Is he done for?

Just recently listened to an interview in which Vollmann said he was dropped by Viking for dropping a one million word bomb of a manuscript on his editor about the CIA and 9/11. He doesn’t even know if he’ll publish it in the US, or continue writing. He doesn’t even seem like he wants to finish the seven dreams. Is it over for us vollbros?

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  1. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >In 2008, as part of an exploration of prostitution and transgenderism, Vollmann began cross dressing and developed a female alter ego named Dolores, which is documented in The Book of Dolores. Dolores is a relatively young woman trapped in this fat, aging male body,' Mr. Vollmann said. 'I’ve bought her a bunch of clothes, but she's not grateful.
    War is... hell?

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Nah, peace is hell

  2. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >a one million word bomb of a manuscript on his editor about the CIA and 9/11

    Damn, sounds awesome.

  3. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Why not publish it? The CIA loves the bad press so long it bolsters US economy. It's not like the theme is taboo, it's been more than 20 years and the internet has desensitized just about everyone (other than the dancing Mossad) to it.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >Why not publish it?
      oy vey! What an antisemitic question! Are you a holocaust denier? How dare you?

  4. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    You mean he questioned the official narrative?

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      To hear him tell it, the main point of contention between he and his editor was the amount of fonts he wanted to use. The 1300 page length was a secondary concern.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        1300 pages would be closer to half a million words unless he really abuses short words or tiny fonts/large page size or the like. Infinite Jest is something like 550,000 words and it took a great deal of finagling to get it squeezed into 1100 pages, wonderful layout despite the tiny font for the end notes. Also lots of fonts is a non-issue since we gave up movable type with the invention of the offset press.

        Vollmann is probably just exploiting the drama and trying to get publishers into a bidding war for him, sounds like he had no contract (no reason for him to have one with his status) and Viking passed. Vollmann is an easy sell and he knows it.

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          why are modern-day publishers so fricking phobic of publishing longer works in sets of volumes? in the past you'd buy massive works like war and Peace and clarissa in multiple volumes. Nowadays they publish single volume 1300 page books with atom-sized fonts only ants can read, even worse when they're paperback

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Because two volumes are almost twice as expensive to produce and most people will buy the single volume for half the price. Most of the cost of printing is in turning all those printed pages into an actual book so if you split it into two books you cause a substantial increase in production costs. Few books have fonts which are too small to comfortably read, if you have a problem reading them you probably need reading glasses.

            The example I gave of IJ has a fairly standard sized font and relies on a slightly larger page size and seriously anal layout to squeeze more words onto the page, they played with kerning, line spacing and margin widths and even went to single quotes instead of double quotes just to save a tiny bit of space. Giving a fresh look at the endnotes and it seems that font is only a hair smaller than the main font, they decreased line spacing and kerning to squeeze in more on the endnotes which is fairly standard for foot/endnotes. IJ is worth some study for anyone interested in layout.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >Because two volumes are almost twice as expensive to produce and most people will buy the single volume for half the price.
            That's rubbish. A single book does not cost to manufacture any where NEAR its retail selling price. The only reason why vollmann and mcelroy are so needlessly expensive is the same reason as apple products. they're a showpiece, the publishers are aware of the sophisticated and noble air that eminate from those books. Re infinite Jest, that I understand, because iirc it was supposed to be and was marketed as this really challenging tome, so of course I have no problem there. That's interesting about the quotation marks though. I wondered why they were single ones, that makes sense.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            I thought the reason that books that are expensive was because they were smaller runs. If they print many books, they can sell them cheaper. If they don't make that many books they have to sell them more expensively.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >That's rubbish. A single book does not cost to manufacture any where NEAR its retail selling price.
            NTA, but two volumes = twice the printing cost, and increased shipping cost. And it's not like Vollman is going to be a best seller. Few books will be sold, and fewer yet because a two-volume edition will be more expensive than one volume would have been; and of those few only a very few will sell at the full retail price, with most copies being sold at a substantial discount via Amazon or some other online seller. Publishers work on a small profit margin to begin with; an ordinary commercial publisher like Viking is not going to publish a book where unusually high production costs practically guarantee a loss.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Not rubbish, I worked in a print shop for many years, it is not an accident that I notice things like the nuances of page layout and book design. Sure the cost of materials is little but labor adds up and the labor is doubled for two volumes. If you are talking high enough volumes that materials cost become insignificant (which is not the case with Vollmann) the storage, handling and distribution of that number of books becomes significant. This also limits you to the big print shops that have the shop space and storage space for doing such high volumes and just setting up those massive presses for a single run can be a weeks labor for a complex and lengthy book*. On top of printing costs you have all the prepress work which is considerable for a book of that size, plates and their associated labor, transport, storage, distribution and then the costs of the publisher themselves and paying their bills and employees, etc.it all adds up.

            Vollmann is expensive because he does not have the sales required for a high volume printing and likes to write lengthy novels. McElroy is expensive because his books have largely remained out of print but the recent editions were perfectly inline with comparable books printed in low volumes.

            *Having a wide variety of fonts in a book actually increases labor considerably; when laying out a book for offset printing you attempt to even out the ink requirements across the page, make it so every line uses roughly the same amount of ink so the ink feed is relatively even and constant which allows the presses to run at high speeds and largely unwatched. Lots of fonts can mean it is impossible to get anything approaching that ideal ink feed so the presses run slower and are watched like a hawk and layout turns into a lengthy back and forth between the author, designer and press operator in an attempt to find that balance which everyone can live with, so more costs,

            There are some modern presses with fancy programmable ink feeds but these are not the standard and will generally increase costs more than anything in the case of printing words on a page.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Apparently the publisher doesn’t own the fonts and they have to pay and rent them to use them. Isn’t corporate fascism and their bean counters great?

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          Then use fonts you can buy or make your own? What's the problem here?

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          And Viking certainly has the rights to use fonts which would be close enough that only the font autist would be able to differentiate so unless his big 9//11 CIA novel is actually an allegory for font autism it doesn't matter. He is just trying to get a bidding war going.

          Then use fonts you can buy or make your own? What's the problem here?

          They can buy rights to all the fonts required but making new fonts is more expensive. It is just a ploy.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            I recommend Shadows of Love/Shadows of Loneliness because of his explication of photography and paintings he creates utilizing various materials. Throughout this work WTV does give long narrations concerning the art and locations of said photos. And I like this work because I believe a lot of emotions went through this project when his daughter died during this time period. I look through this work with a different “eye” since that revelation.

            Also, the work is obviously a collector's item. 250 sets were published, I believe. I would only purchase this work if I were a true WTV aficionado, which I have been since 1987.

            [...]
            I turned 70 a few months ago. I've been reading WTV for 37 years. Forward, into the future!

            I was considering buying the book but this article makes the rarebirdlit guy seem shady af.

            https://www.adagiopress.com/tyson-cornell-and-rare-bird-lit-profile-of-an-american-con/

            I've read Max Perkins Editor of Genius (publisher of Fitzgerald, Hemingway, Wolfe). Anyways, you realize how publishing is more about selling what the market perceives as genius and original. It's manufactured which certainly takes away from authenticity.

            Also, I remember James Nulik writing in his book Valencia that when he told Vollmann he had no money that Vollmann suggested selling his body. Don't have the book in front of me for the exact quote, but wow...that's some pretty bold advice.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            There was one or two interviews that WTV had given (I heard them via Internet podcast) that he was not happy with RareBird Lit because of delays in publication. (The addresses for the interviews escapes me right now.)

            I have never heard of Valencia by James Nulik (and will look into it, thanks for mentioning it), but it does not surprise me that WTV would say something like that to Mr. Nulik.

            Without defending WTV, he has lived and does live on the leading edge (I could not have done what he has done with his life; I don’t have it within me). He has faced death in war zones, came perilously close to death in the Balkans, nearly froze to death in Greenland, interviewed international gangsters in south Asia and Africa for stories, rescued a young Thai girl from prostitution. In that context, I think he has nothing to lose and will always tell a person a truth from his viewpoint.

            And thank God for Maxwell Perkins.

  5. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    What's your favorite Volleman book?. I read riding toward everywhere last week.
    shit was cash.

