I think I got filtered

I think I got filtered

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  1. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    How do you get filtered by this book that is lionized by the most basic b***h art hoes in existence?

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Then perhaps it was I who did the filtering and the book that was filtered.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      This isn't even true lol

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Sure, lil guy

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          >Susan Sontag
          >most basic b***h art hoe in existence
          lol

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          Sontag is far from "basic b***h art hoe"

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Lol you’re a moron. That’s her entire readership. The most insufferable people with down syndrome imaginable who call themselves readers because they watched Gilmore Girls growing up and got into Barnard and Smith

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            So if Susan Sontag wrote positively about you that means your work is for basic arthoes? Do you really want to play that game?

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            You’re a disingenuous moron and I would not want that pseudo-intellectual moron as part of my novel. Again, anyone who elevates Songashit that highly has suspect taste and is certainly a plebbitor

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Cervantes, Flaubert, Dostoyevsky, Gombrowicz, Joyce, Mann, Alighieri, Baudelaire, Borges, Kafka, Goethe, Faulkner, Huysmans, Conrad, James, London, Blake, Stendhal. The most basic arthoes in existence seem to have a decent enough taste. Certainly better than most people. I need a basic arthoe gf immediately.

            https://www.goodreads.com/list/show/128270.Recommended_by_Susan_Sontag

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Literally two good authors in that list at best.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            At least 6, actually. Keep coping and seething,

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Against Interpretation has been required reading for every lit major for half a century, important work and not in some feminist sense. She earned her place and has been fairly consistent over they years.

            While yours is the most accurate definition I think magic realism is a similar term to "absurdism" that has taken on multiple meanings. Like how someone would reference "the absurd" and could mean Camus, the French Theatrical movement or absurd fiction in general like Kafka or Gogol.
            I'd say capital letter Magical Realism is what you said.

            >I'd say capital letter Magical Realism is what you said.
            Nah, if you make it generic then you make it meaningless. Absurdism is generic in the literary sense never really coalesced as a style or movement and is one of a dozen names for a dozen vaguely related movements and when used generally an adjective or the like would be applied unless you mean it in the generic sense of authors exploiting the absurd such as with the French who are generally refereed to with "The Theater of the Absurd."

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Sorry about that last sentence, meant to edit it but got distracted by new posts and forgot.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            go back

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          or you meant the number of ratings?

  2. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >Juan Rulfo

  3. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I enjoyed it
    To me it seemed like a mashup between As I Lay Dying and Absalom, Absalom! Only set during the Cristero War instead of the US Civil War
    And Rulfo doesn’t do the chapter heading thing to let you know who the narrator is. That’s a pain in the ass at first but at least there’s no Darl chapters

  4. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Collected my thoughts on the novel:
    >Pedro himself
    Pretty interesting character. The story being about Juan about the beginning but slowly shifting more and more to Pedro is an interesting narrative device to show his importance. His character was simple enough - the man who had everything he could possibly want, except the one thing he truly wanted, Susana. Every character's story being unbreakably linked to his was also a good touch. Definitely displayed the social issues of the time as well, how people were basically serfs of wealthy landlords.
    >Father Rentería
    Not sure why but priests always seem to be the most interesting characters in Latin American works. Rentería's conflict between his religious duties and the realities of his secular situation was compelling. How Christianity was examined through his lens was nice as well. The people of Comala sinned day in and say out and always expected someone else to pardon them (Rentería, their families, etc.) but they never actually made a change.
    Class consciousness was present in his character too. I liked his reflections on how he was basically a tool of the wealthy and could not give aid to the poor who truly needed it.
    >environmental storytelling
    The environment of Comala seemed to reflect the mood of each scene. Whenever something sorrowful occurred there was rain. In Dolores's happy recollections everything was always in bloom, spring was always sprung. The best way this was used was when Susana's mother died and she felt she should be sad, but she wasn't - and neither was the day.
    Also, plenty of stuff alluding to Comala being some sort of Asphodelic plain - pomegranate trees, sulfuric smell, how all roads to it are always sinking. Apparently Paramo means "wasteland" as well.
    >God and man
    Seemed like a big part of this story was about the contradiction between God's "love" and what man suffers through. Whenever misfortune befell someone, even death, they always thanked God. Rentería wondered why men had to suffer and struggle so if they were doomed to purgatory anyway.
    Overall I think it felt like a bit of a let down. Maybe it's because I didn't read it in the original Spanish. Felt like it could've used a 100 more pages too.

  5. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    First 30% is boring garbage. Then its just artsy flashbacks telling a story with some ghosts of the past bullshit imagery. Wasnt bad but only latins would dare to call this a masterpiece.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Werner Herzog considers it an all-time masterpiece, though.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Wankers love anything exotic with some magical realism. The death of Artemio Cruz is pretty much the same book but way better. Both in translation ofc so what do I know.

