I don't get it.

I don't get it.

Beware Cat Shirt $21.68

Rise, Grind, Banana Find Shirt $21.68

Beware Cat Shirt $21.68

  1. 5 months ago
    Anonymous

    Read it again

    • 5 months ago
      Anonymous

      This dialogue is dull beyond belief but it serves an important purpose because it’s pretty much the only firsthand account of Hippocrates which we have from antiquity. This and the Protagoras. They’re important as historical resources detailing the Cos school of medicine.

      • 5 months ago
        Anonymous

        Was Hippocrates the original hypocrite, or are the words unrelated?

        • 5 months ago
          Anonymous

          Hypocrite comes from hupokrites, which means actor.
          So, no.

          • 5 months ago
            Anonymous

            I still wonder if Hippocrates had a philosophy centered around being a hypocrite though

          • 5 months ago
            Anonymous

            No, he did not. His works are incredibly interesting to read however.

            Actually, if you want a basic overview of who he is you can read the Phaedrus which OP posted. His bio details are given in that dialogue.

          • 5 months ago
            Anonymous

            QRD?

          • 5 months ago
            Anonymous

            He was a medical man (the very first) whose life is detailed by Plato in the Phaedrus. That’s pretty much it.

          • 5 months ago
            Anonymous

            not so quick.
            I know the basics about his stuff as a doctor.
            I want the details on the life.

          • 5 months ago
            Anonymous

            Well then just read the Phaedrus. It’s actually worked into the story which Socrates is giving.

          • 5 months ago
            Anonymous

            >qrd
            >obvious stuff
            >more context pls
            >just read the book

      • 5 months ago
        Anonymous

        No, he did not. His works are incredibly interesting to read however.

        Actually, if you want a basic overview of who he is you can read the Phaedrus which OP posted. His bio details are given in that dialogue.

        He was a medical man (the very first) whose life is detailed by Plato in the Phaedrus. That’s pretty much it.

        not so quick.
        I know the basics about his stuff as a doctor.
        I want the details on the life.

        Well then just read the Phaedrus. It’s actually worked into the story which Socrates is giving.

        >qrd
        >obvious stuff
        >more context pls
        >just read the book

        There's barely anything, just a sparse reference by the character Phaedrus.

        >S: Now then, do you think one can thoroughly understand the nature of the soul, in a manner worthy of speech, without the nature of the whole?
        >P: If one must be persuaded in some respect by Hippocrates, of the Asclepiads, it's not possible concerning the body either, without this approach.
        >S: What he says, comrade, is indeed beautiful. But besides Hippocrates, one has to examine the argument to see if it sounds in harmony.
        >P: I agree.
        >S: So then, concerning the business about nature, consider what in the world it is that Hippocrates and the true argument are saying.
        >270c

        • 5 months ago
          Anonymous

          That’s pretty much the only firsthand account of the man you’ve got. I don’t see how that is wrong. I never said the dialogue was Hippocrates centered rather that it’s importance lies in stuff like that which is entirely depent upon historical context not the actual ideas of the dialogue which are uninteresting blabber.

      • 5 months ago
        Anonymous

        >This dialogue is dull beyond belief
        Dumb homosexual, it's one of his most artistic and beautiful along with the Symposium.

        • 5 months ago
          Anonymous

          Why are you writing comments on the internet? I thought your hero hated writing. You shouldn’t write anything down like your hero wanted.

          • 5 months ago
            Anonymous

            Lmao, did you really say the dialogue was boring because the ideas in it made you seethe? Btw if you had literacy skills above a five year old you would understand the distinction between writing and dialogue, like we're having now. LOL.

          • 5 months ago
            Jon Kolner

            You shouldnt be using writing at all. Socrates would not want you to. It has clearly weakened your mind.

          • 5 months ago
            Anonymous

            Plato used writing moron.

          • 5 months ago
            Anonymous

            But not Socrates, the philosopher whose truth you seem intent on representing albeit poorly.

          • 5 months ago
            Anonymous

            >the philosopher whose truth you seem intent on representing
            Upon what basis? I can't remember ever saying this.

  2. 5 months ago
    Anonymous

    Writing is le bad

  3. 5 months ago
    Anonymous

    it's about beauty

  4. 5 months ago
    Anonymous

    the thing about Plato, is most people would just ignore Socrates. this guy has to think of every situation where people give a shit about Socrates.

  5. 5 months ago
    Anonymous
  6. 5 months ago
    Anonymous

    That's because you went with the audio book. Read it and you should be good, if not then you were filtered by the equivalent of a brita jug and philosophy isn't for you.

