I finished this book

why don't people read this dialogue but just Republic and Symposium?

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  1. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Because it's 90% irrelevant ramblings about Plato's autistic world building project

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      a lot of stuff there is unreadable, but it's possible to find gems here and there.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        The only thing I remember was the shit about soul in Book X, obviously you need to read that for insight into late Plato, but laws and republic are both garbage imo.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          Because the Laws is arguably the most boring dialogue that Plato ever wrote.

          Tard.

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            spotted the troony

  2. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I haven't read it myself (yet), but from what I've heard it's mostly because it's his final work and one of his most difficult. Most think they can just be done with Plato after the Republic, Symposium, and a few of the early dialogues sadly. I plan on reading it last myself, with Statesman, Philebus, and Parmenides coming before. What did you think of it, OP?

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >What did you think of it, OP?
      Very chaotic, some passages hard to read because he just describes in details what kind of laws should be there and penalties, but there are some gems like his attack on homosexuality, support for women's education, who owns children of slaves, very detailed attack on hedonism at one point, some attack on naturalism but not very developed, a lot of the things I got from footnotes though, it's probably impossible to read something out of this dialogue without professional footnotes...

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >support for women's education,
        Wrong.

  3. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    one thing I got from footnotes which I thought is fascinating - is that Plato considered lawmaking to be a part of philosophy, not part of professional law.

  4. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    because it is one of his writings where you can't find anything about his theory of ideas... and that is why we read plato

  5. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Probably because Socrates isn't present in the work, i think most people read Plato to actually get Socrates view on things, at least with the earlier works.

  6. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Still holding out for it's sequel, 'Orders'

  7. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    because forgiving debts and performing land redistribution is 'against the fundamentals'.

  8. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    because it's some old guy's irrelevant 2500 year old political takes. it's like reading a Zionist's 100 tweet thread on the war in Palestine.

    what he said about alcohol was based though

  9. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I tried reading Republic but the foreword thingy already filtered me hard with the philosophy jargon and I put it away for now.
    >When the I of the I is It, It is the I
    Just made some random shit up in English but it was stuff akin to this, along with a billion citations.
    The translated Levitathan seemed much more readable compared to that.
    I think I may be just too dumb to understand this stuff.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >>When the I of the I is It, It is the I
      The frick version of the Republic are you reading?

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        lol, it's the foreword thingy before the actual book, not the book itself.
        I also wrote complete nonsense to give the idea and because I wouldn't even know where to begin with when translating it, I wish I could post an excerpt here but it's in Italian.

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          I'll post something regardless
          >Ciascuna cosa è quello che è, in quanto ha essere, per cui tutte le cose che sono, sono perché hanno essere e, perciò, alla fine si risolvono tutte nell’Essere Uno, indiscorribile, perché dell’uno non si può dire se non che l’Uno (l’è) è Uno (è è è) (Parmenide-Zenone d’Elea);
          If any Italian anon reads this, this is one of the passages that made me put the book away, for now at least.
          Sorry but I wouldn't have the slightest idea how to translate this.

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            That looks like a summary of or a slant translation of the philosopher Parmenides. The Republic doesn't read like that, but the dialogue Parmenides does toward the second half.

  10. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >why don't people read this dialogue but just Republic and Symposium?
    Almost everyone I know who has read Plato has read all 3. What a stupid post.

  11. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I like reading law, just finished Hammburabi.

    I agree with you and think it exceptional that after writing the republic, Plato sought to create in detail his own model society, very admirable. It is also significant that he chose to do this in the context of a law, being that in some sense, the law is like a code of morals for society, and what it rewards and condemns, greatly shapes the mind and body of the citizen. The flaws and limits of his are obvious, there being permanent and set limits to the borders, and the idea of absolute equal distribution among such a territory, is highly superfluous, as no land mass is constituted as such to be possible to distribute it in such a way. Aristotles further and in depth analysis is recommended too, in his Politics book, where he exposes the logical fallacies of the laws themselves. None the less, Plato's work is a great exercise, and is very thought provoking to read, but people are lazy, and white people are gay too busy with weed and pornography and video games, and twitter.

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