If desalination technology ever becomes cheap enough, would it be a worthwhile investment to flood Death valley with desalinated seawater?

If desalination technology ever becomes cheap enough, would it be a worthwhile investment to flood Death valley with desalinated seawater?

You would essentially be recreating the ancient lake that existed there 20,000 years ago.

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  1. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Wouldn't it just evaporate

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      It would need to be continuously topped off, but the filling stage would take the vast majority of energy.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        It might work if they pump salt water in initially to raise the evaporating temperature, otherwise it will just be dried up as quickly as you can pump it

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        I need to be continuously topped off by your mom lmao

        Adding some sort of water source to the valley would create a difference in atmospheric conditions, so it would fundamentally change the environment.

  2. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Why?
    you can simply pump seawater until it gets the same salinity as a normal sea.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      You can’t use seawater to irrigate crops.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        Grow salt water sea weed and algae. This is a huge business in Japan, Korea and possibly a few other places.

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          Would there even be a demand for something like that in America?

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            You can easily manufacture it. A few years ago eating insects would have been unthinkable in the US, now they're being served at restaurants.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            Interesting

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            Japanese and Korean immigrants would probably love it. The Japanese word is Nori, and is rather rich in certain minerals.
            https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nori

  3. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    More worthwhile = pump huge quantities of desalinated water to high altitudes in the center of the Sahara and try to bootstrap a self-sustaining water cycle again.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      The aternative is a lot simpler:
      https://retro-futurism.livejournal.com/987678.html

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        neat

  4. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    20,000 years ago Canada was covered in a mile thick sheet of ice, and temperatures were 5-10 degrees colder. California would have been more like British Columbia is today.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      >California would have been more like British Columbia is today.
      packed to the brim with chinks and pajeets?

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Yes, there were tule marshes around the nevada lakes back then, totally different climate.

  5. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Would urban farming be profitable alongside a project like that?

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Forgot pic.

  6. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Probably not
    The whole reason this region is so dry now is because of the geography and also probably temperature changes
    In the ancient past both of these things were surely completely different
    The eastern side of the west coast is dry because of the massive mountain ranges that more or less run along the entire coast forming a wall that splits the region in half (Mt. Whitney is the highest point in the entire contiguous US)
    These mountain ranges (which were obviously created by the same geological activity that has creates all the mountainous terrain on the ring of fire) block nearly all moisture from getting inland and basically just create the exact conditions for a desert
    If you were to simply put water there it would just dry up again eventually unless you literally tore down the mountains or put such a massive and unfeasible amount of water there to create a self sustaining cycle which even then could probably still have a reasonable chance of failing

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Dig tunnels under the mountains.

  7. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >muh gay world building fantasies
    Ernest Jones, in 1913, was the first to construe extreme narcissism, which he called the "God-complex", as a character flaw. He described people with God-complex as being aloof, self-important, overconfident, auto-erotic, inaccessible, self-admiring, and exhibitionistic, with fantasies of omnipotence and omniscience. He observed that these people had a high need for uniqueness.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      You need to get out more

  8. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Been there a month ago. Due to the recent hurricane in August there is still a lake there. According to rangers, there has been "one in a thousand year" flood 3 times in a decade. So no need for desalination, just let the global warming do its things

  9. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    its not desalination tech becoming cheap, its energy prices dropping. those prices would've dropped with the advent of nuclear power, had the government not created regulations against it

  10. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    You don't need to desalinate it, especially not to begin with

  11. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Why would you want to help California of all places?

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Flooding parts of California can help other states.

  12. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    This idea is moronic but California desperately needs a daul-function nuclear desalination plant.

  13. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Definetly not. The investment required all for fricking what, making a lake you dont even have ownership of? Govt doesnt give enough of a shit

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      You get to flood large parts of California, which I understand many consider as a major improvement.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      The housing and agriculture developments around the lake would pay back most of the investment, not to mention providing drinking water.

  14. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >le epic world changing epic
    You have a messianic complex, which is a mental disease

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Bruh, I just genuinely want to help people and alleviate the drought in the southwest. And it's not like I'd be playing God because a lake already existed there 20K years ago, where there were (primitive) people living in the area.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        >I am the savior of the drought stricken southwest
        wow, you're totally a saint an sheeiiiiiiit and not an absolute mental case

  15. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    I'm genuinely surprised that Elon Musk or Jeff Bezos haven't pitched something like this yet.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Who says they are not already in the process of buying lots of useless desert land and then turn it to high end beachfront properties? There are land acquisition projects going on in California already.

Comments are closed.