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          thank you for the new recommendation despite your bad attitude
          i will enjoy this new exotic thing that has the kudos of being a bit more obscure

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            More obscure? Carlos Fuentes is probably Mexicos most famous author.

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          >only latins call it a masterpiece
          >here's a non-latin who calls it a masterpiece
          >le exoticism and magical realism!
          God, you're exhausting. And this book doesn't really have much in the way of magic realism. There are ghosts and that's about it. Ghosts exist elsewhere.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Literally half the book is him walking around a village and seeing ghosts and visions of the past. Again I dont hate this book, but magic realism together with non-European scenes somehow make critics all giddy. Because we cant actually empathize with another culture so it has to be magic and 1000 nights.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >Again I dont hate this book, but magic realism together with non-European scenes somehow make critics all giddy.
            It's barely magic realism. But this would apply to stuff like Blood Meridian, too. Silly criticism.
            > Because we cant actually empathize with another culture so it has to be magic and 1000 nights.
            Skill issue on your part.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            It isn't criticism about the book, but criticism about how people overrate anything that is le magic realism ever since Murakami and Marquez.

            As for the skill issue thing, clearly you dont understand points unless I spell them out literally. The we refers to the western "readers" in general who will only read something foreign if it also has fairy tales and folklore flying around.

            I think one of my main criticisms is the fragmented style.
            Generally when a book is told this way the author seems to have a purpose behind it. Think Catch-22, As I Lay Dying, Slaughterhouse V, etc.
            But with Pedro Paramo it almost feels as if he made the story fragmented and non-linear just for the hell of it. And this style isn't being written with narrative intention I think it suffers.

            Yeah, I wasnt a fan of the structure either. The first part felt a bit gimmicky. Artemio Cruz is also very fragmented but it works better for me.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >but criticism about how people overrate anything that is le magic realism ever since Murakami and Marquez.
            I still fail to see how this is "magic realism". It's like "Faulkner meets the ghost side of Henry James." There's no magic, no fairies, no wizards. Also this was praised way before Murakami was a meme.
            >The we refers to the western "readers" in general who will only read something foreign if it also has fairy tales and folklore flying around.
            But that's completely false. There are non-magic non-Western books that people read in the West. And this is debatably a Western novel.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >I still fail to see how this is "magic realism". It's like "Faulkner meets the ghost side of Henry James." There's no magic, no fairies, no wizards. Also this was praised way before Murakami was a meme.

            Cant really say no magic, no faeries, no wizards if there are literally ghosts... Its pretty widely seen as a huge influence on the magic realism wave that came.. But sure, maybe the first 40 pages of ghosts was just a forced narrative gimmick to kickstart the actual story.

            >But that's completely false. There are non-magic non-Western books that people read in the West. And this is debatably a Western novel.

            Again, you maybe think of the 10 people who actually read novels. Im talking about the Oprah book of the week crowd. The people actually buying novels (not reading then per se).

            And if you call this a western novel then you pretty much claim the entire latin american boom as western aswel.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      I think one of my main criticisms is the fragmented style.
      Generally when a book is told this way the author seems to have a purpose behind it. Think Catch-22, As I Lay Dying, Slaughterhouse V, etc.
      But with Pedro Paramo it almost feels as if he made the story fragmented and non-linear just for the hell of it. And this style isn't being written with narrative intention I think it suffers.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        For me it added to the phantasmagoric theme. How ghosts may exist in non-linear flashbacks in time. At least that's how I think of them, as these random moments in time.

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          I agree with your analysis. In fact, there's a part where "echoes" are specifically mentioned in this regard that basically compares a ghost to an echo of a life. It was with Damiana Cisneros I believe.
          Maybe I just found the execution lacking. I really liked Catch-22 being fragmented to show trauma and the absurdity of war, so I don't think it's a preference thing.

          >but criticism about how people overrate anything that is le magic realism ever since Murakami and Marquez.
          I still fail to see how this is "magic realism". It's like "Faulkner meets the ghost side of Henry James." There's no magic, no fairies, no wizards. Also this was praised way before Murakami was a meme.
          >The we refers to the western "readers" in general who will only read something foreign if it also has fairy tales and folklore flying around.
          But that's completely false. There are non-magic non-Western books that people read in the West. And this is debatably a Western novel.

          >I still fail to see how this is "magic realism". It's like "Faulkner meets the ghost side of Henry James." There's no magic, no fairies, no wizards. Also this was praised way before Murakami was a meme.

          Cant really say no magic, no faeries, no wizards if there are literally ghosts... Its pretty widely seen as a huge influence on the magic realism wave that came.. But sure, maybe the first 40 pages of ghosts was just a forced narrative gimmick to kickstart the actual story.

          >But that's completely false. There are non-magic non-Western books that people read in the West. And this is debatably a Western novel.

          Again, you maybe think of the 10 people who actually read novels. Im talking about the Oprah book of the week crowd. The people actually buying novels (not reading then per se).