  7. 5 months ago
    Anonymous

    What Greek philosophy is most similar to the OT philosophy found in proverbs?

    What would be the Greek parallel of Proverbs 16:32 "Better to be patient than powerful; better to have self-control than to conquer a city."

    • 5 months ago
      Anonymous

      Probably Hesiod would be the closest because its religious wisdom literature. You'll get kinda similar things from the presocratics sometimes, but I think its more because we only have fragments of their work rather than it being a result of their style of writing.

      https://i.imgur.com/EdRTZzu.jpg

      I don't get it.

      I'm pretty sure its about having homosexual sex with young children. Phaedrus want to have lots of sex with children, but Socrates says you shouldn't have sex with children, except maybe if you are both really excited and maybe a little drunk. At the end there is also a bit on what makes good writing.

  8. 5 months ago
    Anonymous

    >‘Those who philosophize are likely unaware that those who rightly practise philosophy do none other than pursue dying and being dead’, that is to say, they want to become pure, or have already purified themselves. ‘Dying’ belongs to the present time and refers to the philosopher in the process of purification, while ‘being dead’ belongs to the past, and refers to the philosopher who has purified himself. We can conclude that philosophers practise none other than becoming pure or being pure, i.e. philosophy is a preparation for death. ‘Likely’ (kinduneuousin) stands in place of ‘they have concluded this from a necessary demonstration’.
    > he says that philosophy is ‘the greatest kind ofmusic’, not the kind of music that brings strings into harmony (this is trivial),but the parts of the soul, i.e. reason, spirit, and appetite, such that reason always rules, spirit is ruled by reason and rules desire, and desire is ruled. When these parts fulfill their proper function, the harmony of the soul is preserved, but if the worse parts usurp power, they create disharmony, <e.g.> when desire rules, as in the example of Phaedra who is throttled by love, or when spirit rules over reason, as in the example of Medea, when she says:I know that I am about to do evil,But spirit overcomes my decisions.

    • 5 months ago
      Anonymous

      >After these remarks, people raise the following puzzle: ‘what do you mean, Plato? Does the philosopher, whose character is like god on earth, infringe upon the sovereignty of the Demiurge and attempt to undo the bond that the latter has tied, like slaves that run away from their prison against their masters’ will? Did Plato not say the opposite in the same dialogue, namely: “we are as in a sort of prison and must not release ourselves from it, until he who bound us loosens the bond”? What shall we do, Plato? Should we pursue death because of your first statement, or not pursue it because of your second statement?’
      >We reply to this puzzle that Plato does not contradict himself with his second statement, and nor does the philosopher rebel against the Demiurge and attempt to loosen the bond which He has tied. But since death is twofold,just as life is, I shall begin from what is clearer (dispositions are clearer than their absence): there is a natural life and a voluntary life. Natural life is the bond between soul and body, when the soul gives perception and motion to the body, and to which all men are subject. Voluntary life is the bond between soul and body when we leave the soul to attend to the body’s pleasurable indulgences. This is what Plato says: every pleasure is like a nail that fastens the soul to the body. Not every man lives the voluntary life, but only the dissolute. If, then, life is twofold, so too is death. Two opposites exist in the same number of ways, since the two are equal in strength, since the stronger one will always prevail, and there will be one, [and] no longer two.

      • 5 months ago
        Anonymous

        >Now natural death is the separation of the soul from the body, to which all men are subject, when the soul no longer gives perception and motion to the body. But death is voluntary when we no longer allow the soul to attend to pleasurable indulgences, and instead the soul will finally be in charge, since the soul is Olympian while the body is earth-born, and it is not right that the better nature should be ruled by the worse. Only philosophers, whom Homer describes as follows, are subject to voluntary death:Twice dead men, when others die only once.
        >If, then, death is twofold, Plato does not really contradict himself when he sometimes says that one should prepare for death, and sometimes that we should not untie [the bond] until He who bound us unties it, but should leave nature to untie the natural bond when she pleases, while we may untie the voluntary bond which we ourselves have tied, so that Plato’s doctrines may be sovereign everywhere and promote that bond and release.
        >Therefore, we should practise death, not to bring about non-being, but well-being. Life is natural and death voluntary when the soul gives perception and motion to the body, but we do not allow the soul to attend to the pleasurable indulgences of the body. Instead, the better part rules the worse. Death is natural and life voluntary when body-loving souls hover around tombs after their natural death and produce shadowy phantasms. Homer hints at this when he says:Bewailing its fate, leaving behind manliness and youth.

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *