I know nothing about programming.

I know nothing about programming. What programming language should I learn, considering the state of the job market and how it is projected to be in the future?

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  1. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    learn Rust so C devs can laugh at you like Jabba the Hut. I chaga kun un bantha pudu

  2. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    c++ or c
    everything else is oversaturated for entry level

  3. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    It doesn't matter. If you had to ask you're never going to be a programmer.

  4. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Learn C.
    Only program in C for 6 months.
    Then learn C++ and use it for another 6 months.
    Then learn Ruby.
    You are now done.
    You can save time scripting with Ruby and do low level stuff when you need.
    If you want you can learn Clojure or Erlang, actor model is cool.
    And if you like dildos up your ass Rust is a great choice.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >Ruby
      Maybe 10 years ago

  5. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Rust will bever be taken seriously stuck with the fundamentals. C, Java (you are basically learning C# at the same time) javascript and python

  6. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    also learn fortran or cobol if you want a job where you can get away with smoking pot working for a large bank

  7. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Anon you need to tell us what jobs you're interested in. What you're interested in affects that. Plus you can always learn more languages they aren't hard once you have the fundamentals.

  8. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    If you don't have a degree it's 1000% over. Learn whatever your school's curriculum uses. The days of degreelets getting programming jobs is completely over, unless your uncle owns Nintendo or something.

  9. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Just stop now. The world doesn't need another webshitter.

  10. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Python is the best to start with.

    Trying to Learn on C is like trying to learn to drive is a car that is rolling down hill towards a cliff, while also being on fire.wjvrk

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      haha wow so true, hey you should make a thread on reddit man
      quick, go do it now

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      C++ was my first real language, learned it in an "intro to programming" course I took as a high school freshman
      no programming language is too hard to be your first language as long as you have a good course/textbook to walk you through it
      Im happy C++ was my first language it was a good foundation for learning basic CS topics and the syntax is so influential that learning C or C++ is like learning the "latin" of programming languages

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      don't listen to this.
      Learn C. It's not hard.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >Trying to Learn on C is like trying to learn to drive is a car that is rolling down hill towards a cliff, while also being on fire.wjvrk
      Every language is that except C, you can just write C on a piece of paper and it will compile

  11. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I get all my career advice from IQfy
    Swaglord tells me to buy Apple products, I don't buy Apple products. I put my money in the bank.
    IQfy tells me to learn C, I don't learn C, I learn Rust instead.
    Shrimple as that.

  12. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Learn Go

  13. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    use unsafe rust, both cniles and rustroons will seethe at you for using a language with both a decent stdlib and the ability to segfault at any time

  14. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    You need to learn everything. And if you weren't born already knowing everything, well, NGMI.

  15. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Javascript and Python are still most popular for a reason. They're most people's entry point and easiest to learn. If you learn Javascript all you have to compete with is a bunch of jeets (that's why its called Jeetscript). Anyway I'm insane so take this with a grain of salt.

  16. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    learn C++ for a robust foundation then graduate to using Python for 99% of your needs

  17. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Can anyone recommend a book for learning python?
    One that isnt written by jeets or crtl-c from the net

  18. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    C++ is the only acceptable language, comrade
    Glory to the CPP

  19. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Fricken answer me c**tS

  20. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >know nothing
    >want to learn programming for a career
    >likely is not a fresh grad who can get internship
    good fricking luck. see you in a few good months saying it's over

  21. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Java or C#

  22. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Depends on what you want to do.

    If you want to tinker with devices and hardware-related code, C. C skso makes learning of other C-like languages easy.

    If you want to make performant desktop applications, C++.

    If you want to make quick scripts that perform simple things, learn shell, awk and Python.

    If you want to analyse data, Python, R, Julia.

    If you want to make games, C++ or C#.

    If you want to do mobile, Kotlin or Swift.

    If you want to dye your hair blue and become a woman, then Rust.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      What if I don't know what I want to do?

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Then don't learn programming. It's waste of time if you aren't going to use the skill anywhere.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          Hmmm, you might have a point there. What do you do with programming anon?

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            For work, I'm a PhD student in biology and I slap together some Python and R code to do real-time analysis on animal behavior, get numbers out of it, and send them to a server. I also rewrite our lab's old Matlab stuff to Python.

            For a hobby, I'm making a shitty RPG from scratch in C++.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            >PhD biology
            Was biology always your first choice?
            >For a hobby, I'm making a shitty RPG from scratch in C++.
            Damn where do you find the energy to do this? I barely keep up with my bachelor program.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            Bio was always my #1 choice. I like coding but I want to do something practical. Luckily theres a huge pressure in bio fields to become more quantitative and rigorous, so theres a lot of demand for any coding skills.

