I am starting with the greeks, the iliad to be specific, but I don't want to get stuck reading 50 books of greek philosophy before ever moving fo...

I am starting with the greeks, the iliad to be specific, but I don't want to get stuck reading 50 books of greek philosophy before ever moving forward
Give me 2 or 3 books that give me the gist of it so I can just go ahead and read more modern stuff.
I have already read the symposium and I have a copy of the republic

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  1. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous
    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      This chart (well, the normal-sized one) is terrible it has you reading bumfrick boring shit like Edith Hamilton's Mythology before doing anything else. Listen homosexuals, you don't need to read in any order. Just read what you are interested in instead of forcing yourself to wade through 300 pages of turgid boring Wikipedia "explanations" of Greek mythology before reading Plato or whatever it is you ACTUALLY want to read. All the stuff you "need" to know you will just accumulate passively over time by engaging with the ancients, and if you're really stuck on something you can just Google it. Christian scholars in the Dark Ages couldn't read all this shit in order because they didn't have access to most of it. Who cares? They just engaged with the texts they did have and were interested in. You can also afford to be choosy about which works by famous people you read. Don't feel like you need to just stick to the MOST IMPORTANT CANONICAL STUFF(!!!!!!!). Augustine's whole life was changed by a reading of Cicero's Hortensius (which is completely lost to us now) and Aelred of Rievaulx based his whole philosophy of friendship off of Cicero's De Amicitia, which I think is the only work by Cicero he ever read.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >Dark Ages
        stopped reading

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          I mean it purely in a chronological sense

  2. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Okay.
    Homer:
    >Iliad
    >Odyssey
    Plato:
    >Gorgias (And Meno if you can)
    >Statesman
    >Republic (Theory)
    >Laws (Praxis)
    Aristotle:
    >Athenian Constitution (Optional, but it greatly improves your historical knowledge)
    >Ethics
    >Politics
    This should get you the bare minimum knowledge. Do not engage in discussions about Platonic Forms, though.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      No aristotle's metaphysics?

  3. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Read Philosophy in the Tragic Age of the Greeks if you want an idea what Greek philosophy was like before Plato subverted Greek thinking. The Iliad will give you a better idea what Greek thinking was like more so than Plato, because Plato was antagonistic to Greek life and thinking. Their philophers like Thales, Anaximander, and Parmenides would give you a better idea of what a Greek thinker thought during their vital / colonizing periods.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Plato isn't quintessential for Greeks. You'll probably get more of a misunderstanding about their mindset from him, by the time platonic thought was widespread in Greece they were subjugated by the Macedonians.

      You should read Pindar's Pythian Odes, older philosophers like Thales/Anaximander/Parmenides, read the Hesiod, and read biographies of famous Greeks by Plutarch. My favorite is Plutarch's account of Archimedes.

      But isn't Plato important to get to modern philosophy?

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Plato is super important for modern philosophy, but thinking he represents ancient Greek men (pre Prince Philip of Macedon's conquest) isn't accurate. Most of the famous Greeks and really interesting Greek periods are prior to Plato.

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          Yeah but I read the greeks more as a basis to try to tackle modern philosophy than anything else, hence why I jumped straight to Plato.
          I am reading the Iliad to have a taste of normal greek stuff but I am not trying to delve into their world right now (I find it very interesting, don't get me wrong, I am just not focused on that goal this period)

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Read Plato, but also pick up Philosophy in the Tragic Age of the Greeks. It's an easy / short read and will give you a great understanding of early Greek philosophers like Thales, Anaximander, Parmenides, and even Heraclitus

          • 2 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            If you just want to prepare for modern philosophy, then Plato and some Aristotle is the minimum. But that's pretty minimal, it wouldn't hurt to get at least a summary of the pre-socratic and later Hellenistic philosophers. However, you don't need any literature to understand philosophy. Although you'd be missing out on good reading and culture and not being a pleb.

  4. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Plato isn't quintessential for Greeks. You'll probably get more of a misunderstanding about their mindset from him, by the time platonic thought was widespread in Greece they were subjugated by the Macedonians.

    You should read Pindar's Pythian Odes, older philosophers like Thales/Anaximander/Parmenides, read the Hesiod, and read biographies of famous Greeks by Plutarch. My favorite is Plutarch's account of Archimedes.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Why do you think Pindar is important?

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        It shows Greek psychology towards competition, which ends up being the foundation of their fame / glory / κλέος seeking and many of their idiosyncratic personalities/and great men can be said to have held those things in very high regard. Pindar also preserves old form poetry and many ancient myths that we only have fragments of like in his poem where he talks about the birth of Yamus. Pindar should be read by anyone interested in the Greek classics.

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          Thank you. I’ve read him, but never found much value in his works, esp. in comparison to Theocritus, whom I read around the same time.

  5. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Just time travel to ancient greece.
    Its better than reading the books.
    You should try it.

  6. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Depends why you are reading the Greeks. If it's for entertainment, you don't need to read the philosophy, perhaps just the Symposium because it's an easy and short one.

    I would recommend reading a brief overview of Greek mythology before the Iliad and Odyssey which both start in media res and assume you know what the Trojan War is all about and will get all the mythological allusions.

  7. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Homer is just ancient capeshit.

  8. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >but I don't want to get stuck reading 50 books of greek philosophy before ever moving forward
    yes you actually do

  9. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    These are the authors you need to read. After them, you can try reading Plato and Aristotle. And anyone who says otherwise is a homosexual.
    - Homer
    - Thucydides
    - Herodotus
    - Aeschylus
    - Sophocles
    - Euripides
    - Pindar
    - Aristophanes

  10. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >Homer
    >Sophocles
    >Ovid
    >Virgil
    then you could skip to Dante if you really want to move quick

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >Greeks
      >Ovid
      >Virgil

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        he said he wanted to move quickly on to more modern

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          that's bullshit but i believe it

  11. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    The canon isn’t for you if you can’t read 36 platonic dialogues.

  12. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >start my day off with the Greeks

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Chad reader vs weak "where is my s-shortcut?"

  13. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Definition of ngmi sorry buddy

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