    Voilleman is the only anglophone writer who deserves the nobel.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Fathers and crows or YBRA for me. Working through Argall now and the 1700s English is really neat, but just not as impressive as something like m&d or the Sotweed Factor

  6. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    How should one get started with this writer?

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      I’ve read all of WTV since YB&RA appeared in 1987 and liked everyone of them except for Kissing the Mask: Beauty, Understatement and Femininity in Japanese Noh Theater. I’ve tried twice to read it, stopped a third of the way into the book each time. I am just not interested in the subject of transgenderism and related ilk, plus, sad to say, I thought it was a boring read.

      I recommend Poor People, The Atlas, Imperial, Riding Toward Everywhere, Uncentering the Earth, Carbon Ideologies, and The Rainbow Stories for beginners.

      And he deserves the Nobel; he's earned it. Period.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        How's his new photography box set : shadows of love, shadows of loneliness?

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          Not that anon but I leafed through the copy we have here at the bookstore in which I work. It’s just a photo collection, but it’s an amazing summation of his life and adventures up to this point. He has so many insane anecdotes that finally are given “proof” in it, but if you’re expecting a novel, it’s not.

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          I recommend Shadows of Love/Shadows of Loneliness because of his explication of photography and paintings he creates utilizing various materials. Throughout this work WTV does give long narrations concerning the art and locations of said photos. And I like this work because I believe a lot of emotions went through this project when his daughter died during this time period. I look through this work with a different “eye” since that revelation.

          Also, the work is obviously a collector's item. 250 sets were published, I believe. I would only purchase this work if I were a true WTV aficionado, which I have been since 1987.

          How old are you anon?

          I turned 70 a few months ago. I've been reading WTV for 37 years. Forward, into the future!

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Addendum in re Shadows of Love. . . that photo of him and his very young daughter where he is holding her foot tore through and broke me.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            You're 70? How did you find this website??

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            I lurked in IQfy pol for a while for the laughs, then decided to check out IQfy lit to see what it was all about. I lurked here for many years to get the feel of the place before replying to anything. I realized that many—if not all—here are a lot younger and delving into deep literature, philosophy, etc., like I did when I was a young man. (I did not have the advantage of an Internet back then; it was strictly word-of-mouth, book reviews, and catalogues.) I have never stopped reading; literature has been one of the few major loves of my life, and will continue to be so until I have shuffled off this mortal coil.

            So I'll still be lurking here, absorbing the Gestalt of this particular and peculiar website. Cheers.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            HUGEEEE larp

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            What other authors are you passionate about? Are you the anon who was posting about Nostromo some time ago, as well?

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            I thank IQfylit for turning me on to Mircea Cartarescu with his book Solenoid.

            (Too many) other modern authors I feel passionate about:
            WTV
            Alexander Theroux. I like all his writings. In my opinion, his Laura Warholic is the greatest American novel so far in the 21st century. I figured this novel would be right up there in IQfylit’s greatest hits, because of the subject matter, but we’ll see.
            Thomas Wolfe, William Gaddis, Michel Houellebecq, Javier Marias, Peter Nadas, László Krasznahorkai, James Ellroy, G. G. Marquez, et alia.
            Jim Gauer. Novel Explosives (the only book [2016] he has written, but I like it)
            The early T. R. Pearson (the Neely trilogy). Faulkneresque comedy, for want of a better term

            Classics:
            The ancient Greek and Roman writers Hesiod/Homer/Ovid/Cicero/Juvenal/Strabo/Diodorus Siculus, Pliny the Elder and Younger, et alia.

            Plutarch/Shakespeare/Dante/Chaucer/Boccaccio/Cervantes/Montaigne/Dostoevsky/Melville’s Moby Dick, et alia.

            And I am not the anon who posted about Nostromo.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            You're not 70.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            I'll take that as a compliment. But, yes, I am 70, and am happy that I have made it this far. Quite frankly, I didn't expect to. So I'll keep reading good literature until old age and decrepitude sets in, and you'll see me sitting in a rocking chair drooling into a cup.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Based af. Poast more, we need an antidote to all the zoomers.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            I personally don't believe either but he is a very impressively autistic anon, he could be work shopping a book character or something

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Yeah the lifestory is a little too literary, but impressive to come up with that nonetheless.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            It is PEAK IQfyard cope to believe that some extremely well read boomer who has seen it all is looking down on the stale repetitive antics of IQfy, smiling and thinking "these kids are gonna be alright"

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            This fricker is not even close to being well read. All the authors he is namedropping are r/truelit choices and most redditors there aren't even 30. Stfu zoomer.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            I'll be 28 in a few weeks, I'm definitely not a zoomer.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            I'm 45. I'm glad to see you kids reading here..or at least reading about reading.

            There are probably a few more older people than you think. I've been around computers since I was 7 or 8. I appreciate this site for its simplicity and semi anonymity. Most of all though my inner child appreciates the juvenile language and humor.

            The problem that this site has, is it leans towards pessimistic dismissiveness. You have to sift through a lot of garbage, but as a testament to some of the people here I have discovered some great books and have read some great discussions.

            Vollmann is one of the greatest living writers. It's not a matter of personal aesthetics. It's a fact. YOU may not like him or his style, but he does something that very few authors can do which is to exhaustively explore a given topic along with its players and present it in all it's macro glory with a million shades of nuance so that when you read it you get some semblance of what the actual truth is. Even before youtube and ever decreasing attention spans readers could not appreciate this type of writing. And I agree with others that he deserves the Nobel as much as anyone.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Hear, hear!

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            I'm 47 and have been on IQfy since it started, now I pretty much only browse IQfy.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >YOU may not like him or his style, but he does something that very few authors can do which is to exhaustively explore a given topic along with its players and present it in all it's macro glory with a million shades of nuance so that when you read it you get some semblance of what the actual truth is
            Are you talking about fiction or non-fiction. What's a good example of what you're talking about.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >There are probably a few more older people than you think.
            There are quite a few of us in our 40s but the 70 year old is almost certainly a larper, all he really talks about is himself and his likes and dislikes, offers nothing but teenaged narcissism. Few people make it to 30 with that mentality, but I suppose if you did manage to make it to 70 while remaining mentally a teenager IQfy is where you would end up.

            I'm 47 and have been on IQfy since it started, now I pretty much only browse IQfy.

            Same but a few years younger. one board is all I can take of IQfy autism these days.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            I lurked in IQfy pol for a while for the laughs, then decided to check out IQfy lit to see what it was all about. I lurked here for many years to get the feel of the place before replying to anything. I realized that many—if not all—here are a lot younger and delving into deep literature, philosophy, etc., like I did when I was a young man. (I did not have the advantage of an Internet back then; it was strictly word-of-mouth, book reviews, and catalogues.) I have never stopped reading; literature has been one of the few major loves of my life, and will continue to be so until I have shuffled off this mortal coil.

            So I'll still be lurking here, absorbing the Gestalt of this particular and peculiar website. Cheers.

            Based IQfy boomer. Send a pic of your bookshelf.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            I would love to send you a pic of my many bookshelves, but I do not own a camera nor a cell phone. I live in the mountains in the middle of a vast wilderness and have no cell tower connection; live in a dead zone. I do have satellite internet but no satellite phone. No television connection either. I am a semi-Luddite boomer by choice.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            How many books do you have and what are your favorite 10?

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            this
            pls answer based 70yo boomer

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            this
            pls answer based 70yo boomer

            This is going to be really tough. It is probably not what you are expecting. There are so many choice, excellent books in this world.

            My personal favorite books:

            The Bible (1611 KJV; NASB)

            The Life Divine by Sri Aurobindo

            The Harmony of the World by Johannes Kepler. American Philosophical Society. 1997. (1st unabridged English translation)

            Synergetics (2 vols.) by R. Buckminster Fuller

            Nimrod: A Discourse on Certain Passages of Fable and History (4 vols.) 1828-1830 by the Honorable Algernon Herbert [available at the Internet Archive]

            Anacalypsis, an Attempt to Draw Aside the Veil of the Saitic Isis; or, an Inquiry into the Origin of Languages, Nations, and Religions by Godfrey Higgins. (2 vols.) 1836.

            Antiquity Explained, and Represented in Sculptures (10 vols.) by Bernard de Montfaucon. Translated by David Humphreys. London. 1722.

            Materials for the Study of Social Symbolism in Ancient and Tribal Art by Carl Schuster and Edmund Carpenter. Based on the research and writings of Carl Schuster. 3 vols, Rock Foundation, 1986-89. Privately printed. [600 sets were printed: 593 of them were given to European academic libraries. 6 sets were available for sale to the general public. I purchased the 5th set.] There is an available abridged edition of this work titled Patterns That Connect.

            Rising Up and Rising Down (7 vols.) by William T. Vollmann

            Laura Warholic, or The Sexual Intellectual by Alexander Theroux

            I have approximately 10,000 books on a variety of subjects which interest me, including top-grade fiction. (My wife says I have more than that.) Many are still boxed and sealed, stored in a dry environment. There is a plan to build a library here on our property in the not-too-distant future.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            That's high IQ stuff. I could never. Btw what are your thoughts on that Vollmann book? Does he reach a conclusion?

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Are you into geometric shit?
            https://theuntranslated.wordpress.com/2016/11/10/the-troiacord-el-troiacord-by-miquel-de-palol/

            https://theuntranslated.wordpress.com/2021/09/04/bootes-bootes-by-miquel-de-palol/

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Yes, I love geometry. Euclidean and non-Euclidean. I graduated from university with a bachelor’s degree in mathematics and philosophy. I still have a warm feeling for ordinary and partial differential equations, which was my favorite field of study.

            Then Synergetics was published 2 weeks before I graduated. Reading through it, the realization came to me that this was the mathematics work I had been looking for. Go figure.

            Synergetics reveals that the entire universal cosmos operates in a 60° tetrahedral-octahedral coordination system. The 90° coordination system (x-y-z axes) is subsumed within the octahedron.

            I’ll be checking out the 2 sites you mentioned in your post because of Miquel de Palol. I read The Garden of Seven Twilights last year; a masterpiece. Thanks, anon, I greatly appreciate it.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Oldanon, what did you do for a living? I assume you're retired now.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            I retired in 2004 at the age of 50. I started as a substation mechanic at age 22 for a private company, working in industrial concerns across America. I received a real, practical education in how things were manufactured, etc.; how men made their living every day. Oil and chemical refineries, underground coal mines, automobile manufacturing plants, steel mills, drop forge foundries; these types of places. Then, at age 25, without divulging where I worked, I became a high voltage substation operator and worked my way up to senior power dispatcher for an electric utility; in charge of buying and selling power from other control areas on the grid, scheduling switching operations and power outages; in charge of the power grid on a weekly rotating shift: days, swings, graveyards. I had to retire due to health concerns; my body couldn’t do the shift work anymore. But it was a lot of intense fun with lurking potential danger. I still miss performing supervised substation switching operations to take equipment in and out of service.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Next dfw right here

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >Synergetics reveals that the entire universal cosmos operates in a 60° tetrahedral-octahedral coordination system. The 90° coordination system (x-y-z axes) is subsumed within the octahedron.
            Hasn't physics known for decades that the coordinate system is arbitrary

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Palol was the biggest hack i read last year

            >Synergetics reveals that the entire universal cosmos operates in a 60° tetrahedral-octahedral coordination system. The 90° coordination system (x-y-z axes) is subsumed within the octahedron.
            Hasn't physics known for decades that the coordinate system is arbitrary

            He is baiting postmodern shitters and guess what, they are stupid enough to be baited.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            thx mr. basedboomer
            do you have a
            top 10 authors?
            top 10 novels?
            top 10 essay books?
            top 10 short story collections?
            top 10 poetry books?
            pls answer me senpai

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Particularly interested in the novels if he doesn't have the time nor the patience for the others.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            10 Novels:
            Solenoid by Mircea Cartarescu
            Laura Warholic, or the Sexual Intellectual by Alexander Theroux
            Darconville’s cat by Alexander Theroux
            Of Time and the River by Thomas Wolfe
            Don Quixote by Miguel de Cervantes
            Moby-Dick by Herman Melville
            The Recognitions by William Gaddis
            The Count of Monte Cristo by Alexander Dumas (unabridged edition)
            100 Years of Solitude by Gabriel Garcia Marquez
            Life and Fate Vasily Grossman