            PhD work in my lab is quite independent and I arrange my own experimental schedules. I do the RPG for 0.5-2 hours a day, so nothing very intensive. I just want to frick around and learn how to make a working engine and gradually build something on it.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          this

          >PhD biology
          Was biology always your first choice?
          >For a hobby, I'm making a shitty RPG from scratch in C++.
          Damn where do you find the energy to do this? I barely keep up with my bachelor program.

          programming is a tool, nothing more
          if you dont have any interests or hobbies where this tool would be useful then theres no point in learning it and youll never reach a high level of proficiency

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            >interests
            Oh I have plenty of interests but I can't myself to start. "Recently" I made a startup page with HTML and CSS and I wanted to continue by adding javascript but never got around to actually doing it

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            just fricking do it homie
            but actually you just have to do a little bit every day and get into the habit of pushing your projects forward little by little (and some days a lot when you go on a roll)
            drink a monster or something

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            Alright I'll try to get into a rhythm maybe I'll even find something that I want to try next to build

  23. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    All languages more or less share the same fundamentals. There is no first best programming language to learn. You will have a hard time no matter what language you pick as learning how to program is where most frick up.

  24. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    So you have no actual plan to do anything with it, you just want to be prepared? OK, then instead of learnung a _language_, learn _programming._ Just pick one and focus on learning concepts like data structures, algorithms, memory management, REST etc. Take a MOOC and, importantly, when you finish, keep taking classes, doing coding challenges etc to keep it fresh and sharp in your mind.

    Then, if you ever get a job where coding is a requirement, you will use the language you're told to use and be expected to learn it quickly, Which you will be able to do because the programming knowledge you learn will still be valid and just need to be written a different way.

  25. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >Lisp/Scheme
    >Python
    >C++
    >assembly
    That's it. Don't bother with anything else

  26. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Pascal, then Forth and C, then Asm

  27. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    learn how to solve problems, pick any language, it doesn't matter

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      What are the best moron-friendly books about algorithms and data structures? Preferably something that uses a useful language
      I saw someone recommend PPP by Stroustrup but it doesn't seem to be about algos

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        skiena's algorithm design manual, I think it uses a mix of pseudocode and C
        but again, language doesn't matter, pick whatever
        my suggestion is python since it requires minimal configuration

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          >python
          What are the best python books/resources for algorithms and data structures?

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous
          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            The thing is I know how to code already but I have no fricking clue about actually good programming. Algorithm design, problem solving and so on, how things actually work

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            Just find an algorithm/data structure book and work through it. Most algorithms/data structures are easily ported between languages with very little changes. I made a whole bunch of algorithms and data structures using Go but the languages used originally was C for some and Python for others. Learn merge sort, binary search, linked lists, tries, hash tables and then you're already better than 90% of IQfy (as IQfy is mostly jeets who are needful weapons of durga or webshitters).

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            I downloaded CLRS but holy shit it seems extremely dense and difficult to work through. Gonna try to find something easier
            >you're already better than 90% of IQfy
            What does it take to be a genuinely good programmer, just what you said?

  28. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Oh look, yet another fricking "which language should I learn?" moronation.
    Fricking rope yourself, sex offender.
    See you in another 10 minutes, homosexuals.

  29. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    you're asking the wrong questions.

  30. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >considering the state of the job market and how it is projected to be in the future?
    >a few years later

    [...]

  31. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Learn how to program, don't get too attached to a language they are just mere pawns for your projects

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >Learn how to program
      how

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Here good luck

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          Roll

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          Rolling

  32. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    If you're old enough to be on IQfy and you really know nothing about programming, you shouldn't be looking into it as a future job.

  33. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Definitely start with C. Do a full deep dive. Do your intro to programming in C. Build something in it.

    Learn Data Structures and Algos. Find some free course on it. Implement the data structures and algorithms in C.

    Then the programming world is your oyster, just look at whatever niche you want to do and just build the thing that relates to your niche.

    By this point you'll be resourceful enough to investigate which languages are used in which niche.

  34. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    the first language you'll learn is most likely not the only language you'll learn or even the one you'll find work in, so just pick something for learning and that makes sense.
    >golang
    >c#
    >java
    >kotlin

  35. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Go

    Go is probably the perfect language to learn first

  36. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Someone explain why IQfy thinks Rust is for trannies?