          And if you call this a western novel then you pretty much claim the entire latin american boom as western aswel.

          Magic realism essentially means one of two things:
          1) People reacting in realistic, psychologically profound ways to a fantastical element of a story. Generally there isn't an abundance of fantastical elements in the story from experience. Think Beloved by Morrison.
          2) Something fantastical written by a non-white person. Think Beloved by Morrison again.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >Magic realism essentially means one of two things:
            Brain rot. No, it was a major literary movement in Latin America and essentially their version of modernism. Unlike the US and Europe their modernist movement had to take account of the old ways which were still very strong and not just be myopic about the new. Anything from elsewhere in the world is not magical realism but sometimes people call other things that because of a superficial likeness.

            If you want to be so broad about the term than their are plenty of white writers who would fit, Hesse being the obvious example.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            While yours is the most accurate definition I think magic realism is a similar term to "absurdism" that has taken on multiple meanings. Like how someone would reference "the absurd" and could mean Camus, the French Theatrical movement or absurd fiction in general like Kafka or Gogol.
            I'd say capital letter Magical Realism is what you said.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            I think what distinguishes magic realism from fantasy is the approach characters have to the fantastic/magical elements. In magic realism, characters for the most part just live with them as a fact of life, hence "magic realism" (magic as if it was as real as anything else). There's also the fact they're primarily centered in the real world as opposed to an otherworldly land. In fantasy, they deal with them as if it's such a discovery, such a new thing to explore or deal with, something supernatural they didn't know (or at least some characters didn't know). In fantasy there's this sense of wonder, in magic realism there's this sense of "this is how things really are." Amazement vs nonchalance. I don't think it has anything to do with any racial or ethnic reductionism. I also don't think it was movement. It's more like a subgenre or a style.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        To me the fragmented style makes sense, because it’s as if all the dead want desperately to be heard so they all talk at the same time and over each other. Also I think he wanted to represent in the structure the “ghost story aspect of it, ghosts being fragments and pieces of different times. And on a second reading, it didn’t really seem as fragmented as it did initially.

  6. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Your just dead, front mind mother.

  7. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I thought it was shit. Clear he wanted to tell some lame story about Pedro, but knew himself that wasn't interesting enough, so he put this eggshell-thin ghost shit around it with barely any thematic reason for doing so and called it good.

  8. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    You are allowed to simply not like books, it doesn't mean you "got filtered".

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Checked but also a thread starting with "I didn't like it" gets fewer responses than facetiously saying I got filtered.

      It's not a plot book. It's a vibes book... I think.

      The atmosphere was certainly the best part. I mentioned here

      Collected my thoughts on the novel:
      >Pedro himself
      Pretty interesting character. The story being about Juan about the beginning but slowly shifting more and more to Pedro is an interesting narrative device to show his importance. His character was simple enough - the man who had everything he could possibly want, except the one thing he truly wanted, Susana. Every character's story being unbreakably linked to his was also a good touch. Definitely displayed the social issues of the time as well, how people were basically serfs of wealthy landlords.
      >Father Rentería
      Not sure why but priests always seem to be the most interesting characters in Latin American works. Rentería's conflict between his religious duties and the realities of his secular situation was compelling. How Christianity was examined through his lens was nice as well. The people of Comala sinned day in and say out and always expected someone else to pardon them (Rentería, their families, etc.) but they never actually made a change.
      Class consciousness was present in his character too. I liked his reflections on how he was basically a tool of the wealthy and could not give aid to the poor who truly needed it.
      >environmental storytelling
      The environment of Comala seemed to reflect the mood of each scene. Whenever something sorrowful occurred there was rain. In Dolores's happy recollections everything was always in bloom, spring was always sprung. The best way this was used was when Susana's mother died and she felt she should be sad, but she wasn't - and neither was the day.
      Also, plenty of stuff alluding to Comala being some sort of Asphodelic plain - pomegranate trees, sulfuric smell, how all roads to it are always sinking. Apparently Paramo means "wasteland" as well.
      >God and man
      Seemed like a big part of this story was about the contradiction between God's "love" and what man suffers through. Whenever misfortune befell someone, even death, they always thanked God. Rentería wondered why men had to suffer and struggle so if they were doomed to purgatory anyway.
      Overall I think it felt like a bit of a let down. Maybe it's because I didn't read it in the original Spanish. Felt like it could've used a 100 more pages too.

      that I liked the environmental storytelling a lot.

  9. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    It's not a plot book. It's a vibes book... I think.

  10. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Jorge Luis Borges considered Pedro Páramo to be one of the top 50 books written in any language

  11. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >the only ones hating on based Pedro are americans and seemelingly australians
    >the first hate it because muh mexicans named Pedro took our jobs, the others hate it because asstralians are braindead morons
    I kek
    t. austrian bvll

  12. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I always recommend reading Campobello before Rulfo and i wish someone had told me that years ago

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