            Of poetry (mostly read during my younger days):
            Homer
            Ovid
            Catullus
            Juvenal
            Chaucer
            Shakespeare
            Dante
            Milton
            Sri Aurobindo. Collected Poems. Includes “Savitri” and “Ilion.” His works are available for downloading at https://www.sriaurobindoashram.org/sriaurobindo/writings.php
            Charles “Hank” Bukowski

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Thanks for sharing, wise anon!

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            based
            can you please share your top 10 authors?
            thx again mr. boomer

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Top 10 Authors no particular order:

            William T. Vollmann
            Alexander Theroux
            Thomas Wolfe
            Mircea Cartarescu
            Javier Marias
            Fyodor Dostoevsky
            Thomas Pynchon
            William Faulkner
            Washington Irving
            Edgar Allan Poe

            I'm done.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >I'm done.
            It seems like we annoyed you, didn't we?

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            No. I'm tired, is all.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >boomer with zoomer taste
            Yeah, you're not 70.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Millennial taste, maybe. Zoomers would count videogames or rap as literature.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Thank you Mr. Boomer
            Have you read Alberto Laiseca, Nicolás Gómez Dávila or Alberto Manguel?
            I think you'd love them
            Have a nice rest, Mr. Boomer
            -
            P.S. Leave a will for your books. I'm young and I have it, I don't want them to be sold by the pound or just tossed in the trash

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            I have heard of Alberto Manguel, but not the other two. I will check them out. I am always open to recommended authors I have not heard about. This just broadens my education.

            In re the literature I have collected, upon my passing the books will be up for sale in a book auction. I don’t want them trashed either. They’re modern first editions, some of them signed by writers my wife and I have met and talked with over the years. Others are rare antiquarian books from the 1600s through 1800s. It would make me happy that these books get into the hands of people who appreciate literature and not inside academic institutions where they would essentially disappear from the public’s eyes.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >Alberto Laiseca
            Dogshit
            > Nicolás Gómez Dávila
            Good writer
            >Alberto Manguel
            literally who

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Please Mr. Boomer, I'm very interested too.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Kek. I don’t believe you are 70 but you are old as frick if you think the nobel prize means something

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            In the old days, the Nobel Prize for Literature may have meant something to the literary art world, but nowadays, it seems to have degraded because of the current toxic culture and political environment. I still cannot get over the fact that Bob Dylan received the Nobel. And most people—me included—could not tell you who won the Prize in the last 10 years, unless I have to look it up. I know Jon Fosse won it last year, but I have not yet read any of his works.

            20-25 years ago there was talk in the literary circles I was acquainted with that Mr. Vollmann deserved the Nobel, and a few were pushing it seriously. Even WTV talked about it and always laughed when it was mentioned, but it is my belief that he certainly would not turn it down if it was given to him. Far as I am concerned, after reading and absorbing his oeuvre over the years, he has earned it. Period.

            Yes, I truly am 70, but not “old as frick.” I consider myself to be aging like a fine wine. Cheers.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Not rubbish, I worked in a print shop for many years, it is not an accident that I notice things like the nuances of page layout and book design. Sure the cost of materials is little but labor adds up and the labor is doubled for two volumes. If you are talking high enough volumes that materials cost become insignificant (which is not the case with Vollmann) the storage, handling and distribution of that number of books becomes significant. This also limits you to the big print shops that have the shop space and storage space for doing such high volumes and just setting up those massive presses for a single run can be a weeks labor for a complex and lengthy book*. On top of printing costs you have all the prepress work which is considerable for a book of that size, plates and their associated labor, transport, storage, distribution and then the costs of the publisher themselves and paying their bills and employees, etc.it all adds up.

            Vollmann is expensive because he does not have the sales required for a high volume printing and likes to write lengthy novels. McElroy is expensive because his books have largely remained out of print but the recent editions were perfectly inline with comparable books printed in low volumes.