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      rewriting public systems in rust could at least in theory save a lot of lives so theres a non zero chance its foreign agitprop aimed at right wing morons

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      It's stereotype based on some chronically online Rust advocates and mentally sick people who happened to be transsexuals

  37. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >considering the state of the job market and how it is projected to be in the future
    - natural language prompting
    - GPU cleaning/maintainence
    - Survival skills

  38. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Autist/hikki-psuedoNEET opinion: the "future job market" is determined by irrational CTOs who chase the whatever trendy shitware floats their fancy in the name of "early adoption". You might have better luck reasoning with the stock market than actually trying to predict what the frick they are going to want next year.
    If you cannot code, learn something, anything, and pay attention to the fundamentals as well as the language tooling. If you cannot decide what to start learning, let a random number generator return a number from 1 to 4 and pick up the documentation for Python, C, Java, or Node.js accordingly. Those aren't all the best languages, they just have resources and comfortable enough support that you can do most of anything you'd ever want to do with them.
    Again, try to pay attention to how the language operates beyond syntax (you don't want to be that one beginner who "knows" JavaKotlinRubyonrailsPythonC#C but can't actually execute anything with them for jack shit) and general concepts that transcend specific languages. There's logic, variables, arrays, functions/procedures, then the file system, standard algorithms (sort, search,) standard input/output, then concurrency, object-oriented programming, memory and binary, then networking and databases, in rough order of complexity. You don't need to learn all that immediately, grasp them at your own pace. Get at least somewhat comfortable with the command line, and know at least the basics of Git and Docker/Podman (bog-standard DevOps shit that I don't think is going anywhere soon)
    Maybe this is overkill, and maybe there are lots of jobs that will pick up any JavaScript monkey regardless of ability to understand the computer and create new solutions, but I advise people to become well-rounded and learned programmers with a mindset that lets them tackle any problem so they don't get shafted the microsecond the good times cease.

  39. 1 month ago
    The Falcon

    So you want to learn programming?

    Pick a starting language. For beginners, there are generally two recommended "programming families" that you can choose to start learning:
    -Dynamically typed/interpreted programming languages, such as: Python, Javascript
    -Statically typed/compiled programming languages, such as: C, C++, Java, C#

    These are amongst the most popular languages in use worldwide (all in the top 10). Both approaches are perfectly fine, and well-documented.
    -Dynamically typed programming may be a bit more flexible, convenient, and forgiving. It is more popular in academia.
    -Statically typed programming is a bit more suited for making general applications. It is more popular in industries.

    Cannot decide? Flip a coin.

    If you choose statically typed/compiled programming, you may want to start with C, then pick up C++. C is very well documented, and teaches many universal programming concepts. C++ is based on C, and adds new concepts. Sources:
    For C:
    The C Programming Language (K&R)
    C Primer Plus (Prata)
    http://www.cprogramming.com/tutorial/c-tutorial.html
    http://www.learn-c.org/

    For C++:
    http://www.learncpp.com/
    http://www.cplusplus.com/doc/tutorial/
    http://www.cprogramming.com/tutorial/c++-tutorial.html
    http://en.cppreference.com/
    https://isocpp.org/faq

    If you choose dynamically typed/interpreted programming, you may want to start with Python. It is very easy to pick up. Here are some good sources:
    http://www.learnpython.org/
    https://www.codecademy.com/catalog/language/python

    >BUT I WANT MORE SOURCES!
    Read: https://wiki.installgentoo.com/index.php/Programming_resources

    >BUT I WANNA START WITH [language x] INSTEAD!
    Sure, if you like. But the languages above are considered good for beginners.

    >BUT I WANNA MAKE A COOL WEBSITE!
    Learn HTML, CSS, and Javascript.

    >BUT I WANNA MAKE iPHONE GAMES!
    Learn Objective C and/or Swift.

    >BUT I WANNA MAKE ANDROID GAMES!
    Learn Java and/or Kotlin.

    >BUT I WANNA MAKE PC GAMES!
    Learn patience.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >BUT I WANNA MAKE iPHONE GAMES!
      >BUT I WANNA MAKE PC GAMES!
      Why do people want to program nowadays? What motivates them?

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        They want to make video games?

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          You don't need to program to make video games. Just use an engine.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >COOL WEBSITE
      What about PHP?

      • 4 weeks ago
        The Falcon

        No one should start with PHP. They can learn PHP later.

  40. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    be interested in how computers and the web works first. Then fill in the blanks

    get a text editor and keep a folder with snippets of code here and there to get in a flow state then build something

    learn how compilers work and how it works with the linker, etc

  41. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Python for ai or quick shit
    Java or C# for enterprise bullshit
    JS for web

    Everything else is meme

  42. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    unironically ruby on rails, shitloads of job postings where I live and few applicants because no graduates are learning it.
    I know frick all about ror but ruby seemed like a comfy language at least.

  43. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Please don't listen to IQfy

    IQfy is shit, IQfy doesn't know its ass from its elbow. Learning C won't teach you how to program, it'll teach you C. None of the things that make C a pain in the ass are present in literally any other major language, even sepples.

    If you just want to get a job, learn JS or Python.

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