I can't tell if it's depressing or strangely uplifting.

I can't tell if it's depressing or strangely uplifting.

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  1. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Why not both?

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      I guess that's the point. I find it more depressing though.
      Even a "good life" that's out of reach for many of us modern young men seems bleak when put to paper

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        I think it's about there being a quiet dignity and depth in a mediocre life. What's depressing is that by modern standards his life is pretty darn good.

  2. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I bet you praise him here but if you met a IRL stoner, and got fricked like a b***h for nothing, you would whistle a different tune. Remember that Walker had to go, and what it means for a student.
    Stop pitying the self important freak rn.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Walker? Do you mean the homosexual mostly likely buying favors from Lomax with anal? You're either trolling, braindead, or sucking/sucked your professor's wiener for more credit.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >buying favors from Lomax with anal
        Who started this meme? There isnt even a slight hint to this in the book.
        Its cause they are both cripples and Lomax is kind off a weird, seething autist whose name sounds like something out of a northern European childrens tale anyway

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          So you're special? Awww, sorry about that bud. good luck out there, it's a harsh world.

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Not being a homosexual projecting his catamite-daddy fetish onto everything is certainly a big relief.

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >homosexual projecting his catamite-daddy fetish
            Not, but it's still much better than being a homosexual subtly promoting his crippled-catamite x crippled-daddy fetish. Very clever, but I noticed your tricks from a mile away.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        I never saw anyone post about it and I got that impression reading the book. I sort of remember stoner’s friend asking what was going on between those two and stoner said something like “I don’t even want to know”

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          I read that as "It doesnt matter anyway", Lomax was being a sperg, the ultimate reason was left open for the reader to fill in but there is no hint to homosexualry and it would be really out of place too.

          >homosexual projecting his catamite-daddy fetish
          Not, but it's still much better than being a homosexual subtly promoting his crippled-catamite x crippled-daddy fetish. Very clever, but I noticed your tricks from a mile away.

          Yeah I am sure Walkers deformed cripple bussy was worth kicking up a fuss with the dean over lol

  3. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    very depressing. he let his wife ruin the things he loved. his office, his relationship with his daughter, and he just let it happen like a b***h pussy. He life would have been better spent as cannon fodder in the trenches. LOMAX RULES

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      I felt like this book was ultimately pointless. Maybe that was the point. Don't be a Stoner.

      I see it as a manual on how not to live.

      Agreed on all these, basically what I was getting at with

      Been a while since I read it, but it's just depressing for me. I think it's a good book, as far as it tells a particular story well, but I don't understand this common perception of it as some sort of celebration of "an ordinary life". Stoner is an abject failure of a person, and it's all down to his own choices. He makes the decision not to go and fight for his country, fair enough maybe, but it's one of the first examples of him taking the easier road to avoid discomfort, and it heralds a pattern that he will follow throughout the rest of his life. He then latches onto a woman who is clearly damaged and likely to be no good as a wife, and for some reason marries her. Another decision that is maybe understandable, but once again reinforces his nonconfrontational and weak personality. Critically, he has the opportunity to go for a position (head of English, if i recall correctly) and passes on it. The man who gets the position then becomes his superior and later takes a dislike to him. Instead of making an effort to either reconcile or actually improve his lot by getting help from his friend who runs the overall department, he just does nothing and lets things run their course, damning himself to a mediocre teaching position. He has a child and forms a strong bond with her, but then does nothing when his lunatic wife decides to take control of the child and ruins her confidence, setting her up for a horrible future. Even when he reflects on his daughter years later, after she has become an alcoholic waster, all he can reflect is "at least she has the alcohol." Even his affair ends pathetically. He has the option to escape all of the drabness and mediocrity of his life with a woman who genuinely loves and respects him, and he chooses not to with the most cope-laden excuse he could have : "it probably won't work out", as if his life was already any good.
      He only does three things of note that show any backbone in the novel: pursuing his passion by switching from farming science to English lit, challenging his rival by teaching his course the way he wants, and publishing a mediocre book. The second of those is framed as some sort of great act of rebellion on his part, but in the context of all the awful failings and inaction in his life it rings hollow and only further accentuates how weak he is and how pathetic the hill he decided to die on was. Stoner probably never would have been a great man, but he could have been someone with a good life, highly regarded in his field, and with a happy family and children. Or he could have salvaged a life with a get out free card and went to live with the woman who actually loved him. At every point he fails to act to make any of this happen, and most of the time for almost no reason. It's a tragedy of the most banal and awful kind, which is what makes it an interesting novel. But nothing about it is life affirming or worth feeling good about unless it's seen as a cautionary tale about seizing life

  4. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    The dude who did the Star Wars music wrote a book?

  5. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Been a while since I read it, but it's just depressing for me. I think it's a good book, as far as it tells a particular story well, but I don't understand this common perception of it as some sort of celebration of "an ordinary life". Stoner is an abject failure of a person, and it's all down to his own choices. He makes the decision not to go and fight for his country, fair enough maybe, but it's one of the first examples of him taking the easier road to avoid discomfort, and it heralds a pattern that he will follow throughout the rest of his life. He then latches onto a woman who is clearly damaged and likely to be no good as a wife, and for some reason marries her. Another decision that is maybe understandable, but once again reinforces his nonconfrontational and weak personality. Critically, he has the opportunity to go for a position (head of English, if i recall correctly) and passes on it. The man who gets the position then becomes his superior and later takes a dislike to him. Instead of making an effort to either reconcile or actually improve his lot by getting help from his friend who runs the overall department, he just does nothing and lets things run their course, damning himself to a mediocre teaching position. He has a child and forms a strong bond with her, but then does nothing when his lunatic wife decides to take control of the child and ruins her confidence, setting her up for a horrible future. Even when he reflects on his daughter years later, after she has become an alcoholic waster, all he can reflect is "at least she has the alcohol." Even his affair ends pathetically. He has the option to escape all of the drabness and mediocrity of his life with a woman who genuinely loves and respects him, and he chooses not to with the most cope-laden excuse he could have : "it probably won't work out", as if his life was already any good.
    He only does three things of note that show any backbone in the novel: pursuing his passion by switching from farming science to English lit, challenging his rival by teaching his course the way he wants, and publishing a mediocre book. The second of those is framed as some sort of great act of rebellion on his part, but in the context of all the awful failings and inaction in his life it rings hollow and only further accentuates how weak he is and how pathetic the hill he decided to die on was. Stoner probably never would have been a great man, but he could have been someone with a good life, highly regarded in his field, and with a happy family and children. Or he could have salvaged a life with a get out free card and went to live with the woman who actually loved him. At every point he fails to act to make any of this happen, and most of the time for almost no reason. It's a tragedy of the most banal and awful kind, which is what makes it an interesting novel. But nothing about it is life affirming or worth feeling good about unless it's seen as a cautionary tale about seizing life

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      I think the "uplifting" part comes from the fact that, despite it all, Stoner himself is not sad about it, which is curious because as you've shown he's objectively lived a shitty life born from his own shitty decisions. On top of that his happiness/contentment isn't from some cope like stoicism, it's simply the way he has lived his life. I don't necessarily think the point of the book is to point out how a life can or should be lived, but simply to render it in the truest sense and perhaps make us reflect on life in a way that Stoner himself never quite did.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Fair point. I don't disagree with what you've said. But Stoner should have felt bad, not just for falling short in his own life, but for allowing his daughter to be fricked up.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Studying english was the worst decision he took imo.

  6. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I felt like this book was ultimately pointless. Maybe that was the point. Don't be a Stoner.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      I see it as a manual on how not to live.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      frick off loser ima smoke up everyday

  7. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    > TFW fell for 'dark academia' meme

  8. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    When the frick did John Willams write a full length novel? Is this like that Symphony he won't release?

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