I have one (1) month to read this book. Someone come do it with me.

I have one (1) month to read this book. Someone come do it with me.

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  1. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    What's your address? I'll come

  2. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Only if you're a cute girl

  3. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    How do you imagine reading book with you over the internet?

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Collaboration over a matrix, telegram, or discord server.
      But daily, frequent collaboration, because I'm serious about finishing this book in one month.

      How hard can it be?

      It shouldn't be too bad. It doesn't require any prerequisite knowledge

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        How much time we need daily to finish it in a month?

  4. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    How hard can it be?

  5. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    PM me.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Check your front doorstep

      How much time we need daily to finish it in a month?

      Two 3 hour sessions in a day

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        I don't have that much time :/ Sorry, I can't help you.

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Email me at [email protected] if you’re serious. Send discord user and I’ll message you when I get home (in an hour or so).

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >Two 3 hour sessions in a day
        It's fricking over for us wagies

  6. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Post an update in a month, because I really doubt you (or anyone unfamiliar with the subjects) can read 1000 pages that quickly.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      NTA but ~35 pages per day is not very extreme

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        It really is quite a lot of maths to read and understand for one day.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Maybe that's the case, sure. But aiming for 1000 pages in a month and reaching 800 doesn't sound so bad either.

  7. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    For any anons that are willing to join, we've made a discord: https://discord.gg/tt8EFnqY

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Don't do it anons, they'll groom you into becoming a troony.

  8. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Bump, the first chapter was interesting

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      What was the first chapter about?

      In your work how crucial is the computational complexity of the systems you write?
      Is extremely high performance a factor?
      Do you have to model any problems with graph theory?
      Do you have to optimize machine learning operations? Other mathematical operations?
      Are you doing any form of cryptography? Etc
      If no, then you're right, you probably don't need a strong mathematics background. But most of the interesting problems require you to have one.

      [...]
      If you get gud enough, you won't have to wage

      >If you get gud enough, you won't have to wage
      How so? Academia would still be waging but for less money

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        The first chapter is an introduction to symbolic logic, inference rules, and certain methods for writing proofs. They do assume the reader is well versed in symbolic logic however, so they move past this section rather quickly. At the moment I'm supplementing with the first 3 chapters of How to Prove It which should take 1-2 days maximum.

        >>If you get gud enough, you won't have to wage
        >How so? Academia would still be waging but for less money
        Not academia. An advanced programmer can make plenty while also not waging

  9. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Can someone give me an example of how calculus/linear algebra is useful in CS other than graphics/physics engines/AI? Even if you are making those things from scratch it’s literally just plug and chug math. Having a deep understanding of them seems to have no benefit, I’ve never been writing a program and found my calculus/linear algebra knowledge to be useful in any way.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      In your work how crucial is the computational complexity of the systems you write?
      Is extremely high performance a factor?
      Do you have to model any problems with graph theory?
      Do you have to optimize machine learning operations? Other mathematical operations?
      Are you doing any form of cryptography? Etc
      If no, then you're right, you probably don't need a strong mathematics background. But most of the interesting problems require you to have one.

      >Two 3 hour sessions in a day
      It's fricking over for us wagies

      If you get gud enough, you won't have to wage

  10. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >cs
    troony meme soience

  11. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >Meyer
    should have picked a less israeli book goy

  12. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >tfw i look through the table of contents and its almost all material im familiar with
    Feels good man. Years of effort finally feel like they've sort of paid off. I remember long ago seeing books like this and it seemed like deciphering mystical runes. Keep at it anons, knowledge is it's own reward.

    Make sure to take good notes. I still refer back to my notebooks from years ago and it really does make the knowledge "your own" so to speak. It's good when you can use it as reference, written out in a way you understand best because it was written by you, for you.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Which books did you start out with?
      Which books are you reading now?

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >Which books did you start out with?
        I can't remember all of them with certainly, but:
        >book of proof
        >a transition to advanced mathematics
        >Rosen's Discrete Mathematics (i think 4th or 5th edition)
        >Guichard Calculus Early Transcendentals
        >Sandy Irani Discrete Mathematics
        >for algebra/trig/precalc I think I mostly various open books and especially Sheldon Axler Precalc (highly recommend)

        This isn't exhaustive but these are the ones I remember. You don't need all of these, theres a lot of overlap

        I realized eventually that it's better to focus on topics rather than books. So I would jump around a lot between different ones, and I highly recommend the same to any self learners. You don't have to read 1 book, page 1 -> final page. Feel free to skip to specific chapters, or maybe if you don't understand the description in one book, read another one and see if they explain it in a way that clicks with you.

        More than anything make sure you are doing exercises, trying the example problems, and even better making up your own questions.

        I did that thing where I wasted immense amounts of time deliberating over which book is "best" and in the process accomplishing nothing.
        >Which books are you reading now?
        Im trying to get a degree now, so mostly just whatever the school assigns. I have concrete mathematics which I've slowly tried working through in my free time. Its technically a no prerequisites text, but imo its very difficult and requires some prior exposure to the ideas because it moves fast and doesn't spend much time on the basics. Like induction is explained in 2 or 3 sentences then after that you're expected to use it in proofs.

        Also Udi Manber - Algorithms Creative Approach which imo is severely underrated.

        I highlyrecommend both. Where other books seem to pull equations out ohin air and then show the proof, these books both shows the "scaffolding"/ actual process of going from a question to the final equation, then proving their validity.

        • 2 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          >Udi Manber - Algorithms Creative Approach
          This seems like a good self study book for algorithms. I'm planning on going through a more formal introduction to algorithms with CLRS, but the Udi book looks like it would be a good supplement.

  13. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I'll consider it but first tell me:
    >your background in mathematics
    >your background in CS, both theoretical and practical
    >if you didn't go to uni, at least list the math courses you took in high school

  14. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Too long of a book, plus to do the practice problems.
    The chapters seem very general too. At first I thought this was gonna be a numerical analysis book.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      more math than comp sci imo, like do cs people really need to know about cardinality?

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        what do you think computer science is?

  15. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Math. One plus one is two.
    Computer Science: "The speedy thing pushes the holes!" 😀
    Done.

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