In your opinion, how far-fetched is the theory that Windows will stop using NT as a kernel in the future and will use Linux with proprietary user land...

In your opinion, how far-fetched is the theory that Windows will stop using NT as a kernel in the future and will use Linux with proprietary user land?

Is NT that difficult to maintain? (I don't think so)

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  1. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    They will probably just wrap Linux&Wine into a fancy Windows Windows Manager and call it day

  2. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    It's not exactly likely, since the NT kernel is where Microsoft's competent engineers are, but it's far from impossible since they already replaced IE with a Chromium skin. But make no mistake, it would be an absolute disaster for computing. It could take centuries before something other than Unix could ever catch on again.

  3. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Unlikely, there's too much NT-specific behavior that needs to stick around.

    More likely they go the route Apple does with their OS where the kernel is a glorified hypervisor/exokernel thing and NT is just one of many kernels running on top of it alongside Linux.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      I read a blog post by a Hyper-V dev to this effect, he figured that once wslg was more mature the very idea of only using one operating system would be antiquated. Wish I could find it.

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        I believe this is already kind of the default behavior on Windows 11 when you enable hyper-V but hyper-v itself is still heavily based around NT, so it's more of a situation of NT running on a stripped-down NT.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      very because that's illegal and doesnt make much sense but management is moronic so it's not impossible
      if anything they could use linux as hypervisor in the name of security or just for limiting user freedom, i could see that happen
      doesnt make much sense financially but if they wanted to make some sort of next gen new world order OS they'd consider it

      moron award

      That is the stupidest thing I have ever heard. Windows NT is the death star of operating systems once you understand the architecture. There is nothing to abandon it for.

      it's technically vastly superior but in practice it's cheaper for them to do some clusterfrick Black persony like WSL2 instead of utilizing the powerful NT architecture

  4. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    0% chance it'll ever happen

  5. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    But why would they do this? Haven't they spent time and money on their own?

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      edit: on NT

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >Haven't they spent time and money on their own?
      Sunken cost fallacy, Anon.

      Just because they already spent money on their own kernel does not mean they should necessarily stick with it in future.
      The question is: Would using another kernel be better than using the old kernel? Past costs do not matter. Only the future ones.

      (I am not saying that Windows should make the transition, but your particular reasoning is faulty.)

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        true, and smart.

  6. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Microsoft already ported Hyper-V to Linux, but it can only run Linux guests, I think.

  7. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >pay devs to maintain NT kernel
    >mooch off linus
    corporation will go for the money every time, the only reason why it hasn't happened yet is that it's probably prohibitively expensive to migrate

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      It will happen eventually, guaranteed. They already cancelled Windows 12 because they can't handle the mess they've gotten themselves into.

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Source: It came to me in a dream.

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        What mess?

  8. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    What i anticipate is Windows going the Hypervisor/micro kernel-ish route with Hyper-v allowing you to sesmlessly run Windows and Loonix as Guest OSEs side by side and everything being orchestated by Hyper-v under the rug.

  9. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >how far-fetched is the theory
    Chances of this happening within the next 10 years is close to zero.

  10. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Even ignoring the massive tooling and infrastructure and hiring/training costs, what would they gain from doing that?

    They'd be giving up control over a crucial technology in their stack, OR would have to maintain their own fork which isn't all that different from maintaining their current kernel.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      the NSA would block MS from making windows open source long before that

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        The NSA doesn't have any problems backdooring open source software. It's been proven to be really easy to sneak exploits in, but they don't even need to, they just need to be the first to find exploits.

        https://i.imgur.com/bHHeRom.png

        In your opinion, how far-fetched is the theory that Windows will stop using NT as a kernel in the future and will use Linux with proprietary user land?

        Is NT that difficult to maintain? (I don't think so)

        No, they don't have any reason to.

  11. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >Is NT that difficult to maintain?
    It is when, over time, you've replaced your entire core team with "diversity".

