Is entropy a meme?

Is entropy a meme? It seems to me that entropy just describes the fact that as time goes on, disorderly arrangements become more probable simply because there are more disorderly states than orderly states. But with conscious life it becomes the opposite since we intentionally create order. So why should we expect a heat death, exactly? Energy cannot be lost

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  1. 4 weeks ago
    Barkon

    And one more.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Barkon

      Maybe more.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Barkon

      A 5 considering the neck of things and I'm not sure this is even trustworthy.

  2. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >Energy cannot be lost
    In quantum mechanics it can.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      No it can't

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >energy of a free particle: E = p^2/2m
        >measure momentum p_1
        >measure position x
        >maximum uncertainty in momentum again
        >measure momentum p_2
        >almost certainly p_1 != p_2
        >energy loss / gain of ((p_2)^2 - (p_1)^2)/2m

  3. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >intentionally create order
    Intentionally creating order expels heat which adds more entropy than whatever 'order' you created took away. You can't cheat the second law

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      with a few movements of the hand I can create a house of cards that would be virtually impossible to arise without an intelligence to do so. If entropy increases in this situation, then what the hell is entropy? Because the “order” has only increased

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >then what the hell is entropy?
        It's proportional to heat if the temperature is constant.

        >energy of a free particle: E = p^2/2m
        >measure momentum p_1
        >measure position x
        >maximum uncertainty in momentum again
        >measure momentum p_2
        >almost certainly p_1 != p_2
        >energy loss / gain of ((p_2)^2 - (p_1)^2)/2m

        You added energy in the measurement process. The time evolution in quantum mechanics conserves energy

        • 4 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          Why do you comment when you clearly never studied QM?

          >You added energy in the measurement process.
          The energy used in the measurement process is within a fixed positive range. The meaured momentum can take arbitrary positive or negative values.

          >The time evolution in quantum mechanics conserves energy
          Absolutely irrelevant here because there is a collapse of the wave function involved.

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >when you clearly never studied QM?
            I have a phd that focused on quantum field theory.

            >Absolutely irrelevant here because there is a collapse of the wave function involved.
            The collapse of the wave function is describing a measurement. This is exactly why I said that you added energy in the measurement process, and not in the normal time evolution described by quantum mechanics which unequivocally conserves energy.

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Nice larp, dipshit, but you're clearly clueless. I just told you the difference in energy between the first and the second momentum state can vastly exceed the energy introduced via the measurement process.

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            If you don't measure it, it stays in the first momentum state. Energy is conserved. Do you get it now? This is my last reply to you

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Let E_1 be the energy in state p_1 (and same for 2). The energy introducible via measurement is in the range [E_min, E_max]. How do you explain the cases where E_2 - E_1 > E_max? That's right, you can't. Because you're wrong.

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            There is no evidence that wavefunctions can collapse.

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            writingtoiq.com says that you have an IQ of 129

            170 IQ

            >when you clearly never studied QM?
            I have a phd that focused on quantum field theory.

            >Absolutely irrelevant here because there is a collapse of the wave function involved.
            The collapse of the wave function is describing a measurement. This is exactly why I said that you added energy in the measurement process, and not in the normal time evolution described by quantum mechanics which unequivocally conserves energy.

            138 IQ

            Nice larp, dipshit, but you're clearly clueless. I just told you the difference in energy between the first and the second momentum state can vastly exceed the energy introduced via the measurement process.

            150 IQ

            entropy is a matter of dissipation of useful energy, building a house of cards doesnt allow you to do more work
            like the "disorder" and "order" doesn't make sense to me, just think about it in terms of useful energy

            even if you did build a house of cards with more order you had to kill a cow to get the energy to move your hands, hence more disorder

            102 IQ

          • 4 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Verbal phrenology.

      • 4 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        entropy is a matter of dissipation of useful energy, building a house of cards doesnt allow you to do more work
        like the "disorder" and "order" doesn't make sense to me, just think about it in terms of useful energy

        even if you did build a house of cards with more order you had to kill a cow to get the energy to move your hands, hence more disorder

  4. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Relative context, even your post demands adherence to linear order.

  5. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    But homogenity is order, the world you see right now is max entropy

  6. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I don't like the statistical definition of entropy, even if it's equivalent to the thermodynamic perspective. I think entropy is best understood in a historical context via the laws of thermodynamics.

    0th law: if A & B are in thermal equilbrium, and B & C are in thermal equilbrium, then A & C are in thermal equilibrium

    1st law: Conservation of energy. When thermal energy is exchanged between regions, the total energy must stay conserved.

    2nd law: Energy never flows spontaneously from "cold" to "hot" regions. Or, in other words, in thermodynmic processes you always lose some energy to the environment (spontaneously from "hot" to "cold").

    Historically, when engines were being developed, you needed a so-called "hot" reservoir (like combustion, steam, etc.) which operated some mechanism for mechanical work (a piston moving, a gear spinning, etc.) The "cold" reservoir is the external environment. Two different temperatures, and energy would flow from the hot to the cold region spontaneously, and there's nothing you can do about it. You can interpret this as some kind of "leakage" energy. Higher temperature differential means more leakage.

    It became useful to quantify this type of "leakage" energy (which also depended on temperature differentials) as an entropy, or effectively a measure of how much energy you had to work with in any type of engine. The statistical picture comes from interpreting the motion of molecules as heat. If via some mechanism you restricted all the gas molecules of air to the corner of your room, they'd be in a "hot" reservoir or a "low" entropy state (high confidence in where they're clustered). If you undo whatever has them locked in the corner, the flow of entropy should be from "hot" to "cold". i.e. the particles will spontaneously reach an equilibrium state by dispersing into a "cold" region, i.e. everywhere there's empty space. Entropy becomes a "high" state, i.e. less confident in where any individual molecule is

  7. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Entropy is wrong. The universe is increasing in order.

  8. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >But with conscious life it becomes the opposite since we intentionally create order.
    If you quantify this "order" you create you end up realizing you had to create much more "disorder" as a byproduct.

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