i still use it. i make money with it. its better than python and php

i still use it
i make money with it
its better than python and php

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  1. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    if you make money with it, why advertise it? the reason you're being paid is because no one wants to deal with ruby, pretty low IQ to create your own competition

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      only high IQ people use Ruby
      since masses are low IQ shitskis they fallback to python and php

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        >only high IQ people use Ruby
        >zero reading comprehension
        IQ people can be using the most obscure language, they don't go out of their way to advertise it when the reason it commands a high price knowing it is because no one else does.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          not everyone is a cheap piece of shit greedy israelite like you

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            You sound dumb, that guy is right

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            why wtf
            cant we talk about our preferred languages?
            muh money every time , really?

            >you stupid fricking noob timezones issue is a universal issue and a proof of a skill issue
            What is this dumb cope?
            >its not Rails specific
            That's not what I said.

            you insinuated

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            >you insinuated
            Insinuated what?
            That when Date.today == Date.tomorrow returns true, it looks silly?
            Damn right I did.
            What are you getting offended for, though?

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            ok maybe im just too angry because of my corpo work on friday and the scum managers requesting reports on our work from now on blablabla
            but on IQfy it usually works like this:
            the thread is about X tech
            somebody posts a pic in said tech showing something shitty and moronic
            its usually taken to mean that the poster is showing how moronic things happen in X tech becase X tech sucks

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            Fair enough.
            Nah, I like Ruby and I like Rails.
            The Date.today thing is simply something that was causing issues in our repo when all of us were way less experienced.
            And that picture is a nice encapsulation of why was it causing issues.

            The short of it, Date.today is a Ruby method and it returns the local time of the machine.
            You shouldn't use it with Rails, where the time zone of the server should be configured separately and shouldn't be expected to match the local time.
            Instead, use Date.current (and Time.current instead of Time.now for time due to all the same reasons). Date.tomorrow / Date.yesterday are Rails methods and they use the time zone if it's configured.

            made a pic for you
            [...]
            concerns are for composition as far as i understand it

            >concerns are for composition
            Yeah, I mentioned that.

            Also, excessive concerns are also le bad, similar to excessive inheritance.
            We also try to avoid ActiveRecord callbacks when possible.
            Validation is fine, because it's very obvious, but when parts of the logic get spread out all over the place, reading code becomes much harder.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            but isnt all that in UTC? i thought utc is not aware of timezones

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            I don't quite remember the defaults but usually it's local UTC time with whatever offset for the Ruby's Time.now and UTC+0 for Rails Time.current (which is Time.zone.now under the hood, if Time.zone is defined, otherwise it defaults to Time.now)
            Time.now returns Time and Time.current returns the special sauce ActiveSupport::TimeWithZone.
            >i thought utc is not aware of timezones
            It's not that it's unaware, it's just self-referential.
            The machine itself can be, say, in JST (so UTC+9) but the server would be UTC+0 - that's nine hours of difference.
            And if you want to, the Rails one can be in any specific time zone instead (albeit I wouldn't do that).

            You can work with instances of either Time class - they are compatible.
            [35] pry(main)> Time.now
            => 2024-03-09 04:57:11.668287675 +0900
            [36] pry(main)> Time.current
            => Fri, 08 Mar 2024 19:57:15.239914101 UTC +00:00
            [37] pry(main)> Time.now.between?(Time.current - 1.second, Time.current + 1.second)
            => true

            But while either Time instance has its UTC offset (i.e. the time zone), if you just grab the date, you will lose that information.
            [39] pry(main)> Time.now.to_date
            => Sat, 09 Mar 2024
            [40] pry(main)> Time.current.to_date
            => Fri, 08 Mar 2024

            As you can see, there's no +0900 or UTC +00:00 left for Ruby to be smart about comparing the dates.
            And that's completely normal because it shouldn't check current time to compare dates.

            Date.today and Date.current work similarly.
            Date.current will try to call Time.zone.today if Time.zone is defined and will default to Date.today if it's not. But the return values are just dumb dates.

            And most people know about Date.today and Time.now because both are very intuitive.
            But Date.current isn't as intuitive, and many don't know about it. Meanwhile, Date.tomorrow and Date.yesterday both call Date.current internally (in Rails).

            So you can end up getting incorrect values for specific dates or days of the week.

  2. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I slip sass and coffee script into PHP projects for job security and secret PTO. "Oh man those design changes will take 1000 lines of css and a few hundred of javascript!! I can get it done in about two weeks." Write a couple dozen lines, compile, go on a trip for a week, commit code early and bill 45 hours. "Alright i really crunched hard on this one, hopefully the overtime is acceptable since i delivered a week early"
    Meanwhile the lead dev still doesnt know what map() does and never learned OOP in PHP, only in Java 5 which he wasted 2 years of school working with

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      how come that nobody calls you on your bullshit?
      i work in a serious company for serious money and that shit could not fly because I am not working literal morons

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        For them its either me or outsourcing which takes longer and more money to get a broken result. I initially suggested the structural changes and other improvements to make everything quicker to develop. First, no one wants someone younger coming in telling them to change everything, and second they dont want to learn unless theyre dorced to. The only big things they took me up on were using submodules instead of doing a git clone and copying into the main repo from upstream projects, and having automated tests. I guess those suggestions weren't stepping on toes. I also did those in my freetime and demonstrated how they were part of my workflow at home.

