really into Hermeticism. Seems like Middle Platonism filtered through a bunch of schizo nonsense tbh.

    • 6 days ago
      Anonymous

      That's exactly what it is. It's literally schizophrenic neoplatonism for homosexuals and insane people and people who like William Blake

      • 6 days ago
        Anonymous

        Willaim Blake is peak schizo, though.

  6. 6 days ago
    Anonymous

    Works well with panentheism, which I'm a fan of.

  7. 6 days ago
    Anonymous

    OP what are your fav hermeticism books, what you're reading currently, what you plan to read, and throughout your venture into esotericism, what enlightened you the most.

    • 6 days ago
      Anonymous

      Right now I'm actually reading From Hell by Alan moore (inb4 "hurr sure comics hurr) for it's hermetic ideas, which are really interesting because he takes the entirety of the 19th century england and he uses hermeticism to highlight and analyze the era holistically. The most "enlightening" hermetic book I've ever read though was, hilariously, IT by Stephen King (yea yea frick you too). That book influenced me a lot when I was younger and gave me an outlook that was very obsessed with the idea of righteous rebellion, being alone on an island with your best friends and standing against the world, but now that I'm older, I've re-read it and understand that the book is more about the things created by the clas between trauma and rebellion, instead of the rebellion itself. Which lead me down different paths and turned me into the man I am today. It was an extremely "alchemical" experience.

  8. 6 days ago
    Anonymous

    Why are you guys talking "Hermeticism" when you mean Freemasonry?

  9. 6 days ago
    Anonymous

    The separation of the religious from the scientific was a temporary necessity extended by Church dogma. It is a necessary element in the life of the Western Mind and a lens on the mysticism and spirituality of the ancients. One's disposition or 'feels' regarding it are irrelevant. On the negative end, one may as well just read Plotinus and Porphyry, and Ficino's commentaries, it's largely derivative thereof.

  10. 6 days ago
    Anonymous

    it's just gnosticism at half-mast. not that interesting

  11. 6 days ago
    Anonymous

    AAAAAAAAAAHHHHHHHHHHH

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *