How does my autonomic nervous system know my hands are wet?

How does my autonomic nervous system know my hands are wet?

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  1. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    magic

  2. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    magic

  3. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    it knows because they aren't dry

  4. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    magic, probably

  5. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I'm a qualified dermatologist and can confirm that it is magic

  6. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    How do YOU know your hands are wet?
    Magic probably.

  7. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    it doesn't. that's just magicians tricking you into thinking you have wet hands.

  8. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    God updates wirelessly

  9. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    i got a circumsized penis to regrow its veins ... is it safe?

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous
  10. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    well, you see, I don't personally know the answer but I have faith that some esteemed natural scientist has empirical evidence explaining why it isn't caused directly by God's all-loving personal intervention.

  11. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    would this still happen if you couldn't feel?

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Supposedly a boy with nerve damage in his hand wouldn't get wrinkly on the fingers he couldn't feel.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        there are studies on this, and it has been confirmed that patients with nerve damage do not experience wrinkling. the mainstream accepted hypothesis is, i kid you not, traction - an adaptation to improve grip strength under water.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          but this does not address OPs question, which is how the nervous system detects water to begin with

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            imagine thinking the OP was real to begin with

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            But I was being serious. The nerves tell the hands to decrease circulation to the hands/feet, which causes them to wrinkle. I know it's not the thermoreceptors that do it, because it works the same in hot or cold water, so it must be something else.

            Best educated guess is it's not measuring contact with water, but measuring how much water your skin is perspiring or exhaling. Put on some rubber gloves that don't breath well and you'll get the same prune fingers. Perhaps it's possible the fingertips are so sensitive it's the only part of the body capable of sensing water loss in this way.

            >Put on some rubber gloves that don't breath well and you'll get the same prune fingers
            When I've done that my hands prune, but they're also really sweaty. I always thought it was because the hands are soaking in trapped sweat that it wrinkles.

            that sounds reasonable, thank you. OP, there's an answer for you. now please respond and say thank you.

            thanks

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            Best educated guess is it's not measuring contact with water, but measuring how much water your skin is perspiring or exhaling. Put on some rubber gloves that don't breath well and you'll get the same prune fingers. Perhaps it's possible the fingertips are so sensitive it's the only part of the body capable of sensing water loss in this way.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            that sounds reasonable, thank you. OP, there's an answer for you. now please respond and say thank you.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          >mainstream accepted hypothesis is, i kid you not, traction - an adaptation to improve grip strength under water.
          What else would it be you tardo

  12. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    how does your nervous system recognize sounds as "fluid", tones as "warm", "cold" etc.? what are you really asking? are you a person, am I a voice in your mind? have you lost my marbles?

  13. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    it's a combination of receptors in your brain and skin telling your blood vessels to constrict. you have receptors in your skin and blood vessels that detect changes like chemoreceptors, so it's most likely through a combination of those. probably, I took A&P II and didn't learn about this shit.

  14. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    The same way your brain knows your hands are wet.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Does my brain know when my brain is dry?

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        why do you think your brain is wrinkled

  15. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Used to get this all the time as a kid but I don't think I do anymore.

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