How would a mesh style helmet have performed on a medieval battlefield?

How would a mesh style helmet have performed on a medieval battlefield?

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  1. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Depends on the thickness of the mesh.

  2. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    the worst
    you would do far better with a chainmail coif and helm, the mesh isn't going to stop arrows

    fencing gear isn't weighted to kill and maim, although catastrophic injuries and deaths due to sword breakage happen

    see a fine pointed slender weapon like a regulation fencing sword could potentially slip through the mail and marr, which is why the tight knit mesh faceguard is vital for the sport of fencing

    sport isn't battle, chainmail and gambison was popular for a good reason

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Nevermind arrows. Imagine wearing that thing and facing a knight with a morningstar or a pikeman.

  3. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    horribly. But something as simple as aluminum bats would have been god tier to them.
    >lightweight
    >durable
    >strong enough to bludgeon someone
    >nearly impossible to rust and highly resistant to corrosion

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >aluminum bats

      they fold immediately to the average axe handle, lets just say made of hickory

      they had axe handles, which are better than bats for what you are describing

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      You should work in Washington DC anon. This reminds me of this story a Vietnam vet told me. Many of the first combat knives issued then were stainless, and the barely trained men using them didn't know until they very quickly broke during trench fighting. Later these were replaced with carbon steel but just imagine that, your life as a modern soldier is in the hands of actual morons who make decisions on what you'll carry and likely face no serious consequences for making you carry something like a worthless stainless steel combat knife.

      Aluminum of any sort is a terrible choice. Anything with a high chromium content is shit for war unless it's like a gun frame, which, they are beautiful imo like the pt-92. I would carry that just because of how good it looks. Anyway you may get a few good uses out of that bat against someone but a club made of wood or better, cased in metal or filled with lead on the inside end would actually be useful. Such clubs worked against armored knights well, that and strong enough long bows and tight formations with pikes are the few poverty options that will actually work against heavy armored foes of the Middle ages. Some autist with an aluminum bat would be crow feed in no time.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >"you're at the mercy of the cheapest bidder"
        Remember that.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >You should work in Washington DC anon
        What a creative way of calling someone moronic.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Aluminum has a low density moron. Thats what makes it bad at whacking stuff.

  4. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    now a collapsable baton is another story

    they get kind of mental

  5. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    like I don't want to burst your bubble but a bronze macehead will outpreform an aluminum bat for millenia

  6. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Mesh like that would be fricking worthless.

    There were a few renaissance-era helmets based on the idea of mesh, but the ratio of metal to holes is much higher.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      how would pic related stand up to a warhammer?

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        It's shaped to deflect, so depends on the angle. A full blow would be lethal, an angled strike could be survivable with at least a concussion and whiplash.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Something I have wondered about is a person's ability to see well enough to have a good 'situational awareness' during a battle. I realize that the narrow slit on a helm is necessary for protection but wouldn't a row of small holes just above the slit allow for greater visibility? As long as structural integrity isn't compromised this design seems to be more desirable.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Having extra holes above the eye slot wouldn't be very helpful in most instances. How often does a knight need to look upwards? Usually, he'd be on horseback looking at people below him, or on foot looking at people at the same level as him.

        The only situation where a knight would likely have guys above him would be if he was assaulting a castle wall, in which case he'd absolutely not want any holes on the upper part of his helmet, since arrows would be raining down heavily on him and even a small hole on a surface being struck with arrows can permit splinters to get in his eyes.

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          back at chu
          Knights never fought on foot? I just thought you would give you an idea of what was headed your way, as in a sword blade or ax descending from in front of you. I guess if there are no examples of this kind of design then it couldn't have been that great an idea. Just thinking outloud.

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          Knights do need to breathe and cool off and when you're feeling all sweaty and horrible, that extra airflow would feel like a gift from heaven.

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