  12. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    It's in progress, but it may be a doomed project. There's a feature flag to enable a user space compatibility layer for a vanilla Linux kernel, but it's unbelievably cursed due to the extremely complicated history of NT where it simultaneously picked up responsibilities outside of its contract and granted privileges it should have guarded.

  13. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Linux is a monolithic kernel. NT is a hybrid. Porting programs from one design to the other is far from trivial, even more so because many default Windows applications were written with the bare Windows API and had to deal with the huge clusterfrick the CRT library is (e.g. Windows don't always start at main, they may have different starting points depending on how the program is launched).

    Windows wires Intel processors' Ctrl+Alt+Delete interrupt to a handler that allows you to type your password, log off or do other stuff with a hardware-level guarantee no program can intercept it. Linux will never have that feature for fear of breaking cross-CPU portability.

    Why the frick would they? Windows has all the applications the public wants. The only thing for which Microsoft has a vested interest in using Linux is servers, and then there's no reason for them to reinvent all userspace applications.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >Intel processors' Ctrl+Alt+Delete interrupt
      No such thing, this is handled entirely in software.
      >Linux will never have that feature
      sysrq-k

  14. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    That is the stupidest thing I have ever heard. Windows NT is the death star of operating systems once you understand the architecture. There is nothing to abandon it for.

  15. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I've never even heard this "theory" outside of IQfy, sounds like some loonie speak. I could write essays on how stupid of an idea that is and how microsoft would never even consider it, but I'll just call you stupid for being a moron instead.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      I've heard on Twitter too, even by some people in the tech media. The ideia is that Microsoft is becoming much more a company that sells services, then dropping some costly tech like NT kernel as it is losing importance (Xbox is dying and Windows Mobile is dead) would make maintenance less costly.

      The problem is that dropping NT kernel will generate higher costs than maintaining it.

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Those people have no idea what they are talking about and thank god they are not given any responsibilities or important jobs. You'd have to be moronic to not see this as anything but a horror scenario for MS in the long run. There's a reason why even google is desperately trying to find a replacement, the upkeep costs of a kernel are pocket change to the companies of Google/Apple/Microsoft level.

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Twitter is moronic, i can see them scraping NT on bare metal and going the Hyper-v w/ Linux alongside route in the future, but Linux fundamentally clashes with their bussiness objectives for the consumer market (that's it, propietary software, all way to the drivers). Even Google is trying to ditch Linux for the smartphone market.

        • 2 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          >Even Google is trying to ditch Linux for the smartphone market

          Fuchsia is already dead.

  16. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    the NT Kernel makes Linux look like a toy (which it is)

  17. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Why would Microsoft use Linux if BSD exists?

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      BSD isn't a kernel.

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        It is a userland too but it is permissive who cares.

  18. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Depends on how windows fares in the consumer space. If windows dies for consumers, I can see them making some sort of chromeOS competitor based on Linux, especially considering their past lightweight NT based windows have all failed in the consumer space. The future of consumer computing is just over glorified smartphones, so the need for a fully fledged NT windows for consumers is shrinking every year.
    I can't see them ever abandoning NT outright due to how deep rooted it is in corporations and enterprise. Too many systems rely on ancient windows programs that will only run under NT.

  19. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    They're just gonna go full cloud software as a service.

  20. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    NT doesn't need to. It can easily wear different hats. One of them being Linux. It was designed that way.

  21. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Very. I started using windows again with my current job, and many the API pieces that are windows specific, have long silce been deprecated. Yet I'm still slinging ActiveX. I suspect the sunk cost fallacy is big enough for Microsoft to put an unhealthy stake on Windows. I don't need it, and more importantly don't want it. I'll work on .NET to pay the bills, sure, but when I'm off the clock I don't give a shit anymore

  22. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    If nothing else it's more likely than any new kernel being widely used (by anybody) which is slightly scary.

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