I thought this might help me with retaining information but all it's showing me is how to tell if a book is fiction or not.

I thought this might help me with retaining information but all it's showing me is how to tell if a book is fiction or not.

It's All Fucked Shirt $22.14

Nothing Ever Happens Shirt $21.68

It's All Fucked Shirt $22.14

  1. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I've never seen this book mentioned outside IQfy.

    My recommendation for retaining stuff is to not read haphazardly. Have little projects of reading related books focused around a subject that interests you. You will naturally engage with and interrelate the material and think about it during your day. That's how you retain info.

  2. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    If you want to retain, you should read books twice. As Taleb says, never read a book you wouldn't read twice. You should also take notes in the few blank pages at the beginning of the book, just jotting observations and main points. It also helps to give a summary of the main argument.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      I liked it have read it twice I think, I have no idea how that's all you got out of it though.

      that's moronic, how do you know if a book is worth reading twice before you read it? It's also fine to read fiction. Adler goes over general approaches much better in the book. Taleb is a fricking tool though anytime anyone brings it up it's like the biggest midwit flag.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        You're obviously familiar enough with Taleb to call him a tool, but how have you not heard of the Lindy effect and his various heuristics for picking and dropping books?

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          The lindy effect is moronic it's like an inverse of one of xeno's paradoxes. Anyone who says it just makes me kind of afraid for how little they think about what they say. I dont know any of his heuristics for books but I wouldn't use them or you might end up as much of a tool as he is.

          It reminds me of people who study philosophy in college who really don't merit studying it. They have to come up with schemes and things to study that are basically just bullshit because in reality they are just doing a larp anyway. They should be accountants or something. If you want to read you shouldn't be struggling to figure out what to read.

          Maybe I just have an elitist background, but isn't reading retention/comprehension something that someone would naturally learn with a decent American K-12 education? I know a lot of people with diplomas got Cs and Ds but it's hard to give people advice on how to get the most out of reading without stating what I'd say is obvious to anyone who paid attention half the time in junior high.

          he covers that in the book, the answer is no. I assume no one teaches it well anywhere to be honest.

          The conspiracy take on this is
          https://www.pccs.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/06/LostToolsOfLearning-DorothySayers.pdf
          That it was intentionally done to make advertising more effective

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            I've had Sayers on my to-read list for a while. I've heard this theory before and I'll advance it up the queue. Thank you for the rec, Anon.

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            good post anon, and yes, there is definitely a conspiracy around it.

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >Has it ever struck you as odd, or unfortunate, that to-day, when the proportion of literacy throughout Western Europe is higher than it has ever been, people should have become susceptible to the influence of advertisement and mass-propaganda to an extent hitherto unheard-of and unimagined? Do you put this down to the mere mechanical fact that the press and the radio and so on have made propaganda much easier to distribute
            over a wide area? Or do you sometimes have an uneasy suspicion that the product of modern educational methods is less good than he or she might be at disentangling fact from opinion and the proven from the plausible
            People who are literate are more susceptible to propaganda. The only defense is going back to being illiterate peasants who reject lies on grounds of faith.

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >The lindy effect is moronic it's like an inverse of one of xeno's paradoxes. Anyone who says it just makes me kind of afraid for how little they think about what they say. I dont know any of his heuristics for books but I wouldn't use them or you might end up as much of a tool as he is
            The Lindy effect is incredibly robust. You should unironically read Taleb.

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >Lost Tools of Learning by Dorothy Sayers
            Checked.

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Plato was so right about the merchant class bros

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >taking notes on the book when notepads, exampads exist
      Buddy please don't, no one, not even yourself wants to see your moronic ass ideas when engaging with a book the first time.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        I don't lend out my books and I only take notes on the second reading, as Adler says. Also, taking notes on the book is much more convenient.

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          >dont lend out books
          fair enough anon, fair enough

  3. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Unironically go back and actually read the book again. It literally tells you how to remember and analyze a book beyond the distinction between fiction and non-fiction. In fact one problem I have with the book is that it constantly repeats the advice. So you have to be trolling to not get a general sense of how to do this.

  4. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Maybe I just have an elitist background, but isn't reading retention/comprehension something that someone would naturally learn with a decent American K-12 education? I know a lot of people with diplomas got Cs and Ds but it's hard to give people advice on how to get the most out of reading without stating what I'd say is obvious to anyone who paid attention half the time in junior high.

  5. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >How To Read A Book
    >you learn how to read a book from a book you have no idea how to read

    Who thought this one up? Jesus Christ!

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      my head would frickin explode if I was the author and I had to hear this lame fricking joke constantly the rest of my life whenever this book was mentioned
      iirc he mentions something like this it in the foreword of the book too, obviously a later edition

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Honestly, he brought it on himself. But, I get it.

  6. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    use emac sir

  7. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    i just skimmed the book and it does not seem to talk about remembering information at all, except as a prerequisite to true understanding. it mostly talks about choosing what to read and trying to understand the big picture of a book or the most important parts (skimming and analytical reading). also it talks about how to gain an understanding from reading many books about a certain topic (syntopical reading).

    if you want to remember stuff then use a spaced repitition system like anki. and after reading something try to retrieve that information again by drawing a mind map of the concepts.

    read the last chapter of the book called "make it stick". it is a summary of methods to remember things you have learned.
    > practice retrieving new learning from memory
    > space out retrieval practice
    > interleave the study of different problem types
    > elaboration
    > generation
    > reflection
    > calibration
    > mnemonic devices

    was that what you meant with "retaining information"?

