Is Beowulf a fundementally christian story with a pagan veneer or a fundementally pagan story with a christian veneer?

Is Beowulf a fundementally christian story with a pagan veneer or a fundementally pagan story with a christian veneer?

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  1. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    The latter. Beowulf (the character) and his buddies have a heretical view of Christianity and cares more about fighting monsters and being a badass than doing feminine shit like confessing sins to a priest.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      What a moron

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Paggies are getting a bit too uppity. We need a new inquisition.

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          Your leaders are on our side.
          Be careful what you wish for.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Low IQ take

      It is both and neither. Whether or not it takes a stance on which religion/worldview is to be preferred is irrelevant as the implicit dialogue between the two is already fully embodied in text as a separate set of discourses which — in order to struggle against one another, the confusion itself on the author’s intent being evidence that such a struggle is taking place — must be fleshed out independently of one another. In essence each facet of the story is split between a Christian and Pagan components. Grendel is both a pre-Christian monster and a devil born of sin. The dragon is both a warning of avarice and a potential for selfish glory. The social contradictions which the poet(s) would have been born into themselves predetermined their use of symbols and narrative structure in such a way that even if the author wrote everything with a Pagan (or Christian) intent then the symbols themselves would already be defined in opposition to Christianity beforehand, making the issue one of teasing out the Christian influences under the preformulated pagan signs. In short, there cannot be a purely Christian or Pagan Beowulf because the society in which it was written was neither purely Christian or Pagan.

      High IQ take

  2. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Neither

  3. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Christianity is all veneer

  4. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    It is both and neither. Whether or not it takes a stance on which religion/worldview is to be preferred is irrelevant as the implicit dialogue between the two is already fully embodied in text as a separate set of discourses which — in order to struggle against one another, the confusion itself on the author’s intent being evidence that such a struggle is taking place — must be fleshed out independently of one another. In essence each facet of the story is split between a Christian and Pagan components. Grendel is both a pre-Christian monster and a devil born of sin. The dragon is both a warning of avarice and a potential for selfish glory. The social contradictions which the poet(s) would have been born into themselves predetermined their use of symbols and narrative structure in such a way that even if the author wrote everything with a Pagan (or Christian) intent then the symbols themselves would already be defined in opposition to Christianity beforehand, making the issue one of teasing out the Christian influences under the preformulated pagan signs. In short, there cannot be a purely Christian or Pagan Beowulf because the society in which it was written was neither purely Christian or Pagan.

  5. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    *mogs you by several thousand years*

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      clearly a christian story

  6. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Beowulf engages with chthonic monsters rather than with demons and triumphs because of his innate gifts as a great warrior. The story is much closer to Germanic paganism in spirit than to any Middle Eastern religion.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      The monsters are descendants of Cain and all innate abilities are gifts from the Holy Spirit.

  7. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    It's non-israeli, which makes it Christian

  8. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    This is a fundamentally moronic question. Under both labels we've seen basically every extreme and everything between. Early churches were decorated with monsters, then there was a trend of seeing monster imagery as heretical then a revival of monsters etc.

  9. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I didn't see the word Christ anywhere in it the last time I read it.

  10. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    don't think the ramblings of circumcised bedouins have much to do with it, regardless of what some fat half mexican half bantu church goer from texas may think about it

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      This post is enough of an argument against atheism

  11. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Grendel part and Grendel's mother part are pagan, the Dragon part is Christian.

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