If you follow Plutarchs exact specifications to the letter then the Ogygia or Homer must be the Rockall island in the North Atlantic (five days by ...

If you follow Plutarch’s exact specifications to the letter then the Ogygia or Homer must be the Rockall island in the North Atlantic (five days by boat from Britain).

https://greekreporter.com/2024/01/02/odysseus-travel-ireland/

Imagine Odysseus imprisoned on this thing for seven years.

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  1. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Perhaps he picked up his gift of gab from the natives.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      I think it is likely ancient britons and Irish saw birds flying that way out to sea so they knew there must be an island out that aways. Birds fly that way because it is the only landmass in several hundred miles of the North Atlantic. Why they speculated that it was the home island of Calypso is anyone’s guess.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        I would say your guess on the directional patterns of the birds is more reasoned than what Plutarch had to say in all honesty since trying to follow it to a T left the writers of the article right where they started.

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          The article writers try to point it as Ireland but then at the very end of the article they mention that it fits none of the criteria. I posted the article because it was actually helpful pointing out what Plutarch’s exact words were. The interesting thing is many such as Kepler thought he was also talking about North America in the same text.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            I did notice that as well on the Kepler comment, even granting extreme interpretive latitude to the theory I am not entirely sure the Greeks possessed ships capable of trans-oceanic passage, but I am also not knowledgeable enough on their ship building to say what the maximum hypothetical range of one would be. This sort of reminds me of Plato's Atlantis, there is probably no end to the possible guessing but ultimately it is tantamount to a vessel they used simply for saying what they intended and perhaps little else.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            Strabo the Greek geographer interpreted Homer’s comments as locating Ogygia and the land of the Phaicians in the Atlantic. Homer said they lived in “the great streams of ocean” and that man never ventured that aways. I agree with you on all accounts because actually trying to pinpoint anything is a vain endeavor.

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          I was looking up other islands in the north atlantic. The Faroe Islands are roughly five days distance from Britain and also one thousand miles from Greenland (the other continent?) I believe that even if those islands werent Ogygia the fictional description was loosely based on something real. There are 18 Faroe islands but Putarch's description was of three islands (Ogygia and two other islands where a Titan was held). As it would happen there are three major Faroe islands which could fit the description.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            That is possible I suppose, when you start getting that close to arctic then you start to experience more drastic effects in the distribution of sunlight, I don't recall off hand whether the Odyssey makes mention of this but I would expect it to if so though, I would be hard pressed to imagine the Greeks omitting something like this given the nature of their works.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            Eh, I’m just throwing out random ideas. The op post was more of a joke post by being overly reliant on Plutarch who was himself way off base. I DO however agree with the Homeric excerpts posted here

            It is never explicitly stated to take place within the Mediterranean.
            Such are the sentiments of Polybius; and in many respects they are correct enough; but when he discusses the voyage beyond the ocean, and enters on minute calculations of the proportion borne by the distance to the number of days, he is greatly mistaken. He alleges perpetually the words of the poet, “ Nine days by cruel storms thence was I borne;

            ” but at the same time he takes no notice of this expression, which is his as well,

            “ And now borne sea-ward from the river stream
            Of the Oceanus;1

            Odyss. xii. l.
            and this,
            “ In the island of Ogygia, the centre of the sea,2

            Odyssey i. 50.
            and that the daughter of Atlas3 dwells there. And the following concerning the Phæacians,
            “ Remote amid the billowy deep, we hold
            Our dwelling, utmost of all human kind,
            And free from mixture with a foreign race.4

            Odyssey vi. 204.
            These passages clearly refer to the Atlantic Ocean,5 but though so plainly expressed, Polybius slily manages to overlook them. Here he is altogether wrong, though quite correct about the wandering of Ulysses having taken place round Sicily and Italy, a fact which Homer establishes himself. Otherwise, what poet or writer could have persuaded the Neapolitans to assert that they possessed the tomb of Parthe- nope6 the Siren, or the inhabitants of Cumæ, Dicæarchia,7 and Vesuvius [to bear their testimony] to Pyriphlegethon, the Marsh of Acherusia,8 to the oracle of the dead which was near Aornus,9 and to Baius and Misenus,10 the companions of Ulysses. The same is the case with the Sirenussæ, and the Strait of Messina, and Scylla, and Charybdis, and Æolus, all which things should neither be examined into too rigorously, nor yet [despised] as groundless and without foundation, alike remote from truth and historic value.

            “Center of the sea” “remote among the billowy waves”

            Ogygia was objectively intended to be somewhere outside the Mediterranean/ in the Atlantic even if it wasn’t a real place.

  2. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    "You will find the scene of Odysseus' wanderings when you find the cobbler who sewed up the bag of winds." – Eratosthenes

  3. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    is there a source of fresh water?

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Well it’s a giant granite slab in the middle of the ocean. It also doesn’t have a beach (where Odysseus was weeping when Hermes came) or a cave where Calypso lived.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        Could the sea level been lower at the time? Is there maybe additional land mass around it which is now underwater but was above the water in Homers time?

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          It’s actually one of three islets in Rockall Plateau.

          https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rockall_Basin

          The actual history of any of it being above water I do not know.

          Hasselwood rock is also above water technically but is not immediately apparent.

          https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hasselwood_Rock

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      If you look very closely at the picture there is algae or lichens which Odysseus could have survived off of.

  4. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    It’s a fictional place.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Nothing gets past you, it would seem.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        Thanks. I pride myself on that

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          Your brain is a fictional place.

  5. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Plutarch is wrong, the events of the story took place within the Mediterranean, the Island is describing as having juniper trees; nowhere near the north sea

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      It is never explicitly stated to take place within the Mediterranean.
      Such are the sentiments of Polybius; and in many respects they are correct enough; but when he discusses the voyage beyond the ocean, and enters on minute calculations of the proportion borne by the distance to the number of days, he is greatly mistaken. He alleges perpetually the words of the poet, “ Nine days by cruel storms thence was I borne;

      ” but at the same time he takes no notice of this expression, which is his as well,

      “ And now borne sea-ward from the river stream
      Of the Oceanus;1

      Odyss. xii. l.
      and this,
      “ In the island of Ogygia, the centre of the sea,2

      Odyssey i. 50.
      and that the daughter of Atlas3 dwells there. And the following concerning the Phæacians,
      “ Remote amid the billowy deep, we hold
      Our dwelling, utmost of all human kind,
      And free from mixture with a foreign race.4

      Odyssey vi. 204.
      These passages clearly refer to the Atlantic Ocean,5 but though so plainly expressed, Polybius slily manages to overlook them. Here he is altogether wrong, though quite correct about the wandering of Ulysses having taken place round Sicily and Italy, a fact which Homer establishes himself. Otherwise, what poet or writer could have persuaded the Neapolitans to assert that they possessed the tomb of Parthe- nope6 the Siren, or the inhabitants of Cumæ, Dicæarchia,7 and Vesuvius [to bear their testimony] to Pyriphlegethon, the Marsh of Acherusia,8 to the oracle of the dead which was near Aornus,9 and to Baius and Misenus,10 the companions of Ulysses. The same is the case with the Sirenussæ, and the Strait of Messina, and Scylla, and Charybdis, and Æolus, all which things should neither be examined into too rigorously, nor yet [despised] as groundless and without foundation, alike remote from truth and historic value.

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