            *Having a wide variety of fonts in a book actually increases labor considerably; when laying out a book for offset printing you attempt to even out the ink requirements across the page, make it so every line uses roughly the same amount of ink so the ink feed is relatively even and constant which allows the presses to run at high speeds and largely unwatched. Lots of fonts can mean it is impossible to get anything approaching that ideal ink feed so the presses run slower and are watched like a hawk and layout turns into a lengthy back and forth between the author, designer and press operator in an attempt to find that balance which everyone can live with, so more costs,

            There are some modern presses with fancy programmable ink feeds but these are not the standard and will generally increase costs more than anything in the case of printing words on a page.

            I thank IQfylit for turning me on to Mircea Cartarescu with his book Solenoid.

            (Too many) other modern authors I feel passionate about:
            WTV
            Alexander Theroux. I like all his writings. In my opinion, his Laura Warholic is the greatest American novel so far in the 21st century. I figured this novel would be right up there in IQfylit’s greatest hits, because of the subject matter, but we’ll see.
            Thomas Wolfe, William Gaddis, Michel Houellebecq, Javier Marias, Peter Nadas, László Krasznahorkai, James Ellroy, G. G. Marquez, et alia.
            Jim Gauer. Novel Explosives (the only book [2016] he has written, but I like it)
            The early T. R. Pearson (the Neely trilogy). Faulkneresque comedy, for want of a better term

            Classics:
            The ancient Greek and Roman writers Hesiod/Homer/Ovid/Cicero/Juvenal/Strabo/Diodorus Siculus, Pliny the Elder and Younger, et alia.

            Plutarch/Shakespeare/Dante/Chaucer/Boccaccio/Cervantes/Montaigne/Dostoevsky/Melville’s Moby Dick, et alia.

            And I am not the anon who posted about Nostromo.

            Tell me, oh wise man, how do I get a gf? I'm turning 28 in a few weeks and I'm starting to feel anxious and that I'll leave alone forever. Everyone's marrying, or at least that's my impression of people my age.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            I am not the 70 year old who I suspect is still alone and considerably younger, just the 42 year old ex-press operator. Work on your comprehension, our writing styles are nothing alike.

            Dating life in your 30s is actually easier than in your 20s, most everyone has dropped their pretenses by then and is willing to give most anyone a chance. By the late 30s most everyone who is single becomes very pragmatic about dating and sees love as something which is earned, not something which just happens. That pragmatism which comes with age also makes it easier to be alone, you get a much more clear idea of who and what it is you want in a mate and not just the hormone driven desire for a mate.

            But it all comes down to keeping at it and not giving up, keep meeting people and making friends and they will help, most people have an uncontrollable desire to play match maker. It is also a good idea to identify what you want in life besides a gf and make that happen, initiative and follow through is attractive to most people.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            My experience and advice to you in getting a girlfriend is limited to the extreme. I met my future wife when we were both 12 years of age at the junior high school we attended. We had lockers next to each other. Something clicked between us then and there, because we got married at 23 and we’re still going strong. We’ve known each other for 58 years.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        How old are you anon?

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        What about the one he won an award for? Europe Central?

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          I liked Europe Central a lot; it is one of his best novels. My wife and I saw WTV at Disney REDCAT in Los Angeles in Sept. 2004, where he read 3 chapters from this work before publication.

  7. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Its so hard to find his books - especially Carbon Ideologies. Read The Altas in Jan and it was great, especially reading about places I'd also been.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      At least in the U.S - they're relatively inexpensive on eBay.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Yeah I'm on the other side of the planet unfortunately so the shipping doubles the price

  8. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    What’s his most schizo book?

  9. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    you guys come on there's no way there's a 70 year old on this website

  10. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    He is a crossdresser, so his entire life's work is invalid.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Only for the purpose of researching one book, then he stopped

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Whatever, I'm not gay.

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          and you'll never be a respected author

  11. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I think this guy’s books suck and I suspect he only gets hype because he’s a complete weirdo

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      which ones have you read?

  12. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    He has written sooooo much. Where to start? Recommend me 3 fiction books by him

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      The Rainbow Stories
      Europe Central
      The Dying Grass

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