I NEED to know this

if you were sitting on a planet in the middle of intergalactic space would it be really dark?
the furthest object we can see with the naked eye is Triangulum (the galaxy next to Andromeda) and it's barely a tiny faint smudge to our eyes
but I don't know if that is due to light pollution from our galaxy or the viewing distance would be the same in intergalactic space

if it is the same then intergalactic space would be incredibly dark to us no? almost pitch blackness with only a couple reference points in the form of galaxies nearest to you

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  1. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    IF IT WAS DARK YOU COULD JUST TRUN ON YOUR LASER SWORD FOR LIGHT!!!

  2. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I guess this settles it. I was right.
    Thanks for being completely useless (as usual) IQfy.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      that sounds completely moronic

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Explain why.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      hey, I tried!

      >if it is the same then intergalactic space would be incredibly dark to us no?
      yes, some voids are many millions of light-years wide. Indeed, if I had to guess, to the naked eye it would be only darkness.

  3. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    The only objects that *might* be visible if you were sitting in intergalactic space near the Milky Way.

    I count the Magellanic Clouds and nearby star clusters as part of the Milky Way because I am racist against them and they will never be real galaxies so I'm not giving them separate entries.

  4. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >xkcd
    sup reddit

  5. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >if it is the same then intergalactic space would be incredibly dark to us no?
    yes, some voids are many millions of light-years wide. Indeed, if I had to guess, to the naked eye it would be only darkness.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      then why isn't the night sky total darkness?

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        You see stars, nebulas in the night sky. Objects from our galaxy.
        The only intergalactic objects that you can spot with your naked eye are the ones in this

        https://i.imgur.com/x1Psp52.png

        The only objects that *might* be visible if you were sitting in intergalactic space near the Milky Way.

        I count the Magellanic Clouds and nearby star clusters as part of the Milky Way because I am racist against them and they will never be real galaxies so I'm not giving them separate entries.

        picture. And that is if you have really good vision, Andromeda and Triangulum are the only ones most people can make out.

        • 2 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          if the question in OP is regarding whether you could see objects in interstellar space, then the answer is no. in fact you wouldn't even see your own hands and body (assuming you're just floating in space in a space suit). but that should be obvious. it is well known that even while spacewalking near Earth, shadows behave very differently because there's no light being reflected from other surfaces. so when you are looking at the ISS or any object, one side is fully illuminated by the sun, but the other side is near pitch black.

          but it sounded to me that OP is asking whether you would see galaxies and stars in interstellar space, to which the answer is yes. in fact you would see more stars than here on earth because no light pollution/atmosphere/clouds etc.

          • 2 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >in fact you would see more stars
            Only in the most pedantic sense that looking at a galaxy is "seeing stars." In truth what you'd see in the sky in intergalactic space is just galaxies. Some of them would LOOK LIKE very dim stars because they happen to be the right size and distance away, but they'd really be galaxies.

          • 2 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            colloquially galaxies are just called stars, but technically you're right

          • 2 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            The question was about intergalactic space, not interstellar space.

            >in fact you would see more stars
            Only in the most pedantic sense that looking at a galaxy is "seeing stars." In truth what you'd see in the sky in intergalactic space is just galaxies. Some of them would LOOK LIKE very dim stars because they happen to be the right size and distance away, but they'd really be galaxies.

            >Some of them would LOOK LIKE very dim stars
            That is underselling it. See the image

            https://i.imgur.com/x1Psp52.png

            The only objects that *might* be visible if you were sitting in intergalactic space near the Milky Way.

            I count the Magellanic Clouds and nearby star clusters as part of the Milky Way because I am racist against them and they will never be real galaxies so I'm not giving them separate entries.

            .

          • 2 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >The question was about intergalactic space, not interstellar space.
            doesn't really make a difference, does it

            https://i.imgur.com/x1Psp52.png

            The only objects that *might* be visible if you were sitting in intergalactic space near the Milky Way.

            I count the Magellanic Clouds and nearby star clusters as part of the Milky Way because I am racist against them and they will never be real galaxies so I'm not giving them separate entries.

            why wouldn't you be able to see other galaxies when you can see them from here on Earth?

          • 2 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Yes it does make a huge difference. The distances get insane.

            >why wouldn't you be able to see other galaxies when you can see them from here on Earth?
            You can't. We can see them with advanced telescopes but just with your eyes, the only galaxies you can maybe make out are Andromeda and Triangulum, the ones in our immediate vicinity.

          • 2 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >You can't. We can see them with advanced telescopes but just with your eyes, the only galaxies you can maybe make out are Andromeda and Triangulum, the ones in our immediate vicinity.
            my point is, you could see pretty much the exact same thing you can see from here on earth, which is far from
            >almost pitch blackness
            I'm not really getting where this idea is coming from

          • 2 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Yes. You would see galaxies the same as you see them from Earth.
            On Earth we can see the light from two galaxies (aside from ours obviously) in the night sky.

            Now imagine you are sitting in the middle of the distance between Andromeda and the Milky Way.
            You would see a very small Andromeda galaxy, a very small Milky Way and a dim spot for Triangulum.
            Nothing else.

          • 2 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >On Earth we can see the light from two galaxies
            what are you talking about? I remember seeing way more dots on the night sky

          • 2 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Those are stars, from inside our own galaxy.

          • 2 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            ok and? how is that
            >almost pitch blackness
            you would be seeing the exact same stars and galaxies you can see from here on earth. I still don't understand what the question in OP is. yes it would be dark but why is this such a big revelation to him?

          • 2 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Be honest with me, are you trolling?

          • 2 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            no but apparently we have very different definitions of pitch blackness

          • 2 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            If you went outside the Milky Way you would not see all the individual stars you see all around you inside the Milky Way, because you are now outside the Milky Way.

          • 2 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            ok I get what you mean now

          • 2 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            You are responding to a bot

  6. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Then explain how they got this picture of Pluto all lit up by sunlight? Did they have a flash?

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Pluto is in the middle of a galaxy, and next to a star.
      But yes it does get much darker than on Earth, that photo is artificially brightened.

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