  8. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    ok, let me redpill you plebs of how it works:

    if you consume something and don't remember anything 1 month later then it wasn't worth remembering. this happens with 99% of books because it's a shit medium.

    the point is that you should remember how you felt while reading it, and the aftertaste when you finished, and based on that you can tell if it was good or not. if it was EXCEPTIONALLY good then non-remembering it is actually a plus since you can experience it multiple times through your life and have VERY similar emotions to the first time (this is actually a pro of books as medium)

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      i feel like this is horrible advice for non fiction. and even for fiction this only works if you never want to talk about books with other people. this is like the most hedonistic book reading advice i could possibly think of. maybe makes sense to have this advice on IQfy, where people do not have irl friends or goals.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >i feel like this is horrible advice for non fiction.
        yeah sorry, i was talking about fiction only.

        about non-fiction it's pretty straightforward: read, put stuff in practice, if it sticks the it was useful, if it doesn't then you probably didn't need it anyway, re-read again if getting the urge, etc...

        >only works if you never want to talk about books with other people. this is like the most hedonistic book reading advice i could possibly think of
        i read books for myself, not to prove other how good i am at remembering wikipedia summaries.

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          > i read books for myself, not to prove other how good i am at remembering wikipedia summaries.
          yeah, but do you talk to people ever? other people also read books for themselves, but that does also mean that they want to understand more about a book. and talking to people about a book can give you a new view on things that you might appreciate, for yourself.

          what do you think?

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >yeah, but do you talk to people ever?
            yeah i do. when talking about book it's usually "oh have you read x? cool how was it? should i read it?" and not "oh, you've read harry potter? name all spells then"

            > that does also mean that they want to understand more about a book
            only if the book was exceptionally good

            >talking to people about a book can give you a new view on things that you might appreciate, for yourself.
            true, that's why after reading a good book you start discussing it with others (while it's still fresh in your memory) and the more it was interesting the more you discuss it and the more you memories "solidify".

            so again, at the end, your remembering of the book is just a skill issue on the writer's part. and yeah, most books are slop, that's why you don't remember them

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            > yeah i do. when talking about book it's usually ...
            can't you steer the conversation into a more meaningful direction? is everyone on this board here talking about books like this?
            > only if the book was exceptionally good
            well you mind find out that the book was better than you thought with additional context.
            > true, that's why after reading a good book you start discussing it with others (while it's still fresh in your memory) and the more it was interesting the more you discuss it and the more you memories "solidify".
            i think you put too much faith into your own memory. sometimes people can forget things that are even important for their survival. and i think you cannot really know when you will find a good partner for a book discussion. i just don't think that the brain is perfectly structured for book discussions, as we did not co-evolve with books you know.

            but i don't want to force you into anything you don't like. i just kinda have the feeling like you don't know what you are missing, probably because you have forgotten the details.

            do you think it is possible at all for you to think a book is kinda shit and after talking to somebody else about it you actually change your mind about that? or given some other context? because then i would say it could be useful to remember some details that made you think why the book was dumb, so you can be challenged on those. or is that just not a possibility? like can remembering something about a book ever be useful or not?

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >can't you steer the conversation into a more meaningful direction?
            like? "what do you this is the color of hermione's panties?"
            >well you mind find out that the book was better than you thought with additional context.
            sunk cost cope, if i need to look stuff up to "get it" then it's shit (for me)
            >i think you put too much faith into your own memory. sometimes people can forget things that are even important for their survival.
            never had this problem, i remember sidequest from 200h long rpgs 10 years after i've played them if they were memorable
            >and i think you cannot really know when you will find a good partner for a book discussion. i just don't think that the brain is perfectly structured for book discussions, as we did not co-evolve with books you know.
            true, but as you've probably guessed i'm not really a big fan of books

            >do you think it is possible at all for you to think a book is kinda shit and after talking to somebody else about it you actually change your mind about that? or given some other context? because then i would say it could be useful to remember some details that made you think why the book was dumb, so you can be challenged on those. or is that just not a possibility? like can remembering something about a book ever be useful or not?
            it's possible, but if you didn't get them while reading then regardless that book wasn't for you

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            > like? "what do you this is the color of hermione's panties?"
            yes if that is meaningful to you. but i feel you just avoided the question by making a joke.
            > sunk cost cope, if i need to look stuff up to "get it" then it's shit (for me)
            yes it can be sunk cost cope, but let's say a lot of other people who you think are not dumb say the book is good, or the author wrote other books you liked, then maybe you are missing something.
            > never had this problem, i remember sidequest from 200h long rpgs 10 years after i've played them if they were memorable
            well that would explain why we are not understanding each other.
            maybe you really do not need notes.
            > it's possible, but if you didn't get them while reading then regardless that book wasn't for you
            why? what is the proof for that? can't i get enjoyment or meaning out of something with a bit of extra effort?

  9. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    stick with it and you'll not regret it

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *