how many books do you guys read a year? do you hit your goals?

how many books do you guys read a year? do you hit your goals?

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  1. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >how many books do you guys read a year?
    About 100
    >do you hit your goals?
    My goal was to stop skimming and remember what I read, so no

  2. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    about 10 pages of 100 books

  3. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I've read two so far this year and am working through two more right now. Even if I slow pace a little bit during the summer when I'm more likely to go

    [...]

    side I'll probably still hit the one-book-a-month pace I've set for myself.

  4. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Usually I only read 20 books a year but they’re all nonfiction

  5. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    that image made me laugh, op, thanks 🙂

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      that image made me cry because i have wasted four years of my life 🙁

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Why have u wasted them?

  6. 1 month ago
    Anonymous
  7. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    about 50 last year, probably less this year as I picked a few door stoppers.

  8. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I pick 30 as a minimum. Usually end up around 40-50 a year.

  9. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Not really keeping track at all, but I would guess 20 fiction books and a few chapters from around 100 non-fiction books.

  10. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I'd say around 20 and another 10 that I start but don't finish for some reason.

  11. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    150. I’ve exceeded the goal recent years.
    >abloohoo that’s impossible
    >waaaah muh retention
    Practice makes perfect. Cut out your timewasting podcasts, tv, doomscroll, social media shit. What did that ever do for you? Suddenly you have hours free every single day. You’ll read faster and faster with practice. You’ll also know more and more.
    I can guarantee you that if you read 100 history books from the outside in model you’ll spend a lot of time repeating the same facts even though you read different books. Same thing with popular science, literary criticism, psychology, biology, pick a field. Nearly all books, even advanced level books and beyond, don’t trust you to have read a book prior to that one, and so recapitulate the same things. Suddenly all those 300 page books have only 200 pages or less of actual novel content.
    Beyond this level you’re reading journals directly anyway.

    I find the same pattern in fiction reading, anything formulaic will become intolerable because you know exactly how they all go after a certain number of books.

    All of which is to say do not despair over reading few books, it’s a cumulative race over time. If you’re serious about reading more there’s often lifestyle changes that can be made. This is about as popular as telling people to eat less and go to the gym to stop being fat so I expect nothing but seethe.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      I probably have hyperlexia, and can say you don't need to read many published books when encyclopedias exist. I only buy physical books to get more of a deep dive into a specific topic that particularly interests me, or if they're biographies. You can also read articles or research papers about specific topics that interest you. I have a decent knowledge of herbs using this method. My main topic is philosophy though. I explained Plato's Theory of Forms to a coworker once, and he understood it easily. I think that shows mastery of the concept. I don't read fiction as it's a waste of time, and reading speed isn't really a useful metric. Like I've read books on Tai-Chi and meditation practices, so I spend time doing those practices. If you just read to learn without actually putting it into practice then you're basically playing cookie clicker but with books.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        > deep dive into a specific topic that particularly interests me, or if they're biographies
        > If you just read to learn without actually putting it into practice
        I now invite you to make your tortured explanation of how you put reading biographies “into practice”. Please remember other people have actually read biographies so don’t try lying about what’s in them.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          I've read a book about a Chinese man named Li Qingyun recently. He is notable for supposedly living to around 200 years of age due to spiritual practices, a physical lifestyle in the mountains, and daily consumption of herbs. I went out and bought the herbs he listed which were Fo-Ti, Huang Jing, and Baiji. I already had taken Goji Berry daily before reading his book, even though he mentions that one as well. I have much more energy day to day with them. I'm eating less while moving more weight in the gym because of these herbs. I even gave a month's supply to a coworker as she was complaining about a problem that one of the herbs could alleviate. I will probably start practicing the same spiritual practices as well in the future. This would of course eat into 'reading time', but will add to longevity which will add more total time to my life. Keep in mind the less time spent eating and preparing food is more time to read and exercise.

          Another Biography I read is called 'The Magus of Java'. After reading what was in the book I followed the meditation practices outlined, and have had experiences with the chi, or bio-energy, to such a degree that I will probably learn Chinese sometime down the road in order to properly learn NeiGong and NeiKung from an authentic teacher in mainland China.

          Both books put into perspective that what we in the West might deem 'impossible' is different from what those in the East might deem 'impossible'. For instance, there are ancient Chinese stories of princesses traveling to the moon. We in the West have actually travelled there. Would it be wise for the people in the East to write off our accomplishment simply because they have mythos of similar feats? Using this logic I think it would be wise to not write off their accomplishments.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            So first you pick biographies that seem to slot more into self help, then assert that the practice you gained was mostly in following their mumbo jumbo and believing it.
            Which would still make the vast majority of what these biographies could detail an utter waste of time by your own standard. But then how would you know what they contained before reading them and if anything would be applicable to your life? You couldn’t of course. Say you read some guru preaching about drinking cow piss and like the gullible idiot you are you swilled some of Saar’s Best and found it didn’t do anything.
            Did your investment of reading time retroactively become worthless since the cow piss benefits did not materialize?
            Consequently when you wake up in 10 years and realize you wasted a fortune and hundreds of hours on eastern delusions will reading biographies be the worst time investment you ever made?

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            They're not self help. They're in the philosophy category. I knew they had useful information by reading descriptions and reviews of the books beforehand. This is how I of course could know they have relevant information. Just because you're not knowledgeable and prejudiced about anything Eastern doesn't mean other people are. You think it's me being gullible, but you probably have never spent longer than 30 minutes in one meditation session. So of course you wouldn't 'believe' in the benefits. Herbs are commonly known to have health benefits too. There's numerous research papers on each herb you could read yourself. Equating herbs to cow piss is the mark of an immature and prejudiced mind. I will probably wake up in 10 years with twice as much vigor as you since I actually exercise daily, and have never wasted my time on podcasts and social media like you stated you have in your post. Also, your 150 books read in a year isn't even an impressive claim. One of my personal friends in the past would read one book each day. She was IQ tested to be around 155. You should probably study Theory of Mind before coming in with so many preconceived notions.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          I've read a book about a Chinese man named Li Qingyun recently. He is notable for supposedly living to around 200 years of age due to spiritual practices, a physical lifestyle in the mountains, and daily consumption of herbs. I went out and bought the herbs he listed which were Fo-Ti, Huang Jing, and Baiji. I already had taken Goji Berry daily before reading his book, even though he mentions that one as well. I have much more energy day to day with them. I'm eating less while moving more weight in the gym because of these herbs. I even gave a month's supply to a coworker as she was complaining about a problem that one of the herbs could alleviate. I will probably start practicing the same spiritual practices as well in the future. This would of course eat into 'reading time', but will add to longevity which will add more total time to my life. Keep in mind the less time spent eating and preparing food is more time to read and exercise.

          Another Biography I read is called 'The Magus of Java'. After reading what was in the book I followed the meditation practices outlined, and have had experiences with the chi, or bio-energy, to such a degree that I will probably learn Chinese sometime down the road in order to properly learn NeiGong and NeiKung from an authentic teacher in mainland China.

          Both books put into perspective that what we in the West might deem 'impossible' is different from what those in the East might deem 'impossible'. For instance, there are ancient Chinese stories of princesses traveling to the moon. We in the West have actually travelled there. Would it be wise for the people in the East to write off our accomplishment simply because they have mythos of similar feats? Using this logic I think it would be wise to not write off their accomplishments.

          So first you pick biographies that seem to slot more into self help, then assert that the practice you gained was mostly in following their mumbo jumbo and believing it.
          Which would still make the vast majority of what these biographies could detail an utter waste of time by your own standard. But then how would you know what they contained before reading them and if anything would be applicable to your life? You couldn’t of course. Say you read some guru preaching about drinking cow piss and like the gullible idiot you are you swilled some of Saar’s Best and found it didn’t do anything.
          Did your investment of reading time retroactively become worthless since the cow piss benefits did not materialize?
          Consequently when you wake up in 10 years and realize you wasted a fortune and hundreds of hours on eastern delusions will reading biographies be the worst time investment you ever made?

          this is one schizophrenic person replying to himself

  12. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Actually made me giggle
    >10 books in a WHOLE year
    lol lmao even

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >Moby Dick
      >Ulysses
      >Gravity's Rainbow
      >2666
      >The Bible
      >Shakepeare's entire plays
      >The Very Hungry Caterpillar
      >The Red Book
      >Call of the Crocodile
      >Bottom's Dream

  13. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    30. I don't really have an goal, so no I guess.

  14. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I've already read more this year than last.
    Last year
    >The Stranger, camus
    >Some gay YA novel a female friend suggested
    >Anthony Bourdain's book
    >A Chefs Tale, interesting history of french cooking trade / biography of a world renowned french chef
    >attempted to read nietzsche (genealogy of morals), heavily filtered me
    This year
    >1984
    >Picture of Dorian Gray
    >Dream interpretation, Freud
    >1/3 of brothers karamazov (taking my time and savoring this one, seems worth it)
    >meditations, aurelius
    >Invisible man, Wells
    Im a new litgay so this year is going great. Plan on reading all of Dosto and studying a couple psychology textbooks this year but at this rate I might be able to add some more. Thinking about dipping my toes into theology a bit before philosophy. I want to read divine comedy beyond inferno which I read as a kid but I want to read the bible first too.

    Tried reading Prince, machievelli and ethics, plato on my phone. Realized I don't want to read philosophy on my phone and also I want to read philosophy in a more structured way than I have been so I'll buy those physically and shelf 'em for later

  15. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Platon Republic is too hard for me

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      try Plankton Republic

  16. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    it depends
    the last 5 years i was able to get 2 books a year due to other constraints
    hopefully this year I'll break those trends by having more books read and reviewed.

    hopefully to have at least 2 books read by May

  17. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    25-50 in recent years. Lots of long ones. 15 this year.

  18. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    15-25 cover-to-cover, 20-50% of 5-10 more, and random chunks of about 50. For Goodreads I only count cover-to-covers (no audiobooks).

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      what makes you put a book down after ~half or less of it? What makes you finish it? Feel like sometimes I'm forcing myself to finish books

  19. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    -5

  20. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    40. Most of them are not very long, 350 pages, more or less. I try to read 50 pages per day at minimum.

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