        Ruby is a very nice language.
        I worked professionally with C#, Ruby, Java, Objective-C, JavaScript and out of these, Ruby and C# are my favorite.
        I've been working as a RoR BE engineer for the last five years. Tried out Spring for a few days and realized it's somehow even more magical and arbitrary than I initially thought Rails were.

        Sass is pretty cool.
        Coffee script is dogshit, though.

        They both suck but if you're working on a legacy project they are still the improvement they were when they were invented

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Ruby is a very nice language.
      I worked professionally with C#, Ruby, Java, Objective-C, JavaScript and out of these, Ruby and C# are my favorite.
      I've been working as a RoR BE engineer for the last five years. Tried out Spring for a few days and realized it's somehow even more magical and arbitrary than I initially thought Rails were.

      Sass is pretty cool.
      Coffee script is dogshit, though.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        C# looks so much like PHP
        Go is superior

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          I have my doubts with Go. It has nice syntax and is really nice to basic little programs in but It took the team behind it over 12 years to implement working for loops and the way you import packages is still a bit fricky (even after a few iterations). Last I tried it I couldn't just point to a path of a local package and import it, I had to do some go mod tard wrangling. Even C does this better.

  3. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    it's nice, but it's kinda dead.

  4. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Which I could say I "like" it but it reality it is rails you have to "like". Plain ruby is nice but when you have to go do everything the "rails" way it gets really cumbersome. Conventions, magic methods and meta programming that requires having a running console to get to the definition of something and even then it may not tell you even "patch" that may be attached to an instance of an object. Shit like that is a waste of my time.

  5. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >dinamically typed garbage, japan

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      made a pic for you

      >concerns
      It's debatable if concerns can even be considered "metaprogramming".
      They're more of an inheritance replacement.

      Ruby can effortlessly cast strings to classes, define methods on the fly, slap them onto existing instances and pass them around - all at runtime.
      That's very powerful and more often than not hilariously unreadable, so it should be used very sparingly.

      Concerns, in comparison, are very tame and exist to precisely to improve code readability.
      Composition is generally easier to understand at a glance than inheritance, especially for people unfamiliar with a given codebase.

      Now, monkey patching is not that different from concerns implementation-wise but it's way more of a metaprogramming tool, and, predictably, it makes code way harder to understand.
      But sometimes it's way easier to monkey patch a library with a few lines that help adapt it to your project's needs than do the supposedly "proper" thing.

      concerns are for composition as far as i understand it

  6. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    how do you deal with dynamic types

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      i grab them by the pussy

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      They don't
      https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=39159002#39159481

  7. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    It would be a shame if that beautiful language ever disappeared. Programming in Ruby is actually fun, compared to most other languages. Too bad it's a bit slow, but for my own use cases that's no problem.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      slow compared to python and php?

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Yes I like ruby way more than python. And it was built to be fun. I forgot it and focused on lisp but its easy as frick to understand.
      Why python indentation alone makes it barely usable.

  8. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Based
    It has been putting food on my table since 2014
    Death to strongly typed languages

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      have you ever had to do lots of metaprogramming?

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        No because I usually avoid excessive metaprogramming since the code becomes un-navigable
        I use it heavily in rails concerns but not elsewhere

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          nice

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          >concerns
          It's debatable if concerns can even be considered "metaprogramming".
          They're more of an inheritance replacement.

          Ruby can effortlessly cast strings to classes, define methods on the fly, slap them onto existing instances and pass them around - all at runtime.
          That's very powerful and more often than not hilariously unreadable, so it should be used very sparingly.

          Concerns, in comparison, are very tame and exist to precisely to improve code readability.
          Composition is generally easier to understand at a glance than inheritance, especially for people unfamiliar with a given codebase.

          Now, monkey patching is not that different from concerns implementation-wise but it's way more of a metaprogramming tool, and, predictably, it makes code way harder to understand.
          But sometimes it's way easier to monkey patch a library with a few lines that help adapt it to your project's needs than do the supposedly "proper" thing.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            whats the point of your pic when its a literal lie?
            why would I then read your blogpost?

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            >when its a literal lie?
            It's not a lie but an example of a common mistake people make when working with Rails, you sweet summer child unmolested by time zones.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            you stupid fricking noob timezones issue is a universal issue and a proof of a skill issue
            its not Rails specific
            stupid codemonkey

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            >you stupid fricking noob timezones issue is a universal issue and a proof of a skill issue
            What is this dumb cope?
            >its not Rails specific
            That's not what I said.

  9. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    There are also some edge cases when you are trying to manipulate Time, that can create issues, but I don't remember exactly what were those.
    I only remember encountering some and promptly replacing all cases of Time.now across our entire codebase.

  10. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >its a dead language
    Meme, languages don't really die when there's still millions of lines of code out there that need to be maintained. It's not the language taught in bootcamps, it doesn't have a new framework released every day to try and bend it and fix it, it's not a language most people can claim to know after making a website in a school class, there's good reasons for why JS is popular and Ruby is undeniably less popular in comparison now, but to say it's "dead" because it's no longer the default is moronic, NPCpilled and rat race tier thinking

  11. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I'm a python developer. Redpill me on Ruby.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      It's basically japanese python for weebs and hipsters.

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